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Sylvie von Duuglas-Ittu

Running List of Books and Films to Inspire

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There aren't a lot of books or films directly about Muay Thai, the mental game for Muay Thai, the fighter's journey or all that. There are more options for other sports that have either been around for longer (Golf, Tennis, Running), or that have an English-speaking target audience (ultra-running, rock climbing). 

However, I find some sports very, very inspiring for Muay Thai and what the mental side of it feels like - to me anyway. Here's my running list of books and films: 

Rock Climbing: 

Free Solo:

Marathon Monks of Mt Hiei:

 

Momentum Generation

The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance

 

A Wrestling Life: the Inspiring Stories of Dan Gable

 

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 Legend of cus D’Amato 

Legendary nights- Mikey ward vs Arturo gatti story 

Rickson Gracie documentary 

“Notorious” - Conor mcgregor documentary on netflix (im sure u have seen it) 


Also I love this documentary called “breaking 2” about marathon running, I believe it is a Nat geo movie but I couldn’t find link

 

thank you for your share sylvie, appreciate you for all that is YOU!

Edited by B Mac
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8 hours ago, B Mac said:

 Legend of cus D’Amato 

Legendary nights- Mikey ward vs Arturo gatti story 

Rickson Gracie documentary 

“Notorious” - Conor mcgregor documentary on netflix (im sure u have seen it) 


Also I love this documentary called “breaking 2” about marathon running, I believe it is a Nat geo movie but I couldn’t find link

 

thank you for your share sylvie, appreciate you for all that is YOU!

I really enjoyed Conors Doco, even though he's such a showman his story surprised and inspired me. 

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    • one study: the left amygdalais more closely related to affective information encoding with a higher affinity to language and to detailed feature extraction, and the right amygdala to affective information retrieval with a higher affinity to pictorial or image-related material. Furthermore, the right amygdala may be more strongly engaged than the left one in a fast,shallow or gross analysis of affect-related information. read the study here: Differential_Contribution_of_Right_and_Left_Amygda.pdf They found in 17 normal subjects thatthe evaluation of unpleasant visual stimuli activated(among other regions) the left amygdala. This activa-tion not only held for fear-related, but for a wide rangeof unpleasant stimuli.Studying regional cerebral blood flow changes in re-sponse to the presentation of faces with different emo-tional expressions, has provided a major basis for es-tablishing a differential role of the left and right amyg-dala in cognitive information processing. Interestingresults were obtained in a series of studies by Mor-ris [85, 87, 88]. Morris et al. [85] found enhanced...On the other hand, Mor-ris et al. [87, 88] found a significant neural response inthe right, but not the left, amygdala to masked presen-tations of a conditioned angry face. Combined, thesefindings suggest that unconscious (masked) process-ing is mediated more readily by the right, and con-scious processing more readily by the left amygdala(among other structures).  
    • In some Follicular = left, Luteal = right from wikipedia, the amygdala Hemispheric specializations In one study, electrical stimulations of the right amygdala induced negative emotions, especially fear and sadness. In contrast, stimulation of the left amygdala was able to induce either pleasant (happiness) or unpleasant (fear, anxiety, sadness) emotions.[10] Other evidence suggests that the left amygdala plays a role in the brain's reward system.[11] Each side holds a specific function in how we perceive and process emotion. The right and left portions of the amygdala have independent memory systems, but work together to store, encode, and interpret emotion. The right hemisphere is associated with negative emotion.[12][13] It plays a role in the expression of fear and in the processing of fear-inducing stimuli. Fear conditioning, which occurs when a neutral stimulus acquires aversive properties, occurs within the right hemisphere. When an individual is presented with a conditioned, aversive stimulus, it is processed within the right amygdala, producing an unpleasant or fearful response. This emotional response conditions the individual to avoid fear-inducing stimuli and more importantly, to assess threats in the environment. The right hemisphere is also linked to declarative memory, which consists of facts and information from previously experienced events and must be consciously recalled. It also plays a significant role in the retention of episodic memory. Episodic memory consists of the autobiographical aspects of memory, permitting recall of emotional and sensory experience of an event. This type of memory does not require conscious recall. The right amygdala plays a role in the association of time and places with emotional properties.[14]
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    • one study: the left amygdalais more closely related to affective information encoding with a higher affinity to language and to detailed feature extraction, and the right amygdala to affective information retrieval with a higher affinity to pictorial or image-related material. Furthermore, the right amygdala may be more strongly engaged than the left one in a fast,shallow or gross analysis of affect-related information. read the study here: Differential_Contribution_of_Right_and_Left_Amygda.pdf They found in 17 normal subjects thatthe evaluation of unpleasant visual stimuli activated(among other regions) the left amygdala. This activa-tion not only held for fear-related, but for a wide rangeof unpleasant stimuli.Studying regional cerebral blood flow changes in re-sponse to the presentation of faces with different emo-tional expressions, has provided a major basis for es-tablishing a differential role of the left and right amyg-dala in cognitive information processing. Interestingresults were obtained in a series of studies by Mor-ris [85, 87, 88]. Morris et al. [85] found enhanced...On the other hand, Mor-ris et al. [87, 88] found a significant neural response inthe right, but not the left, amygdala to masked presen-tations of a conditioned angry face. Combined, thesefindings suggest that unconscious (masked) process-ing is mediated more readily by the right, and con-scious processing more readily by the left amygdala(among other structures).  
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    • Hi! Since I gathered a lot of expeirence getting injured and sick while training, I thought I would start a new topic, namely: gym/trainer advice received on how to care for injuries or ailments.  I will start with a couple of things I have been told and their origin.  Swollen, painful knuckles: massage with hot water and salt (western boxing coach, Sweden) Ligament or muscle issues: Ice bath with salt. Eat potatoes and ocra/lady fingers. (lethwei trainer, Myanmar) Any kind of muscle pain: warm water massage (basically all muay thai trainers, Thailand) Cough: gurgle with warm salt water (muay thai trainer, Thailand) Shin dents: gentle warm water massage downward motion (muay thai trainers, Thailand) Prevent skin rashes of any kind: rinse water directly after training then apply baby powder (muay thai trainer, Thailand) Pink eye: stay away, absolutely no clinching, hot water compress (muay thai trainers, Thailand)    
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