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LengLeng

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LengLeng last won the day on June 23

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    Yangon, Myanmar

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  1. My old gym Numponthep (where Satanmuenglek was for a long while) changed location during COVID. Not sure about the current training set up but they are operational in Bearing, BKK. When I was there it was heavily focused on clinching. Recent training between Silatong (great fighter) and Yuto (up and coming talented Japanese fighter) here https://fb.watch/dE4hOLft4u/
  2. I got two new treatments that helped me. Ligament injury on knee: a mix of a herb called "bone ligament plant" or similar in Burmese (see green herb in pic) mixed with ginger and salt and rice. Grond it well. Use plastic foil to wrap it on injured area for hours. Not sure if it helps but it definitely gets warm and stimulates blood flow. Injured/bruised/swollen eye: boiled duck egg wrapped in tissue gently pat the area while egg is warm. No idea about the science involved, but a perfect heat compression solution. The heat stays, the egg has a perfect shape for the eye.
  3. I'm prepping for a lethwei fight (fingers crossed) and after that there is a possibility I'll fight muay thai in Cambodia (again fingers crossed). During lethwei clinch, my teacher showed me how to press/rub the hard part of the skull against the opponent's soft parts of their face. Like bridge of nose, eyesocket. It's incredibly painful, I got what looks like scratch/burn marks on my cheek bone and nose after this. It's also mentally overwhelming. Is this allowed in muay thai? I remember an old post of Sylvie showing the burn marks of a fighter's face from his opponent's hair after a fight. Which seemed like a similar situation. I would hate entering a muay thai fight applying techniques that are illegal (and deemed uncivilised).
  4. This is something I reflected on a lot the past two years when I moved to Myanmar. I'm left-handed but orthodox. In lethwei the fight style is different, you don't strike and move back to original position, rather you move forward and strike and strike again whike going from southpawto orthodoxand to southpaw again. For example you do a jab cross left knee/kick (as orthodox) while doing your cross punch you move forward end up in southpaw position and knee/kick from southpaw stance (rather than do a switch knee or switch kick). And in lethwei you often practise both stances while doing pads. It doesnt look very elegant. But. The benefit for me has been injury control. I have one bad knee and being able to switch stance better has easened the pressure on my bad knee, I use both sides of my body in a more balanced manner. However it messes up balance and you need to learn how to place your feet correctly. But as injury prevention it's gold when I feel my bad knee and want to protect it from knee teeps, I switch stance. Maybe from a muay thai scoring point of view it doesn't make sense but for me to manage injuries and keep both sides of my body strong it's been great. Also good for confidence to learn Im strong in both stances.
  5. I used to be very aggressive on pads. But when I started sparring I just couldn't hit back. I only sparred with teachers who would not go hard but put a lot of pressure and I just frooze. Years back I was stalked and assaulted and I froze then too, begged for mercy. I realised, all that came back when I was once again in a situation where I had to enforce my physical boundaries. And the shame I felt for not protecting myself in the past all came up to the surface. Things that helped me: work with an older, patient male teacher that would give me space to hit back in my own time. And then also, get hit hard by a very aggressive girl with tonnes of experience. She headkicked me so my contact lens popped out and my ears rang but that physical sting, like real pain brought it out of me and instinctively I just hit back. My ex-husband also helped me with sparring, kicking me hard and getting me annoyed and aggressive with a person I trusted. And I broke that barrier slowly but surely. But for me it was a long emotional process of allowing myself to protect my physical space by hitting back, not just take it. Which has helped me enforce my mental barriers as well. Not sure if my advice applies to your specific situation, but I really feel you on this freezing thing and what effect it has on your confidence.
  6. Thank you for advice. The opponent's gym changed date again so I called the whole thing off and will wait for proper pro lethwei fight instead or possibly try to get a match in Thailand when I go back there in March.
  7. Yeah I want to avoid that situation of running after her. And I think they use lethwei KO timeout rules so opponent has 2 minutes to recover after being knocked down. A friend if mine recently fought under same hybrid rules, he had to knock the guy down 3 times before he got the win but he didn't know about it before. Oh I'm hearing so much stupidities about this fight. And from recent pics I see this girl is very very heavy right now. From what I reckon, she's actually not fight ready but it's good promotion for her gym to fight the only white fighter chick left in the country and she'll just go for a draw.
  8. I just found out this fight is KO or draw so I can't win on points. The thing is my opponent asked to increase weight to 3kg above my current weight. I agreed. Then she suddenly pulled out (people gossip to me "she ran away"). Which is weird because she is younger, heavier, has more fight experience and expected to be next lethwei female champ. I also know her gym as well, it's a modern gym with focus on technique. Her last fight she won knee KO first round (also smaller fighter). Anyhow I went training anyway after I was told my fight was off. Then I was told she changed her mind again and agreed to fight but at a different event 3 days earlier. Apparently this one is more low key with no videos. So I guess it's a great of losing face or whatever. So if the fight happens. I need to go for KO. But I've been told that if the opponent just runs away and KO is impossible, I should avoid a situation where I'm chasing her and instead just display technique. This will help me get respect even if it ends in a draw. People at my gym don't speak much English. My Ajarn has asked an interpreter to support me to understand. But still, most things I know about this fight is from people writing me giving me bits n pieces of information and I patch them together. Location of the fight is only shared shortly before "to avoid the mil. junta to get hold of the events and start messing around". Which adds another dimension to fighting 55. Anyhow the training for this fight is (exhausting) but super fun. I learnt a new way of blocking body kicks, for example like the diagonal block, but really throw your knee into your opponent's inner thigh.
  9. She made it to Phuket after a very long complicated journey and I met up with her there when I was visiting. She's training at Tiger Muay Thai and she'll fight on Muay Hardcore this Saturday against Nongbew. This will be a very difficult fight for her, considering Nongbews skills and I think Vero Nika only has around 20 fights against opponents from a lot less technically skilled pool. But let's see . Either way it's good for women fighting.
  10. Thank you so much @Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu this is incredibly helpful. As this is in a lethwei community (but lethwei fights not allowed now for reasons I don't understand fully) it seems like the lethwei style of blocking kicks with arms and focus on headkicks and punches to the head would help me. In my gym there is limited English knowledge and my Burmese is very limited as well. I have a friend who is part of the organisation of these fights I'll clarify with him. In my pads training now, I am barely asked to do body kicks (rather lethwei style crosskick) and it's almost 100% headkicks and they want me to do jumping knees (which I struggle with). They want me to switch stance a lot, attacking from both stances and move around more. So my thinking is, it will be more traditional kickboxing rules (based on what I understand from your post) rather than Muay Thai. On the advice on forward moving aggression: this helps a lot as well. I actually have no clue about the judges ability to score properly (unfortunately and without being disrespectful) which makes me a bit uncomfortable to use technique and I feel KO might be my best option. Sincere thanks for taking the time to explain!
  11. Hiya! Looks like I might have an upcoming fight soon. Rules are being negotiated, I have asked for elbows and MMA gloves but seems like it will be kickboxing rules with regular gloves. 3x3min rounds. Not sure how the scoring will be or if it's KO or draw so I'll go for KO. I don't really know how to fight kickboxing. I mean, we do it in sparring all the time but I see it as muay thai without elbows. I understand kickboxing is faster, limited clinching time, no elbows. More moving around. Any advice how to use a muay thai background and fight under kickboxing rules? I love clinch and elbows . My opponent is currently some kg heavier than me but a bit shorter, not sure if she'll lose weight. She has a lethwei and MMA background.
  12. One thing I wanted to mention is also us women understanding how much power we have and how hard we punch. I might be mistaken, but I feel sometimes women tend to go pretty hard because guys we spar with never want to admit when hurts. So we don't learn to assess our own strength in strikes.
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