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  1. I think there is / were a wellknown thai Muay grandmaster, whom went the alone way. He did learned by watching... He had never a rational training. After a time, he got work as assistant corner man, and used his time to observe closely and learn... So, if you observe and learn deeply enough, doing the mental visualisation too; half of the job is done... How to build up your physique, is next... But there are surely many ways and ideas.
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  2. I’m looking forward to reading your blog post. I think you make a good point about not just hearing peoples feedback but also reacting appropriately and thoughtfully. I am going into business with another person and I’ve made it clear that poor behavior will get someone shown the door. I also want to be proactive instead of reactive to all types of problems within gyms. I mentioned to Sylvie above but in regards to sparring, I think I would like to have a regular class that teaches people how to spar safely and respectfully that covers all the common problems, including the ones that are specific to men and women sparring with one another. Communication, safety, controlling power, keeping ego in check, making sure to let them know that speaking to the coach about an issue is always an option, how to be a good training partner with other genders, etc. Doing an on boarding seems like it might be a proactive step to prevent problems.
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  3. Thank you for advice. The opponent's gym changed date again so I called the whole thing off and will wait for proper pro lethwei fight instead or possibly try to get a match in Thailand when I go back there in March.
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  4. I can tell you the most important aspect of kickboxing.. Kickboxing is all about integrating your kicks and punches in a fluid, lyrical manner, such that your punches set up your kicks and your kicks set up your punches. Most individuals who try Kickboxing do it with their fists first, then walk around a bit before striking with their feet. They're kicking, then boxing; they're not doing Kickboxing. Mastering the ability to mix your kicks and punches in a smooth manner with right kickboxing gloves and Shin Pads , seamless way takes time and patience. If you stick with it, you'll soon be kicking and hitting like Chuck Norris!
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  5. Hi, My name is Jasper and I live in Brooklyn, New York. I am currently in the middle of making a boxing glove deodorizer and I'd love everyone's opinion on this forum. Just have a couple of questions and pictures. - Among Fresh Linen, Mint, and Lemon which would you prefer the most? I have some final product pictures if you don't mind taking a look. You can check out the final product picture on my business instagram or this imgur link. https://www.instagram.com/iozakcombat/ https://imgur.com/a/EdMUyV7 Let me know what you guys think! I will be launching in February so If anyone is interested I am offering discounts just follow my instagram and DM me. Thank you!
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  6. Yeah I want to avoid that situation of running after her. And I think they use lethwei KO timeout rules so opponent has 2 minutes to recover after being knocked down. A friend if mine recently fought under same hybrid rules, he had to knock the guy down 3 times before he got the win but he didn't know about it before. Oh I'm hearing so much stupidities about this fight. And from recent pics I see this girl is very very heavy right now. From what I reckon, she's actually not fight ready but it's good promotion for her gym to fight the only white fighter chick left in the country and she'll just go for a draw.
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  7. I once saw a peculiar match. Blue was inferior, so she fled to the corner and took her last stance there. holding desperately a high guard. Red was furiously attacking and punching forcefully the whole time, although most of the punches of course were caught in the desperate but good guard. Blue managed with just barely a couple of counter strikes, which did hit. to my surprise, the rond (match?) was decided as draw. Huh? Easy, It wasnt Muay, it was with kickboxing rules... Where there is essentially boxing rules. Being dominating doesnt count, what counts is clean hits; and punches do score. So, Red was overhelmingly dominating, but got none extra points for this.. She had lotsa of punches, but most fastened on the guard, just a few clean hits.... While Blue did managed to hit a couple of times... Ergo draw. A side note. This reminds me about an european fotboll "soccer" match between England and Poland on Wembley, which is Englands national arena in London; about 1974. The english had a massive dominance. Lotsa shots on goal. The polish goalkeeper Tomaszewski was a hero.... Took lotsa of shots! Even a couple of punishment shots! Just one goal went in... And the poles manages with the trick; they managed to send a ball forward; and Lubanski run through whole field, driving the ball with him forward. 1-1!!! A draw! History made! Poland to the World Championship, where they took a good and popular third place. Thus, compare kickboxing with soccer...
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  9. I just found out this fight is KO or draw so I can't win on points. The thing is my opponent asked to increase weight to 3kg above my current weight. I agreed. Then she suddenly pulled out (people gossip to me "she ran away"). Which is weird because she is younger, heavier, has more fight experience and expected to be next lethwei female champ. I also know her gym as well, it's a modern gym with focus on technique. Her last fight she won knee KO first round (also smaller fighter). Anyhow I went training anyway after I was told my fight was off. Then I was told she changed her mind again and agreed to fight but at a different event 3 days earlier. Apparently this one is more low key with no videos. So I guess it's a great of losing face or whatever. So if the fight happens. I need to go for KO. But I've been told that if the opponent just runs away and KO is impossible, I should avoid a situation where I'm chasing her and instead just display technique. This will help me get respect even if it ends in a draw. People at my gym don't speak much English. My Ajarn has asked an interpreter to support me to understand. But still, most things I know about this fight is from people writing me giving me bits n pieces of information and I patch them together. Location of the fight is only shared shortly before "to avoid the mil. junta to get hold of the events and start messing around". Which adds another dimension to fighting 55. Anyhow the training for this fight is (exhausting) but super fun. I learnt a new way of blocking body kicks, for example like the diagonal block, but really throw your knee into your opponent's inner thigh.
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  10. She made it to Phuket after a very long complicated journey and I met up with her there when I was visiting. She's training at Tiger Muay Thai and she'll fight on Muay Hardcore this Saturday against Nongbew. This will be a very difficult fight for her, considering Nongbews skills and I think Vero Nika only has around 20 fights against opponents from a lot less technically skilled pool. But let's see . Either way it's good for women fighting.
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  11. Hello! I started training Muay Thai this summer and found that I really loved to train. So far I have attended Thai pad classes and Bag classes. I haven't been able to train in a gym since September because I am taking a service/volunteer year traveling around The United States and I won't be home in my region until August 2022. I want to keep pursuing Muay Thai but I am having a hard time deciding what my focus should be as I have little to no access to gyms and trainers. As of right now I spend time exercising, shadow boxing, and reading through the Muay Thai library. Does anyone have any suggestions on what else I should do to stay engaged in Muay Thai? Thank you for any feedback I greatly appreciate it!
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  12. Thank you for this! I appreciate the words!
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  13. Fighters may attack their opponent with punches and kicks, including strikes below the waist, with the exception of the groin. Elbows and knees are not permitted. Clinch fighting, throws, and sweeps are all prohibited.
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  14. I might also posit, and will later contribute more to the discussion when I have more time, that this understanding of overlapping precepts between Stoicism and Buddhism, such as patience, temperance, control, Self knowledge etc.... has its root in core virtue. To over simplify a bit for the purpose of this point, both Christ and Buddha taught many things but had a central aspect and pinnacle for which they taught. Buddha is recognized as the embodiment of compassion and Christ the embodiment of forgiveness. The reason that compassion and forgiveness are central to those doctrines is because we are human and those are the hardest lessons in life. They are the most difficult principles we struggle with to reconcile. I would assert that to truly revere Life, including that of your opponent, is by being a living embodiment of those principles. I have found that the study of fighting has vastly increased my own compassion and forgiveness towards others. This is why teachers matter. For me, to witness tis in a fighting master, it demonstrates dedication, self mastery and humanity in a person fired, tempered, cooled and sharpened in the crucible of life. Because of this warrior spirit and solidarity, you have the CHOICE to teach without ego. There is no freedom of choice without discipline. As humans, we all have the tendency to pick up the sword. When the fighting is done and the battle is laid down, this is the story of swords turned to ploughs.
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  15. The famed trainer of Mike Tyson Cus D'Amato had a spectacular theory on what made fighters tired. Fear: “Fear is the greatest obstacle to learning in any area, but particularly in boxing. For example, boxing is something you learn through repetition. You do it over and over and suddenly you’ve got it. …However, in the course of trying to learn, if you get hit and get hurt, this makes you cautious, and when you’re cautious you can’t repeat it, and when you can’t repeat it, it’s going to delay the learning process…When they…come up to the gym and say I want to be a fighter, the first thing I’d do was talk to them about fear…” “The next thing I do, I get them in excellent condition….Knowing how the mind is and the tricks it plays on a person and how an individual will always look to avoid a confrontation with something that is intimidating, I remove all possible excuses they’re going to have before they get in there. By getting them in excellent condition, they can’t say when they get tired that they’re not in shape. When they’re in excellent shape I put them into the ring to box for the first time, usually with an experience fighter who won’t take advantage of them. When the novice throws punches and nothing happens, and his opponent keeps coming at him…the new fighter becomes panicky. When he gets panicky he wants to quit, but he can’t quit because his whole psychology from the time he’s first been in the streets is to condemn a person who’s yellow. So what does he do? He gets tired. This is what happens to fighters in the ring. They get tired. This is what happens to fighters in the ring. They get tired, because they’re getting afraid….Now that he gets tired, people can’t call him yellow. He’s just too “tired” to go on. But let that same fighter strike back wildly with a visible effect on the opponent and suddenly that tired, exhausted guy becomes a tiger….It’s a psychological fatigue, that’s all it is. But people in boxing don’t understand that.” …[Heller, 61] Trainer of one of the most vicious and entertaining knockout artists in modern boxing reveals how it is fear that can drive the knockout. One of the more inscrutable aspects of Thailand's traditional Muay Thai is that classically the knockout is seldom chased. There have been a handful of knockout artists, but the most esteemed fighters, legends of the sport were not knockout fighters. You'd see an elite fighter with 120 fights against top tier competition and maybe 10 or 12 KOs. In the West we thirst for the knockout. It's practically the entire entertainment goal of watching fighting. Highlight cut-ups are filled with starchings. It's the porn of fighting. Why do Thais - who by many measures make up some of the most skilled fighters in combat sports - not esteem the knockout? A large measure of this is that aggression is not viewed in the same way in Buddhistic Thailand as it is viewed in other cultures. It lacks self-control, a big aesthetic dimension of traditional Muay Thai is the exercise of oneself. But I turn to Cus D'amato's quote because I ran into a very interesting passage on the boxing of antiquity. The Greek orator Dio Chrysostom (c. 40 – c. 115 AD) is describing the virtues of the undefeated boxer Melancolmas. And one of the things that really struct me was that he claimed that knocking out an opponent was an act of cowardice. A fear of endurance: source notes linked Nearly 2,000 years ago in Hellenic Greece the same equation of fear, fatigue and aggression that Cus D'amato harnessed to produce the great Mike Tyson, was already understood, but fell in another light. The rule set of Greek boxing appears to have favored defensive fighting, and depending on your source, either consisted of a boxer fighting multiple opponents in succession, or fighting one opponent until collapse or relent. The fear and fatigue, the prospect of endurance was real and heightened. The praise for Melancomas was that he never took the easy way out and sought to end the fight, the test of himself, to end the fear by knocking his opponent out. It was rather through mastery of his opponent - and himself - that he would win. In the mouth of Chysostom we also find the aesthetic of Thailand's femeu fighter. He is the fighter who masters both himself and the space, and produces a victory out of the crumbling of his opponent's character. He chooses defeat, or collapses under the weight of its inescapability. When I read this I was quite struck, even feeling that I had never quite thought about this before, but somewhere in my mind it must have been registering that I had all the related thoughts that make this up, because I also stumbled on an old essay I wrote about how knockouts can feel like they have taken the "cheap" way out: you can read that essay here "Shame and Why Fighting Signals the Glue of What Holds Us Together" What's telling is that both Cus D'Amato and Chrysostom believe the same thing. Fear rises and the fighter is looking for a way out. Cus directs that fear into an instinct to end it all with a KO, Hellenistic Greece 2,000 years ago - and in many quarters of Thailand's traditional Muay Femeu greatness - counted the endurance of that fear, and its resolve through self control, and the control of the opponent as the greater art of fighting. This coincidence of fight philosophy came out of my research into the Terme Boxer, or The Boxer at Rest. A bronze sculpture of a boxer who has been bloodied and scarred by the endurance of his match. Contrary to the Greek classic ideal of the Apollonian athlete, depicted as standing, flawless and physically beautiful, this statue embraces the realism of the boxer 2,000 years ago. Scholars are not entirely sure why he is so realistically shown, but some feel that it was in answer to an over indulgence, an eros, in the image of the untouched boxer. Some feel that the sculpture depicts in inner beauty of a man facing that fear and enduring it, overcoming himself: What is interesting is that if the fighting arts / sports are to have culture value beyond the sheer visceral release of watching people get starched, some semblance of the idea that the knockout is an act of cowardice needs to take hold. Some sense in which "just wanting to end this thing" might be looking for a way out. We are conditioned to feel that the retreating fighter is the cowardly one, and we can certainly understand how that might be so. But perhaps best is to understand that there are two exits from the fear, one in disengagement, and the other in trying to cut it short through sudden violence. If a fighter is being forged like a blade, it's the lasting presence in the heat which creates the transformation and the perfection of the steel.
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  16. I should add to the run of thoughts above something I've written about elsewhere. The irony of the built in bias against aggression for its own sake is that Thailand's Muay Thai has produced some of the most skilled, aggressive, stalking fighters in combat sport history. But it doesn't do this through being biased for aggression. It actually does it through its opposite. Because defensive, countering, controlling fighters have traditionally had a scoring bias IF you were an aggressive, dern fighter you had to be very skilled, and effectively aggressive. You had a hill to climb on the scorecard, and do it against highly evolved defensive fighters. As The Bull to the favored Matador, you had to be a very good bull. It's more complicated than this, in that there is not just "one" Muay Thai in Thailand, and I do believe there is almost ideological struggle over ideal representations of excellence (the rural tough guy vs the Bangkok artful guy for instance), but there has been this tension within Muay Thai developed through its Buddhistic perspective on aggression. It's for this reason that we like to say that Muay Thai isn't about aggression, it's about dominance. And there are many ways of being dominant, especially in a scoring aesthetic that praises self control and the control of the opponent. I write this as the husband of a fighter who is a dern, forward-fighting Muay Khao fighter who has fought in the country more times than any other westerner (260), and has lost many, many times to the retreating, defensive fighter who held the scoring bias. Instead of feeling that the scoring wasn't "fair" (ie, Western, or non-Thai) we came to thoroughly embrace it and admire it as beautiful. The advancing fighter holds an extra scoring burden because of how aggression is viewed. It's a puzzle to be solved and brings out much greater possibilities in the aggressive fighter. This feels right to the sport and art of Thailand's Muay Thai.
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  17. This really wasn't meant to be about Mike Tyson per se. It just so happened that the beautiful, insightful quote came from his formative trainer, and Mike practically embodies the quick KO fighter. It all came together in a brief space of the writing. But I would never say that Mike Tyson was unskilled. He was spectacularly skilled. In fact Teddy Atlas in his criticism says the same thing. The younger version of him is one of my favorite fighters to watch, and he's inspiring. Sylvie's even stolen from him a bit. This is really about notions of the acme of the sport, what some might say is the deeper value of it as an art, or a meaningful practice beyond that of sheer entertainment. I've written about Thailand's Muay Thai as an artful in the article linked below. The example of Mike though, as a fighter who admittedly came from fear, makes a good wedge into the ideas that are opened up here. It isn't that there shouldn't be KOs, or that there shouldn't be aggression. In fact much of Golden Age Muay Thai was founded on the contrast between "The Bull" (an aggressive fighter, Muay Khao or Muay Maat) and "The Matador" (Muay Femeu). Traditional Muay Thai excellence requires aggression in its pairing. But...the acme fighter isn't The Bull. The acme fighter is the artful, technical fighter who can control The Bull. The concept isn't completely foreign to Western combat sports. Tough guy Rocky Marciano vs silky smooth Sugar Ray Robinson. Everyone understands that dichotomy. What the Ancient Greek orator Chrysostom is talking about in his elegy is an acme image of a fighter, the idea of a beautiful boxer, a boxer who embodies qualities beyond those of his skill set. Noble qualities. He ideally endures the test of fire of the battle, the possibility of loss, and does not seek to end it prematurely. He seeks to crumble his opponent, almost from within, like kicking out the legs of a table. Chrysostom is setting up a hierarchy between this ideal fighter, and other Ancient Greek boxers who were surely incredibly tough. If we wanted to do similarly in western boxing (which unlike Muay Thai does celebrate the knockout as a pure virtue) we might compare sleek footed Ali who won extremely arduous battles, yet was quite artful vs explosive Mike. There have been lots of heavy handed knockout fighters in traditional Muay Thai, many of them celebrated. But the idea that is opened up is that broadly, in traditional Muay Thai the knockout is not hunted for its own sake. It is not a virtue unto itself. If you gain dominance in the 4th round and weaken your opponent, you don't go and chase them into the corner in the 5th round and end them. A fundamental part of this is because of how aggression is viewed, and that there are aspects of the sport which go towards the values of art, and ideals of the perfection of oneself. Where I have written on Thailand's Muay Thai as art:
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  18. Thanks for the reply. I agree with you on the buddhistic herritage of seing agression as weaknes, all though to me it seem more like agression out of control. And sometimes I feel we westerners have a bit too romantic and classic view on thai society and culture. All though I know you live it and know it well. Rodtang for instance, a huge name in the biggest stadiums in Thailand. Probably because of his agression and K.O abillity. And for Tyson, maybe it was his fear that made him so agressive, but it had to be power and technique landing those K.Os. He has become a very humble and smart man indeed, so naturaly he will be a great self critic. Thank you again for answering. Big fan
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  19. You're welcome, I hope you find them interesting, there is a good academic book or article about Stoicism and fighting but I haven't been able to find it. I'm not very knowledgeable about Buddhism but from what I know that would totally make sense. It is interesting to think of how much European or Western ideas of what makes a 'good' fight/fighter have shifted from what might be considered the 'roots' of Western combat sports.
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  20. Yes, very much so. Which brings us to perhaps a coincidence of how both Stoicism and Buddhism treat or have programs of self-control. I suspect that the real reason that Dio Chrysostom can speak to virtues that approximate scoring tendencies in traditional Muay Thai 2000 years later is that Thailand's Muay Thai is Buddhistic. So what we are really seeing is that Stoicism (and other Hellenic aesthetics) and Buddhism share a perspective on human affects, especially those of anger and aggression. Thanks for the links, I'll enjoy looking through them. Attached is the article: Athletic Beauty as Mimēsis of Virtue The Case of the Beautiful Boxer which talks about the prevalent social and philosophical attitudes around boxing in the era of The Terme Boxer. Athletic Beauty as Mimēsis of Virtue The Case of the Beautiful Boxer.pdf
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  21. Really interesting article, following on from your discussion on the aesthetic and values of boxing in the Greco-Roman world, I think that the reason there is some overlap between how people in Antiquity thought about combat Sports and how Thais view Muay Thai might come down to the prevalence of Stoic philosophical values in the ancient world (particularly in Rome) which prized virtues such as self-control (temperantia). The idea of Stoic ethics often being to deny, remove, or overcome negative emotions (like fear, or anger) and impulses which they saw as illusory and due to misunderstanding or failing to anticipate a situation. Stoic philosophers had lots to say about combat sports and often used it in analogies when describing philosophical concepts. I haven't done much research into this yet but this may have been because the nature of ancient Boxing or Pankration had coincidental overlap with Stoicism, perhaps Stoic philosophy and it's prevalence in the Ancient world had an influence on how combat sports were conducted, or even that because of the popularity of combat sports in Antiquity made them an easy subject to use when communicating complex ideas. Here are some interesting links to some articles on Stoicism and ancient fighting. https://medium.com/the-stoic-within/simple-stoic-advice-61005b969540 https://medium.com/stoicism-philosophy-as-a-way-of-life/stoicism-as-a-martial-art-3ab9302071f9 https://medium.com/stoicism-philosophy-as-a-way-of-life/the-fighting-philosophy-of-cleanthes-of-assos-8a399416337d https://modernstoicism.com/on-anger-and-impulse-control-in-boxing/
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  22. There is a topic that I’ve been hoping to discuss recently regarding my own personal experiences and those that I’ve heard about from other women. My experience at multiple gyms as well as the one where I currently train, is there is a “boys club” that exists and creates a certain barrier for women who train. I’ve only trained in the US, so that is my frame of reference for gym culture. A (male) business partner and I are hoping to open a gym in the near future. I’m hoping that this discussion will help inform the culture we create as well as improve the approach of current gyms. I’ve noticed more than one coach almost entirely ignore women who train either as beginners or experienced fighters. Men are given more attention in terms of coaching, encouragement, and feedback. I’ve also observed that women, myself included, seem to get excluded from conversations, condescended to, have borderline or blatant sexist comments directed toward them, and assumptions being make about fighting knowledge as well no matter the level of experience. Other than power level, there have only been a handful of times where experienced being treated differently in sparring. I’m not sure if that’s a common experience for other women or not. This question is addressed to other women who train. What is your experience in this regard? Have you felt that this was common in gyms where you have trained? Do you feel like it slowed down your progress with learning? How do you think the gym culture can be improved so women become more skilled? I’m asking men, respectfully, to refrain from saying things along the lines of “That doesn’t happen” or “women are being too sensitive”. You are welcome to constructively participate in the conversation and ask questions but please do not deny that other people experience things. Men, please be respectful and measured in your responses. I'm placing this here instead of in the women’s only forum because I feel it’s important for all people to read and consider these observations. It’s important for the growth of the sport and for women to have better experiences in the gym.
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  23. It depends on if it is just modified Muay Thai (limiting weapons and changing the way aggression is scored) or if it is technically Kickboxing, as in scored as the sport is commonly scored. If the judges are scoring for kickboxing, as a sport, there are some very big differences. The most important one is that in kickboxing you can take kicks on your arms and they don't score, including head kicks. These are some of the most dependable points in Muay Thai and they are more or less null in Kickboxing. This means your upper body guard is important. It also means that attacks to the lower body can score higher in Kickboxing than in Muay Thai (where low kicks only score if they contort the opponent). The graphic below shows some of this. It's not 100% as head shots in Kickboxing score highly when not blocked. Also, broadly, punches score much higher in Kickboxing. At least that's my sense of it. Also, forward pressure is much better regarded in Kickboxing than it is in traditional Muay Thai. Short advice: pressure, throw in combinations, mix in lots of low kicks, maintain a strong upper body guard, punch more than mid-kick.
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  24. Also important, the Yodkhunpon shadowboxing session: #104 Yodkhunpon Sittraipum - The Art of Shadowboxing (64 min) watch it here Some have said this is one of the favorite sessions in all the Library. It's very rare to get detailed instruction and advice on How to Shadowboxing, let alone from a great fighter fo the past. This is a FULL hour of how to shadowbox, learn with me as I learn from The Elbow Hunter of 100 Stitches Yodkhunpon, the greatest Elbow Fighter in Thai history.
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  25. Here is Sylvie's quick vlog on "how to punch with a loose hand": You can also study Neung's boxing style in the Muay Thai Library: #71 Napapol Giatsakchokchai - Powerful Boxing For Muay Thai (81 min) watch it here Nothing is a better match than world class boxing added to fundamentally sound Muay Thai. Napadol was one of the best western boxers in all of Thailand, a WBC champion, and he teaches a gorgeous, powerful boxer's technique that is easily married to Muay Thai.
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  26. That's also a very useful information!!! I'm at the same point... Thank you so much!!
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  27. On Saturday there was a fight between American fighter Ongjen Topic, fighting out of P.K. Saenchaigym and Chalawan, who was formerly training with Attachai Muay Thai Gym but has been inactive (got married, moved down South) for the past 3 years since winning a Rajadamnern Stadium title. The very short version goes like this: Ongjen got counted in round 3 and, coincidentally the live TV broadcast cut off after that round (just a coincidence of time). The rest of the fight was only seen by those in the stadium or those who had some kind of online feed. In round 5, Chalawan was counted during a skirmish and then Ongjen was also knocked down but wasn't counted by the ref during a similar skirmish. Ongjen won on points and a very well-known gambler actually jumped into the ring to protest the decision. It was crazy and video/photos of it were everywhere. Here's the 5th round: https://www.facebook.com/watch/?extid=CL-UNK-UNK-UNK-AN_GK0T-GK1C&v=1368466243610995 The gambler's complaint was that the referee had unfairly not counted Topic, basically handing the round to him. Had the referee counted Topic for what was pretty much the same kind of knock down/slip that he'd counted Chalawan for, the round would have been even. On the scorecards, the 3rd was 10-8 for Chalawan and the 5th, because Topic wasn't counted, was 10-8 for Topic. There have been countless updates, videos, explanations and comments on this issue over the past few days. Mainly, there are comments saying Topic won the fight anyway through his strategy and using "more weapons" than Chalawan, so the point about the count is moot. Others are saying the ref counting Chalawan and not Topic in round 5 is clearly cheating. And even more than either of those are people sighing and saying that the gambler jumping into the ring to protest, the argument over the count, the accusations of cheating are all together something we have come to expect from nearly every fight card and this will be the end of Muay Thai. What the people who actually have a say in this are saying is that the referee has taken responsibility and come out to say that he made a mistake in not counting Topic in round 5. There will be a meeting with Sia Moo, the head of Omnoi Stadium, where this fight took place, as well as the referees and judges, to discuss this mistake. They will not, however, be changing the result of the fight (which would cancel the bets, so the gambler who jumped in the ring is not getting what he wanted). There was also a stern warning from Sia Moo that if gamblers behave like this, storming the ring, he will simply no longer allow gamblers to enter the stadium at all, which is what Lumpinee has done in their most recent incarnation. Here's the fight in full so you can watch for yourselves. I was watching on TV and thought Chalawan's response to nearly knocking out Ongjen in round 3 was... bizarre. But, he hasn't fought in a long time and I do know that sometimes you don't know how close your opponent is to being done when everyone outside is screaming at you because they can see the affects that you can't... so, my view is just my view from watching TV. Ongjen was absolutely the more busy fighter, Chalawan is more accurate and more on balance; we're at a time in Muay Thai's scoring transformation that I don't know how judges favor those very different aesthetics, but the scorecards for this one are a pretty clear indication. Full fight, introduced by Mister Pong (a very famous sport reporter and announcer):
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  28. "Tiredness makes a coward of us all" adorned our gym wall.. Perhaps the opposite is true?
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  29. Hello to all the Nak Muay. I have been practicing Muay Thai for few years, I have always admired those fighters able have a strong body/stamina when come to practice and fight. So few years back then, I tried to register a semi pro fight, it is a great and worst experience to me throughout my life hahahah, I enjoyed and suffered a lot during the process. Since I was not a great athlete and my first time. I get a lot of injuries/sprain throughout my training, which lead to my main topic here, how did you recover/ heal your injuries during the training and post-fight? I had been carrying the injuries for few years and I went for few acupuncture sections and massage. It partially help, but does not fully recover from how I used to be. The injuries limited my strength and movement and became a burden even a stretching. Please kindly advice/share me your experiences, I wish to get rid of it. Thank you
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  30. The technique is the focus in martial arts, just power will not do you any good without proper technique. Actually, these two are connected, the required power in your strikes will not come until your technique is not correct. Proper technique is the base of generates power. Learning your techniques properly will not only improve your striking and generate power in the strikes but also make you avoid injury. With so much training and precise measurements taken with time the techniques, you are learning become second nature. This makes your body move on its own, thus avoid injuries. Of course, you are depending on your trainer for that. Trainers and instructors have reached the apex where they are suitable enough to teach you. Meaning, your grooming and how you will perform deeply depends on the instructor and you should choose the one that has such qualities.
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  31. A possible try is with a friendly cat! Its an old house cure cat skin is good for rheumatism. The fact is, an alive, friendly cat, is even better!!! What is, you must have a cat whom likes to sleep on you... OK, a lesser known fact, is cats and their purring helps also to heal fractures and sprains. These are oh so common with hard training athlethes and - of course - fighters... There are even scientific studies telling the cat purring is in a frequence near the ideal for helping bone fissures to heal... Its possible a loving, friendly dog could do something similiar... But this is speculation. On cats Im fairly sure. In both cases a good bet is to take care of a cat / dog whom is it pity about. From a high kill shelter; or a homeless whom seeks your help. It helps much your karma, and it may help up your health.
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  32. Thx for the insights. One comment. The phenomena I did featured in bold... This is not about you, this is about the alone girl / woman in that gym. Here is she alone, eager to train, but more or less aside... If nothing else, she is the alone woman. And suddenly there comes in another adult woman! They want to give their member a positive experience, to be able to met and train with another woman if and when the occasion arises.... Of course, if you are a paying guest, its not necessarily YOUR problem. But. Hey, what do I know, they perhaps even thinks you are in a similar situation? Alone woman in YOUR gym? Anyways, its a problem with several bottoms. I dont know if its customary to phone the owner / coach / host and tell whom you are and what type of train you do wish. Or the owner / host meets the new face and asks... Its done in some of bridge clubs for example: " I wish to visit your club tonight, and will be happy to get a good partner to play with. I consider myself as an expert." Another proposal I fancy is to have labels to put on: Beginner medium, advanced and Mostly fitness (=take it easy in sparring) (Fighter = Im OK with quite rough sparring too), but as I know, this is not done. Ps. Nay, Im not into active martial arts myself; although I did some other sports, including bridge and riding.
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  33. Thanks for asking. My left shin still has a bubble of fluid, shin not too sore. Right shin is even better, hardly and fluid and 1/10 for soreness. Little hard bumps on the shin bones still. I try to rub a glass bottle down them daily to smooth it out.
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  34. Shadow fighting is a very useful part of training.
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  35. I have the honor of training under a professional Muay Thai boxer here in the US. He is here from Thailand to coach and lead classes at my gym and he does an amazing job. He is an awesome coach but does not speak a word of English. Despite this, he communicates very well through body language, demonstration, and very minimal English. He has a hilariously goofy yet extremely disciplined personality which is common among Thai boxers. Occasionally I will say things in Thai that I get from Google Translate, and despite it being broken, off-tone Thai language, his eyes still light up and and is happy to finally hear his home language in the states. I am wondering, what are some ways to learn easy small talk with him, even if it’s just about training, so that he gets to hear and use his native language while he’s working here? What are some phrases are cordials that we normally exchange in the English language that I could say in Thai? For instance, things like “heys how’s it going?” Or “what’s up man” (hearing him yell WASSAP MAAAAN is actually very funny, I don’t think he knows what it really means) don’t really translate well. I have been saying “saba di mai?” Which is the equivalent of how are you and he always gets a kick of that, and says “very good Thai!” ( he’s too nice ) anyways I figure this is a good place to ask.
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  36. Thank you for this feedback. I think the communication aspect of creating a respectful training environment is very often overlooked. Encouraging people, especially people new to the sport and to the gym, to express their level of comfort with their training, sparring, etc. I specifically want create an environment that is encouraging and firm when new people are brought in. “Firm” meaning even if you are experienced in the sport doesn’t mean an automatic green light for being set loose. And also for people new to the sport to know that it’s okay to be nervous. And also to be aware that nervousness can lead to some poor choices when new to sparring and create problems unnecessarily. And as you said, this needs to happen across all genders. I was even thinking about having a required session *just* to coach people on how to spar safely, address safety issues for injuries, adjust power levels, communicate respectfully with training partners, etc before new people are permitted to participate. I think this will help all members but especially women who may feel uncomfortable without these guidelines specifically spelled out. Women being able to come to trainers, coaches, and me as the owner and know that they will be heard if something doesn’t feel quite right or if something happened that makes them feel unsafe is huge. That’s a great part to focus on so thank you for that!
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  37. One thing I wanted to mention is also us women understanding how much power we have and how hard we punch. I might be mistaken, but I feel sometimes women tend to go pretty hard because guys we spar with never want to admit when hurts. So we don't learn to assess our own strength in strikes.
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  38. I did want to come back to you because it can be difficult to recognize our own thought processes, which result in our feelings, because many of them come from unconscious conditioning. One element I see repeated by men is this notion that "hitting women" is wrong. How could that be a bad thing? I think a good way to address this feeling in yourself is understanding the difference between trained skills and practice, versus violence. My mom struggled with my fighting for a long time because she views it as violence. I've experienced what I call violence, which involves a victim and is more or less one-sided. That's not what sports or artforms are. I wrote about it here if you want to read about the differences I see (https://8limbsus.com/blog/violence-fighting-silence-speaking-of-rape-muay-thai) but the short, short takeaway you can start straight away with is looking at how many women have expressed offense and disappointment by their male training partners refusing to hit them... that's obviously not the same thing as "hitting women," and obviously we're not experiencing sparring that way.
    1 point
  39. What you're describing is internalized sexism. So, you deal with that. It's not your "fault" and it doesn't make you bad, but you do have to acknowledge and recognize it first and foremost in order to go about addressing it. Women aren't children. Women aren't weak and unable to make decisions for ourselves. Women go to sparring for the same reasons men do, to be challenged, to improve, to experience pressure. By giving priority to your discomfort, you are robbing your teammates of all those benefits. Be generous, just as you would for a male teammate. Note size difference and skill disparity and make adjustments for those, just as you would for a male teammate. Also, thank you for asking this, as it demonstrates you do care and want to do better for your teammates.
    1 point
  40. What would be good etiquette if, as a man, the reason for this attitude during sparring (or any other sort of intense pair training) is mental discomfort with the idea of throwing even mid-level strikes with women? I've found myself paired with girls and it is quite uncomfortable to try and disregard this cultural norm. I did that exact thing described of just using defence and letting the girls work their offence during these routine 'colosseum' exercises (I forget the English term for it) at a gym I trained at, where the instructor would make one of us (sometimes a woman) do rounds with almost everyone at a time. It wasn't supposed to be sparring, but eventually the one doing the rounds would get tired and more desperate, so they'd put more behind their strikes and, between men at least, you'd end up reciprocating with similar intensity. I use this example because, even if you oppose to being a sparring partner for a female (if your instructor lets you, that is), you might find yourself in a situation where you'll basically be doing light sparring with them, and might adjust your power a bit too low for those that want to be treated equally. Sorry if this is a bit of a convoluted question, but basically I wanted to take the chance (and please do excuse me if I'm unknowingly derailing the topic of conversation) to ask what you think would be the right procedure for males that just feel uncomfortable hitting females but nonetheless get thrown in situations where you have to be available for them and actually want to help them improve their skills in any other way you can (as you would with any other training partner, since that's obviously the idea- to get better together). Thanks!
    1 point
  41. I've been training (US-based) for about 5-6 years. I was lucky to have the option of finding gyms that weren't sexist in the ways you described, but in visiting other gyms or trying other gyms to potentially join I have experienced a lot of sexism. In the US, I'm considered a fairly experienced amateur fighter with 21 fights, but when I visit other gyms I almost invariably get paired with the only other woman in the gym, regardless of size or skill level. This drives me nuts, because I'd much rather have a partner with comparable skill - whether that person be male or female! It also poses a problem as sometimes there are men more appropriately sized to work with me, when I'll get paired with a much larger woman. Combine that with a skill discrepancy, and it makes me feel like I'm only good enough "for a girl" and not to train with the majority of the fighters. In sparring, I get a lot of guys trying to go light on me but they go so light that they're basically shadow boxing or going super slow. If I pick up the intensity, sometimes they get mad and try to hurt me. Neither is beneficial. I also get a lot of those guys that just shell-up and say "hit me, hit me!" and (maybe this is just me) I find this super condescending because if I wanted to just hit something that doesn't move I'd hit a bag. In some cases, I've asked coaches (that I'm more familiar with) "hey, you paired me with her, but I think this other person would be a better match based on skill and/or size." In my own gym, I try to take my turn teaching newer people how to hit and hold pads - we all have to learn. But when I'm paying to drop in at another gym, I am paying to work, not teach their new students to hold pads. The biggest thing I've learned is just to advocate for myself. It's really hard, and the response isn't always what we want but I find that 95% of the time people don't realize they're behaving in a sexist way and didn't realize how you interpreted what they did. Sometimes I've been given really thoughtful reasons why I was partnered up the way I was, too - trying to inspire a student who's expressed interest in fighting by letting them work with a fighter who "looks" like them. As for the "boys club" part of it, sometimes I find this. I always ask myself if I really want to be in that club. If yes, I assert myself. If I have valuable knowledge, I put it forward. Sometimes though, I can see that this is a group I don't care to be part of and I have no problem just walking away. I'm happy to share my thoughts if they ask, but unconcerned if they don't and that they don't consider me one of them. Many gyms have cliques and sometimes those cliques are all-encompassing. I'm not trying to join a Muay Thai cult - just train and fight and make some friends. I hope this helps!
    1 point
  42. One of the more difficult and hidden aspects of gender gym dynamics that I've noticed is that because Muay Thai gyms are almost always male coded spaces it can be that there is a limited amount of social capital that women receive. That is to say, some women will get a desired amount of attention - the quality or kind of this attention may vary by gym - but because this is set up as inherently scarce, women will be even unconsciously forced into competing over that scarcity. This means that other women in the gym who may be more natural allies, making one feel more comfortable or at home, persons of support, inspiration or encouragement, actually become your competitors over "being authentic" or "being treated like a fighter" or even just "the coach pays attention to me". One woman may feel that the gym is pretty fair and supportive of women, because she's competed over the limited resource and won it, but other women may not. I'm not really sure what the answer to this is, other than being really sensitive to the idea that there may be hidden limitations of social capital. It can be very difficult, because a lot of what coaches can do is set up a scarcity in the first place, to motivate students. "I'll pay attention to you if you do it right", "I'll pay attention to you if you work really hard" "I'll pay attention to you if you show toughness". This leads to some very earnest women over-performing, or out-performing males in a space. They want to earn their rightful place in a male coded environment. But, this scarcity which should be a equally distributed scarcity also really easily can become quite gendered. That is to say: it's much more scarce for women than it is for men. In some gyms men will just take for granted something that women end up competing with other women for. Men compete with each other and will tend to bond. Women may experience competition with other women differently. Sylvie's talked about this female competition in the gym space a few times.
    1 point
  43. I'm not sure how those cheering on the "throw them out" rule don't see that the rule actually can create even LESS engagement. Maybe there is a missing piece of information, but if I'm a fighter going into the 5th round and down big in the odds, there is almost every incentive not to engage and purposively try to get the fight called off, especially if there is sizeable money bet on me. Everyone who bet on me, including my own gym, would keep their money. The losing fighter wins when a fight is called off. This puts the fighter with a big lead in a very difficult position as well.
    1 point
  44. The best you can do without trainer first is (in my opinion): "Skipping Rope". Other than a jump rope and some space, you do not need much to do this exercise while your life is on pause. Skipping rope helps you warm up before you go on to more rigorous exercises. It also strengthens your feet and ankles, which will make them more resilient to injury while kicking. ONE Super Series standout Superlek “The Kicking Machine” Kiatmoo9 points out a few other benefits. “Skipping helps strengthen our bones,” he says. “It also helps us concentrate because we must focus on the rhythm of the movement of our feet as our hand spins the rope continuously. This also helps our brain and nerve function, if done regularly. Over time, our various organs will work more harmoniously. ”If you do not have a jump rope, you can get some of the same benefits from mimicking the movements.
    1 point
  45. Hope she makes it over to Thailand ok. Keep us updated
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  46. For me the trickiest part of shadow kicks is that a target actually interrupts the overall trajectory, so not hitting anything kind of makes the balance difficult. If your kicks on pads and the bag are fine, I recommend kicking a few times, then just back up so you "miss" the target and try to throw your kick exactly the same as when you hit the target and see what that looks/feels like. Then you can recreate it and do it a gazillian times.
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