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  1. Thank you for this! I will use this when I need to!
    3 points
  2. Because we've shot so much with Yodkhunpon it makes sense to put everything there is so far in a single place. This way you can browse through the documentation and if you are a superfan get more and more of this wonderful fighter. Biography The tales of The Elbow Hunter are a series of patron-supported short interviews we have done with Yodkhunpon talking about his life and career. You get to see the gentleness that lies beneath his violent elbow style: Sylvie telling a story of Yodkhunpon he told her: Slow Motion The Muay Thai Library Sessions with Yodkhunpon #9 Yodkhunpon "The Elbow Hunter" pt 1 - Slicing Elbow (37 min) watch it here Simultaneous Raja and Luminee title holder at 118 lbs, Yodkhunpon was one of the most feared elbow fighters in Thailand, and in this session he teaches the looseness and spacing that made his lead elbow such a viscious weapon. He also shuns the traditional rocking chair knee, and instead teaches a powerful stand-in crossing, open-hipped knee that compliments his elbows up top. #15 Yodkhunpon "The Elbow Hunter" part 2 - Escapes (48 min) watch it here Part 2 of my session with one of the most feared elbow fighters of the Golden Age, Yodkhunpon Sitraipom, The Elbow Hunter of 100 Stitches. Lots of fine details in this one, escapes from clinch locks, turns and catches. Best is his floating, gentle style that also holds such violence. #84 Yodkhunpon Special Intensive - The Whole Elbow Style (70 min) watch it here No other fighter in all of Thailand has developed so complete and pressuring a style based on the weapon of elbows. In this session the Elbow Hunter of 100 Stitches presents his whole galloping style, revealing how he opens up windows for his elbows, and uses those windows to then open up attack with other weapons. #104 Yodkhunpon Sittraipum - The Art of Shadowboxing (64 min) watch it here Some have said this is one of the favorite sessions in all the Library. It's very rare to get detailed instruction and advice on How to Shadowboxing, let alone from a great fighter fo the past. This is a FULL hour of how to shadowbox, learn with me as I learn from The Elbow Hunter of 100 Stitches Yodkhunpon, the greatest Elbow Fighter in Thai history. Bonus Session 9: Yodkhupon Sittraipum - Lethal Smoothness (73 min) watch it here In this session Yodkhunpon really delves down into the smoothness of his style, with great emphasis on his galloping footwork towards the end. It's all about building a pressure style that does not strain, but rather exerts a constant music of forward attack. Yodkhunpon on The Art of Shadowboxing #104 Yodkhunpon Sittraipum - The Art of Shadowboxing (64 min) watch it here Some have said this is one of the favorite sessions in all the Library. It's very rare to get detailed instruction and advice on How to Shadowboxing, let alone from a great fighter fo the past. This is a FULL hour of how to shadowbox, learn with me as I learn from The Elbow Hunter of 100 Stitches Yodkhunpon, the greatest Elbow Fighter in Thai history. Yodkhunpon Techniques Knees Footwork Hitting Guard A Free 30 Minute Training Session w/ Commentary - Him Teaching His Style Watch With Me Fights of Yodkhunpon Sylvie and I have done watch with me edits of fights of the Golden Age, these are the fights of Yodkhunpon we covered: His Championship Fights: A Footwork Edit: A Yodkhunpon Fights YouTube Playlist Modern Martial Artist's Breakdown of Yodkhunpon's Style The Muay Thai Library Sessions with Yodkhunpon #9 Yodkhunpon "The Elbow Hunter" pt 1 - Slicing Elbow (37 min) watch it here Simultaneous Raja and Luminee title holder at 118 lbs, Yodkhunpon was one of the most feared elbow fighters in Thailand, and in this session he teaches the looseness and spacing that made his lead elbow such a viscious weapon. He also shuns the traditional rocking chair knee, and instead teaches a powerful stand-in crossing, open-hipped knee that compliments his elbows up top. #15 Yodkhunpon "The Elbow Hunter" part 2 - Escapes (48 min) watch it here Part 2 of my session with one of the most feared elbow fighters of the Golden Age, Yodkhunpon Sitraipom, The Elbow Hunter of 100 Stitches. Lots of fine details in this one, escapes from clinch locks, turns and catches. Best is his floating, gentle style that also holds such violence. #84 Yodkhunpon Special Intensive - The Whole Elbow Style (70 min) watch it here No other fighter in all of Thailand has developed so complete and pressuring a style based on the weapon of elbows. In this session the Elbow Hunter of 100 Stitches presents his whole galloping style, revealing how he opens up windows for his elbows, and uses those windows to then open up attack with other weapons. #104 Yodkhunpon Sittraipum - The Art of Shadowboxing (64 min) watch it here Some have said this is one of the favorite sessions in all the Library. It's very rare to get detailed instruction and advice on How to Shadowboxing, let alone from a great fighter fo the past. This is a FULL hour of how to shadowbox, learn with me as I learn from The Elbow Hunter of 100 Stitches Yodkhunpon, the greatest Elbow Fighter in Thai history. Bonus Session 9: Yodkhupon Sittraipum - Lethal Smoothness (73 min) watch it here In this session Yodkhunpon really delves down into the smoothness of his style, with great emphasis on his galloping footwork towards the end. It's all about building a pressure style that does not strain, but rather exerts a constant music of forward attack. Aside from the Library if you really want to dive deep you can also rent or buy or subscribe to the Sylvie Intensive Series which includes 7 days of learning from Yodkhunpon, over 7 hours. All the earned profits from tht series go to Karuhat and Yodkhunpon: browse that series here If you'd like to help support Yodkhunpon you can also get a shirt we've designed for him showing his bloody elbow wearing his Lumpinee Belt, 100% of the earned profits go to him! get that shirt here
    3 points
  3. Ooooh what an interesting topic, grow through adversity. I've had meniscus tears on both knees, I am almost fully healed and they have helped me get better footwork, stronger kicks and I'm more versatile. Footwork: agility drills are great knee strengthening exercises so I've been doing countless drills (walking backwards also helps) which has also given me lighter and faster feet. Stronger kicks: I've been doing low squat jumps, duck walks, single-leg balance drills to strengthen my knees. This has also given me a lot more kick power. Versatility: To avoid putting too much stress on one knee I've practiced switching stances a lot which has helped me improve my southpaw stance. In sparring, if I feel any discomfort in one knee I simply switch stance. I've healed my knees through my own research and help from trainers, traditional and new knowledge.
    2 points
  4. That's the benefit of discussion. We got what we need to know and also came to know about the things that we've never heard before. Keep posting like this.
    2 points
  5. For me the trickiest part of shadow kicks is that a target actually interrupts the overall trajectory, so not hitting anything kind of makes the balance difficult. If your kicks on pads and the bag are fine, I recommend kicking a few times, then just back up so you "miss" the target and try to throw your kick exactly the same as when you hit the target and see what that looks/feels like. Then you can recreate it and do it a gazillian times.
    2 points
  6. Re electrolytes. As you surely know, you need more electrolytes, especielly K potasium and Mg magnesium, aside of the usual Na sodium. Here in Sweden we have a very interesting product for us ketosians. The so called minerale salt. Where, instead of the usual 99,8 of NaCl, the Na content is just 50%, K is 40%, Mg is 10%, and trace amounts of J... Exactly what the keto doctor prescribed. And Im salting with this freely. Not just some light sprinkling for the taste, but quite heavy. (yes, I have become accustomed to it, and also, to heavily use black pepper...). So, not any scientific measurement of electrolytes, but I think I get enough. Without using other specialized products... Yes, I too get a slight headache, and get somewhat dizzy when Im going into ketose... But I never got the so called Keto flu. Perhaps because Im heavily using this minerale salt? Also, I was living at least one year before on a lowered carbo diet.
    2 points
  7. For me one of the most interesting dimensions of fighter photography is found in all the in-between moments. So much is focus on The Clash. These for me, even when executed beautifully, are boring. I've read some photographers feel that when they are photographing a fight they really want to capture that decisive moment, the clash that tips the scales. These are Sweat Spray moments, often. The gunned shutter that blurs through an action peak, and then is edited out. Hey, these can be cool, very cool, but...when taken as a whole, as a genre, they are numbing, at least to me. I'm really interested in the human feeling within fighting, those fallen moments, those re-gathering moments, when duress strips away the pretense, and the fighter calculates up. These compass headings are spiritual. The above really is on reflection on this "Ripley" photo I took last week of Sylvie between rounds going up against the impossible hill of Yodkhunpon: Which called to mind my photo of Sawsing Sor Sopit between rounds in a fight (you can find that photo here: https://www.muaynoir.com/Prints/i-2Nn5Svg/A ): Why are these photos so satisfying? At least to me. They reach into what really matters in fighting, and therefore of fighter photography. I see so much difference in the humanity of these two legendary fighting women, the ways in which they summon themselves, a great reserve truly more beautiful than a perfectly landed cross or head kick. This is what is spectacular in fighting.
    1 point
  8. They have only 1 model and it's too small... But thanks anyways, I didn't know this brand so I'll check there if I need some equipment in the future.
    1 point
  9. What should be the best ingredient for weight loss process.??
    1 point
  10. Bro You're Explanation is always awesome.. I'm becoming a big fan of you..
    1 point
  11. So if you tend to overeat, next step would be to mind the size of the portions. We tend to eat up what is on the plate. So the easiest is to use smaller plates. And dont take extra portions. Sorry for my uneven english. English is my third language. Even if I do often participate on english spoken forums, but still, its uneven. There are also spices and foods, which increase the burning. Chili is well described, but its probably true for all peppers, because they all contain the same capsaicin?. The big studys had been done with chili, that is why everyone mention chili. But almost all peppers are useful There are surely also other spices. Also, cocoa oil burns nicely, and help with the burning of other fats too. Some use just cocoa oil as their leaning up device... Take coldpressed organic style. Nuts are good. They have much calories, but also they are burning nicely, so the practical net effect is better than the theoretical contains of calories. There are surely also other foods which are both healthy, and hasten up the burning.... Of course, in such studies they gets quite a lot of that preparates / foods. More than a normal person uses. But many small additions, and soon you are there. Just to be consistent. Also, its possible to get used to bigger amounts of say, black pepper, than an average person uses. Just buy a big jar with pepper, so it will be cheaper per kilo. Morning exercise before you eat breakfast. A brisk walk / running at least half an hour. Take coffeine before. You may take a little cocoa fat before you start; it will start up the burning. Wait with the breakfast at least half an hour after the walk, or at least, eat just slow carbos for breakfast. No sugar nor wheat. If you are on keto its of course no problem here, but not all are on keto. This advice is, because increased burning continues a while after the exercise. You dont want to stop this by eating quick carbos.... A brisk evening walk of at least half an hour, is also useful, by the same reason; ie increased burning which continues during the night. But dont take caffeine before the evening walk; you will get difficult to sleep. A 18-6 diet (or some variation thereof) may be useful to try. Ie, you eat between, say 9-15, and nothing during the rest of the time. OMAD one meal a day, is of course an extreme version of this. Or Sylvies pet variation, every second day... Being on keto, isnt even no big deal. because you arent hungry the same way as when still on carbo. I myself use 18-6, flexing by practical reasons into 16-8. This gives me possibility to get two planned meals a day, and even; a little plate of youghurt with lotsa of different healthy spices and ingredients in midways in the day.
    1 point
  12. Hey all! What kind of improvements has anyone found when dealing with their own kind of injury? Personal experience : before my right toe was prone to being injured I used to rely on cardio when being out scored in sparring, I would either throw nonstop but often poorly timed kicks or I would march forward, taking shots until my partner was tired and then score points. My improvement/lesson - Recovering from being sick and right toe being prone to injury while I'm in fight camp. It has taught me to time my switch kicks/right kicks better and manage frustration better.
    1 point
  13. Hey how does one discover their own striking power because my coach says when I’m sparing I’m holding back and I haven’t discovered my striking power but I’m afraid I won’t have control of my striking power if I throw 50% so how does one find there striking power? Or unlock there striking power?
    1 point
  14. I suppose the old time sallade blades, and spinach blades are among the best. Also, spinach blades are neutral in taste, almost a little sweetish, so you can eat them quite a lot, even if you arent fancied in the classical sallad-blade sallades. Most "above the earth" groceries are good. Berries are good too; both for being healthsome (lotsa of vitamines and antioxidants), and not much sugar. Fruits if you arent ketosian. Apples are excellent. Bananas have much potassium. If you are OK with not so matured bananas, they wont contain much sugar but contain much fibres and all the vitamines and minerales typical for bananas... Matured bananas contain much sugar and less fibres, so it cant be recommended for a person minding hers weight - or state of blood sugar. Ps. Im by instinct recommending lotsa of antioxidants. But I have learned, for active full contact fighters whom are always having lotsa of micro-contusions, much antioxidants arent good. Im not sure about the mechanisms,, it seems the oxidating agents indirectly helps with the healing of these micro-contusions.... So, my guess to summarize: if you are a full contact fighter, take antioxidants because they are necessary for good health, but dont take more than an average person.
    1 point
  15. In my experience, strikes are more powerful when they're relaxed and not "trying to be hard." Trying to control power usually tenses up the limbs and makes you both less able to control them and too slow and too light. Loose, relaxed and still fast but controlling the impact. "Letting your strikes go," is almost always a trying less "hard" and being relaxed.
    1 point
  16. I love this approach to fighting photography! Do you think you would be able to compose a series of photos of these in-between moments to tell the story of the fight too?
    1 point
  17. Hey! 3rd time doing a weight cut, so I'm not too experienced but I tried to not overcomplicate things and I have found good results from counting calories and staying in a calorie deficit. (Burn more calories than I consume on a daily basis.) I keep to high protein, high carb and low fat meals. Example : I burn 2300 calories each day without training (with training around 3000-3200 calories) and I eat around 1900-2000 calories! I use MyFitnessPal to track calories!
    1 point
  18. Oooo! This has actually given me some ideas for my own training now! Did you do fighting specific footwork drills or general athletic footwork drills? And the walking backwards thing, did you get this idea from a guy named "KneesOverToesGuy"? Or trainers/own research?
    1 point
  19. An update on this, I'm at day 12 now, and finally feel energetic both mentally and physically! I've been eating a lot and careful with electrolytes. I actually managed to gain weight.. (Looks like the gaining has stopped though). My mental energy came back a few days into keto diet, and I've been feeling sharper and calmer than before keto My physical energy took a bit longer to come back (comparing to my pre-keto level). I did my first keto run 3 days ago, it was the most sluggish run, but after that the energy's been improving quickly every day! Today I had a long run, and it felt great! My period is being delayed, but I guess it can take a while for my body to adjust. I'll be patient
    1 point
  20. I've always admired those with a beautiful strong shadow boxing kicks. The ones that cut through the air with complete focus and balance. The one that comes from the hip and snaps like a whip. I've tried to find a good example, you can see something similar here: I've been trying to improve my own kicks like this but can't get the hip movement right (kick on pad/bag no issue). I was given two pieces of advice, one (very funny) is to twirl like Cinderella to get used to the full twisting movement. One was to kick and then midway in: grab my ankle, pull it towards my thigh/buttock and balance on the ball of my foot while connecting with my hip power. Still, it's just hard to get it right. It's way easier to hit a target than kick through the air. Anyone having some kind of advice? Just a matter of iteration plus repetition? It's a bit of an ego thing of mine to get it right...but of course also, learning to kick through the target than just hit it.
    1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. Im glad my improvisation was useful to you. To summarize. Its of course always nice and beneficial to have superior cardio, be physically superstrong and able, and have a solid belly muscle armor. Both if you do Muay or any other sports, including Karate. But being a Karateke as compared with a Nak Muay, you will train less on these moments, but concentrate instead on the moments mentioned above. Why, you will get quite a some cardio and muscles "just" by doing the usual training, alike katas, explosiveness, reflexes, and so on. As long as you do them honestly, and arent resting and drinking water half of the time. Not least, because a typical Muay competition is full contact fight, while a typical Karate competition is either Kata, or half contact. As I know, full contact is done almost only on films... Kumite ? Unless you are a pro in elite class. If so, you dont spare on anything, are making sure you are topping off everything at once. Doing anything to get an edge over the other pros.
    1 point
  23. Thanks Buddy. That one was helpful.
    1 point
  24. Anyone trained with the Woodenman? His legendary elbow fight was awesome! I know he trained some UFC/MMA fighters. I wanted to learn from a real muay thai fighter and this is the closest one but still a long drive. Is it worth the drive? How much would a private cost? I have a leg injury in my dorsal flex that slightly affects my balance should I still learn muay thai? Thanks.
    1 point
  25. I dont know much about Karate. But I suppose a wanna be karateke would do wise to train flexibility and body control, aside of some overall physical and muscular ability. Also, any exercise you can come upon on training quickness and quick reactions. Endurance is good, explosiveness even more important. I remember, when I saw a group of beginning karateke training, and I noticed their leader; be it the Sensei himself or at any rate; apparently a trained karateke. I remember his total body control. I got deeply impressed....
    1 point
  26. Hey everyone! First time posting! I have managed to develop a bunion on my big toe from rolling over on my big toe, it is quite annoying but I have no plan on stopping training/fighting in Muay Thai, so looking for advice from others that deal with it or know of others that deal with bunions. I have done general research on bunions, so I have ideas on rehab work for it but would love to get advice on it if anyone has to some to offer!
    1 point
  27. If you do have Endometriosis, cutting out dairy, gluten, caffeine and alcohol are all the THIS WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE things they tell you make symptoms worse. I still drink coffee every day but everything else is gone. I don't recall how long it was that my periods were sorting themselves out, but I'd guess it was maybe 4-6 cycles. There was a distinct "what the f*** is this?" for at least 2 or 3, haha. But it's all about your homones rebalancing and regulating themselves, so that's going to take a while. But if you're consistent, they will become consistent. There are lots of podcasts and blogs about keto for women and they all talk about menstruation because that's why women aren't ever included in major scientific studies, there's just so much data due to menstruation. You can just look up menstruation and keto and find a lot of info that may help guide you.
    1 point
  28. Hey Sylvie, thanks for replying and sharing the experience! That's a relief to hear! Do you remember around how long it took to become regular? Wow I haven't heard of Adenomyasis.. I've had serious cramps that'd make me pass out before I started Muay Thai. The doctor suspected it was Endometriosis, but I never had the surgery to be sure of it. Later, a couple months after I started training 5~6 times a week, the pain went away! I have a theory that the blood circulation + slamming the abs with the pads somehow massaged it away.. so I was a bit worried that changing to keto might shake it up unfavourably. It's good to know what other people experienced so I can adjust my expectations Interesting point about dairy too.. must have been difficult to cut it out I will keep it in mind and might experiment with it one day
    1 point
  29. Wow awesome! I found a reduced sodium salt here in New Zealand too, seems to be a similar mix to yours.. going to get some https://mrsrogers.co.nz/product/iodised-low-sodium-salt-mix/ Interesting to know that you get the headache too!..I was wondering if it was to do with my hormones.. how long did it take to go away? did you have headaches when you switch back into keto even after you became fat-adapted?
    1 point
  30. Hi Amy, my period changed a few times throughout the two+ years I've been eating Keto. At first they just got really, really light and shorter. Then they became a bit irregular. Now they are very regular, both in spacing and in the heaviness or lightness of flow based on the days; very predictable. I never had bad cramps at any point in my life, although I've heard people say their PCOS and cramping was greatly improved by Keto. I have Adenomyasis, which is less common but not all together different in symptoms from Endometriosis. I found that my initial reliance on dairy was exacerbating my gut issues and so I had to cut that out. That's been difficult, but worth it in terms of helping alleviate and in most cases completely get rid of most of those symptoms.
    1 point
  31. Thanks for the insights @StefanZ Yeah I had a gut feeling that it's the stress level that negatively affects menstrual cycle the most. So far (only 3 days in), I'm actualy gaining a small amount of weight each day I had a slight headache for the first 1.5 days, but it went away since I started on higher sodium (Thanks to the excellent advice on electrolytes here). I'm feeling surprisingly good in my energy level too
    1 point
  32. Without me being a woman nor expert on Keto (even if I myself am on Keto a year running). So with the risk of doing some mansplaining(?), I shall try to give my answer. Many ketosians use keto not as a way of healthy food status, bringing also harmony in their insulin and stress hormonal levels; but mainly as a way to reduce their weight. And so, to be on the safe side, are ALSO reducing much their calorie intake. And if so done, too few calories, its easy to get disturbances in the menstruation cycle for women. Double so if the keto diet has also disturbed nutrient status, too few vitamines, for example. Others are training too hard. Either because they are into elite sports. Or have a hard physical work, and not enough of good food. A typical example for both, are gymnastics girls. Where super hard training combined with strict low calorie diet are often causing late menstruation or no menstruation. So. As I understand it. IF you want to go down, wait with any radical cutting off of the totale calorie intake. Make sure you get all the nutrients necessary, and even - better them up. Also, make sure you are keeping your stress levels down. Sleep well. Use breathing techniques, etc. Whatever you find useful. When you are well and good in ketosis, feel well with it, everything is in balance, hormon levels as insulin and cortisol and other stress hormones are on low and nicely steady niveous; first then you can perhaps begin to cut down the total calorie intake. Dont worry, as you arent eating no candy nor sweets, no wheat, no etc... Your portions will be anyway automatic much smaller, and probably the calorie intake will ALSO be somewhat lesser; EVEN as you take much more fats than earlier....
    1 point
  33. This is a question for shorter inside fighters or anyone who marches opponents down. My names Mike. I’m new to the forum and I’m an amateur Muay Thai fighter. I’m 5’9” and 150 Southpaw and I find the forward marching style extremely effective for me. However some are highly against switching stance often. There is the obvious danger of sweeps or getting caught in B range. Do you feel the march is less effective because of constant stance switching?
    1 point
  34. Hey StefanZ It first started from a hyperflexion of my big toe, happened during sparring a few times. I put it down to being lazy with my movement. And now possibly a combo of the stress from hyperflexion injury and tight shoes. Now that it is a reality for me, I am more conscious of what shoes I wear and try spend more time barefoot. I use my right leg way less in sparring to avoid the pain, switch kick less, use my right foot less to sweep. It is teaching me to time my switch kicks better. This is now something I will have to deal with in my training/fighting until it physically stops me from doing it. I will look for Diclofenac to help with the inflammation when it happens
    1 point
  35. The question is, if you got this bunion / hallux vagus, from Muay, or from elsewhere. For example, too tight shoes. I havent noticed Muays have more hallux than other persons. Some do have this sticking out bone, but that is common in the overall population. A direct hallux vagus; yeah I have seen this occasionaly on a fighter, but its not common... Thai women seems to almost never have this. My guess is, they dont use high fashion shoes with tigh toe part forcing the toes together...
    1 point
  36. Very Nice thread and also very informative. I always like your post and always look forward to it.
    1 point
  37. You know of course about these different devices to hold back / hold straight the toes in these hallux vagus "bunions"? Cant hurt, may help. For the inflammatory process and pain involved, diklofenac paste as mentioned earlier, should be good. Of course, be double careful to use comfortable, no nonsense shoes or sneakers.
    1 point
  38. You should rest for a while and less your practice..
    1 point
  39. Diclofenac- paste could help some. Its both strong anti-inflammatory and reducing pain. I suppose its possible to get at your place? Ps. I hope its not increasing the risk of bleeding. Salicyl-acid, as in aspirine, is increasing the risk of bleeding.
    1 point
  40. When advancing you can also teep the thighs - underutilized - and the hip. This keep people from setting up on you.
    1 point
  41. Thank you so much . My original styles utilized where mostly backfoot and teep oriented with some muay mat training as well. So I’m very familiar with using my teep as often as my jab. I’m going to watch these, take your advice and get to work! -Mike
    1 point
  42. Hey thread opener, reading your story let's me remind my own - since it was exactly the same. After we had a big fight event at our gym our Kru realised there is money to earn and training groups became bigger and bigger, quality of training was getting worse in order to fit to the average. As a fighter I missed that hard, high quality training, struggles with my coach became more and more intense, he was blaming me to "stop that youtube-learning or go somewhere else" since he's the only boss in here and he is better than everyone of us and we have to follow him. In the end I left the gym since I didn't have a good time there anymore, felt bad after each training, neither doing good to my trainingspartner, nor myself, nor the Kru. Since then I was training with a handful of friends who left the gym for the same reasons and we train ourselves, try to get privates from other coaches and so on. At the beginning it felt strange or weird because such important thing in life is just gone for that moment - but that feeling is vanishing when a new chapter is opened. I was struggling a lot with that question whether to switch to another gym - but I couldn't. He was still my Kru and to me it was not just a fitness club which I'm switching. So I decided to go my own way. How did your situation end up?
    1 point
  43. Just dropping this here: I'm kind of mesmerized by this photo. I knew I had it the moment I hit the shutter. I took several more to be sure, but sometimes the subject and the device just connect. You can see a higher res version of the photo here: https://www.muaynoir.com/Prints/i-z63TzJ3/A What I wanted to think about in this post though was the way that black and white, and that old school luminescence can bring an incredible throwback feeling that feels important with older legends of the sport. Muay Thai is, in the end, in Thailand a performance and capture of masculinity. As Muay Thai changes and bows to the pressures of the the west/global aggro fighting, so does the masculinity being portrayed. This photo just seems to throw me back into another time. Pudpadnoi fought his first fight in 1965. He assumes this aura even at the age of 70. The things we can bring about in our edits have huge aesthetic ramifications, because they help us see things in a different way. The men, the sport.
    1 point
  44. That would also be considered bad form in Thailand, mainly because the hierarchy of a gym is that fighters are not independent agents. A trainer, and more likely than that the owner/manager of the gym would be who gets the invite in Thailand. That said, I don't know what the etiquette of your country is, assuming gyms are composed of paying customers rather than contracted fighters.
    1 point
  45. Hi! Since I gathered a lot of expeirence getting injured and sick while training, I thought I would start a new topic, namely: gym/trainer advice received on how to care for injuries or ailments. I will start with a couple of things I have been told and their origin. Swollen, painful knuckles: massage with hot water and salt (western boxing coach, Sweden) Ligament or muscle issues: Ice bath with salt. Eat potatoes and ocra/lady fingers. (lethwei trainer, Myanmar) Any kind of muscle pain: warm water massage (basically all muay thai trainers, Thailand) Cough: gurgle with warm salt water (muay thai trainer, Thailand) Shin dents: gentle warm water massage downward motion (muay thai trainers, Thailand) Prevent skin rashes of any kind: rinse water directly after training then apply baby powder (muay thai trainer, Thailand) Pink eye: stay away, absolutely no clinching, hot water compress (muay thai trainers, Thailand)
    1 point
  46. Hello, everyone! Welcome to Muay Thai Roundtable. This forum is Sylvie's brainchild, I am here to help moderate. For those of you who aren't familiar with either of us, I want to offer an introduction, so you know who we are, where we come from, what we're trying to do, and all that jazz. The quick, easy to digest version is in the picture below, which breaks it down pretty succinctly. You can scroll down to see a more detailed explanation. Sylvie von Duuglas-Ittu This forum is a part of Sylvie's site and blog, 8limbs.us. She's been running the site for 3 years now, starting at the very beginning of her Muay Thai journey since moving to Thailand and sharing its most intricate details along the way. She's from Colorado, US and first discovered Muay Thai while living in New York after her husband, Kevin, urged her to watch Ong Bak with him. From there, she started training with Master K in 2008. She trained with him in his basement and started filming her private sessions with him as a way to study and track her progress as well as to preserve and share Master K's teaching. There, her Youtube channel was born, which now has more than 2,000 videos! The following year, she went to Thailand for the first time to train, with Kevin in tow. After returning, she went on to train at Chok Sabai gym and also with Kaensak while saving and planning to make her way back. The original plan was to be here for a year if possible, but hoping to stay long enough to have fifty fights, but she's still here, has been for three years now, has had more than one hundred fights and is planning to keep going for as long as she possibly can. Her and Kevin sustain their stay here with a combination of income from Kevin's work, personal savings and a Go Fund Me campaign, by which lots of generous supports donated money to help keep her here after following her journey. This allows her to maintain a full-time training schedule. You can see what a day of her training looks like in the video below: Sylvie spent the first part of her Thailand fight journey in Chiang Mai fighting out of Lanna gym, but now lives in Pattaya, training at two gyms, Petchrungruang and O. Meekun, which are both very Thai. O. Meekun is also the home of PhetJee Jaa, who is quite possibly the greatest female fighter on the planet. To say that Sylvie fights regularly would be a massive understatement. She not only takes fights whenever and wherever she can get them, but is constantly seeking opportunities to fight more, with the best competition she can face. She has already gone up against some of the best women in her weight class in the world, often with a big weight disadvantage. Her huge wealth of experience in fighting along with her insight into Thai culture and social dynamics and her desire to build and share as much as she possibly can makes her invaluable, and I'm grateful that she has created this forum as a way to share more of that. Emma Thomas I'm a 26-year-old Brit, who first dove into the world of Muay Thai at the age of 22 while on a solo backpacking trip through Thailand after graduating from university, having absolutely no previous athletic experience or knowledge of combat sports but a huge passion and desire to get into it, which emerged almost out of nowhere. I was hooked from the start, not only on the sport but on the country, and after a month of full-time training in Chiang Mai, immediately changed my plans, cancelling the last leg of my trip so that I could stay in Thailand long-term and commit to Muay Thai. I then took the steps to be able to work in Thailand as a teacher, getting qualified while training in Chiang Mai before being sent to Bangkok for work. There, I found Master Toddy, the man who turned me into a fighter. I stumbled upon his gym never having heard of him before (which shows how out of touch with the Muay Thai world I was at the time) and planning to leave after two weeks, but have now been living and training at his gym for three and a half years (living in Thailand for over four years in total so far) with no plans to leave as of yet. This is my home now. Meeting him was a huge turning point for me, as he instilled the confidence I needed in myself in order to believe that I could fight. Since then, he's continued to be a wonderful teacher to me and a driving force in my life. I had my first fight after eight weeks of training with him and have now had twenty. Halfway between those two places, I set up my blog, Under the Ropes, which was born as a way to create more Muay Thai content for women as well as to share my experiences. I continue to work as an English teacher, which is something that I really love as well as something that provides a visa and a continued source of income. It means that I constantly have to balance my training and fighting with my work schedule, but it's wonderful. Where our paths cross - Similarities and differences I met Sylvie for the first time via her blog in 2011 and later on, as mine started to grow and we both shared our stories, we noticed similarities. as well as the obvious factor of both being women carving our places out in a male-dominated space, we both have rather introverted personalities and are feminists who are passionate about sharing and creating as much as we can for the benefit of other women. Sylvie and I have rather different lifestyles, and for that reason, our collective stories and experiences here can give a broad view of what it's like here. We also have rather different training experiences, as I train in a very Western-friendly gym which is just generally a very different setting to the one she trains in. We have been able to meet up and train together a few times in the last year and intend to keep doing so. Our difference in schedules means that for the most part, we maintain our friendship and collaborations online (and what better way for a pair of introverts?) Here, we hope to make it possible for others to make similar connections as they continue to share and discover. We thank you all for signing up to the forum and look forward to meeting everyone in it.
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  47. My latest appearance on a podcast, discussing my keto approach and Muay Thai:
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  48. When the word "keto" escapes my lips, the first thing I get is a comment or message about how it's great for weight loss and terrible for athletes. As it happens, I'm an athlete and I haven't lost weight.... and yet it's good for me. Mostly people worry about endurance, hitting a wall, not having energy during training, etc. All of this is exacerbated by the fact that I also fast every other day. Not only is low carb supposed to make you tired, but no food at all should make you unable to move. I've experienced none of this. Not even so much at the beginning, before I was fat-adapted. But I will say this: folks who experience the drag and fatigue - or those who are simply afraid of it - I highly suspect the culprit is not calories or macros at all, but rather electrolytes. If you're struggling to train low carb or fasted - truly, either one - I would urge you to try focusing on your sodium, potassium and magnesium first. All those pre-blended satchets of electrolytes will have glucose in them as well, but I make my own without that and believe it's not needed at all. I'd wager that most of what people experience in being dead-tired when coming to Thailand, feeling depressed, exhausted, etc. is truly more to do with electrolytes than even the physical load. And the physical load is a lot; it's fucking exhausting. But if we're building a pyramid for what's most important, calories and breakdown of food comes a far third to both hydration (meaning electrolytes + adequate water) and sleep. You could eat absolutely nothing and have the electrolyte and sleep thing down and do okay. Even if you don't go low carb or keto, if you're struggling - anywhere in the world, but especially in hot climates where you sweat all day - start with electrolytes, fix your sleep. I heavily suspect people ignore or are ignorant of both these factors and so they focus on food. Did you eat "enough protein?" Are you eating enough or too much rice? Did you eat before training? You didn't eat before training. It goes on and on. On a violin there are pegs that pull the strings from the very end of it, on what's called the "scroll." Those make big changes to tuning the violin. At the opposite end of the string are little metal pegs, attached to the bridge. They make tiny adjustments to the string. Both are needed to tune a violin, but don't mistake them for each other. You can crank and crank at the little metal pegs and make no significant changes. Or you can barely move the bigger pegs on the scroll and have an entirely different sound. Sleep and electrolytes are the big pegs; food, even though it's important, are really those little pegs in comparison.
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  49. I will say, you have actually lost weight, which is kind of incredible because when you were walking around at 48 kg nobody in this world would have thought you could, or even should have lost weight. But a really weird thing happened. You lost about 1.5 to 2 kgs and got stronger. I know you mean that you haven't lost weight in the common sense of "lost weight", but what really happened was a change in body composition. You got leaner somehow, and longer, and stronger. It could be that the body just stopped holding water in the same way, I'm not entirely sure, but it is pronounced even though a few pounds.
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