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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/12/2020 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Here's a little update on my setup I had someone do a mural on the wall for inspiration. The next step is putting in some heavy bags and more gym equipment to make the work out area complete.
  2. 2 points
    Jim

    Pictures

    Check out my new pictures in my training room.
  3. 2 points
    Nice, I'm glad you're back to it that's good to hear that places are still trying to provide services. My Muay Thai gym opened back up but had someone tested positive for COVID so they had to close back down but they are still going hard on the Zoom classes. I unfortunately got sick recently nothing related to COVID but it took me out for a while. I'm also just getting back to training again so I can share your enthusiasm.
  4. 2 points
    Almost all Thai men will ordain at one point in their lives. When a relative dies, when they are of a particular age, etc. This is a temporary ordination, lasting from a single day (for a funeral) to a few years. The longer you ordain, the more you are seen as having good qualities. But you're not looked down on for not staying in the Sangha, just revered if you do. If you are disrobed, obviously there's some stigma to that. But I've never come upon any kind of misgivings or side eyes or gossip about anyone leaving the monkhood after having spent time, even significant time, in it.
  5. 1 point
    There aren't a lot of books or films directly about Muay Thai, the mental game for Muay Thai, the fighter's journey or all that. There are more options for other sports that have either been around for longer (Golf, Tennis, Running), or that have an English-speaking target audience (ultra-running, rock climbing). However, I find some sports very, very inspiring for Muay Thai and what the mental side of it feels like - to me anyway. Here's my running list of books and films: Rock Climbing: Free Solo: Marathon Monks of Mt Hiei: Momentum Generation The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance A Wrestling Life: the Inspiring Stories of Dan Gable
  6. 1 point
    Kem's is a good option because he's also very adroit in boxing, so you wouldn't have to leave your strengths behind in order to get good clinch work in and develop areas you're not yet strong in.
  7. 1 point
    Sylvie von Duuglas-Ittu

    Pictures

    Wow, that's beautiful. Thank you l love your reminders of what you're working on as well.
  8. 1 point
    MadelineGrace

    Fighting?

    Any idea when you’ll be able to fight again Sylvie?
  9. 1 point
    I want to get a Muay Thai tattoo because it changed who I am as a person, my world perspective, yadda, yadda. The thing is, I’m not “legit” enough for a Sak Yant. I haven’t trained in Thailand, am not closely tied to Thai culture outside of Muay Thai, don’t consider myself a Buddhist, and would definitely feel like a bit of a fraud getting one. I *do not* look at other people in a similar position the same way so this isn’t a criticism of anyone in a similar situation who has gotten one. The question is, are there any Muay Thai tattoos that aren’t Sak Yant that are not completely hokey or ridiculous? Or is this just best left alone and the idea scrapped entirely? Is it disrespectful to the tradition of the sport and would only serve to Westernize something not really meant for westerners outside of training? I’m not looking for an answer I want to hear on some of the cultural questions. Seriously seeking some thoughtful considerations.
  10. 1 point
    Hey! When it comes to structure training, over here we have some 15mins of warm-up. After that we either go to 5-6 rounds of pad work, 2 times. One holding pads, partner working out and change after the first set. At the end some 100 or 150 kicks each leg at the heavy bag or pads and some strength. For Pad work just gather your ideas, you can go for any technique or combination you like. On technique days, we just go for partner training, without pads. If you don't remember any techniques to improve, just sort some out online. Every one performing each technique 2 or 3 times, then change, with rounds of ~3min. Hope that could help you a little.
  11. 1 point
    Thanks again. Never heard the visa thing but maybe that is why Okada couldn't go. But that might just be an excuse too. Also it was mean to be in October 1963 then it was changed to December then changed again to January 1964. At least Oyama could still fight in December but when it was changed again to another month after he couldn’t go and that is when Kurosaki was asked to fight instead. I am more a fan now. I did train until 2002 in kickboxing and had so many friend in Kyokushin because here in Netherlands the connection between kyokushin and kickboxing is old and strong. Where do you coach Muay Thai?
  12. 1 point
    Jorge

    Sangtiennoi gym

    Hello, my name is Jorge. I would love to go to Sangtiennoi's gym. It's as authentic as it gets and I can really get to improve my clinching. But I have some concerns. First of all, are there any egos at the gym? I ask because although I can say I don't suck at Muay Thai I am nowhere near the level of young Thai fighters my age, so I am worried that will be a target and I will get made fun of. I don't know, I hear that generally Thais are very friendly, but at least here in Mexico there are a lot of egos in the gyms where guys wanna prove themselves as men or whatever by picking on newbies, I don't know if it works that way in Thailand or not (Fortunately, I am passed that stage in Mexico, but again I am nowhere near Thais my age). Second of all, in your very useful review of the gym (https://8limbsus.com/muay-thai-thailand/sangtiennoi-gym-tough-traditional-muay-thai-legend) you wrote the bathrooms were "very thai style", what do you mean by that? Are they squat bathrooms? Are the showers filthy or doorless? I know if I am going to a authentic countryside gym I am not having exclusive luxury but I still would like to be in a hygienic place with standard-ish bathrooms. I know that as you wrote I can't have a "prince charming" gym, but I am concerned about this two issues and I would be very pleased if you could orient me. Thank you in advance.
  13. 1 point
    Oliver

    Sangtiennoi gym

    Hey dude, It's good, for sure. Wasn't there for long, only 2 months. Basically my main gym closed because of Corona, so Sangtiennoi was the only gym in my research that stayed open and were willing to accept me. Training very very good. Like... Not just good, but it's actually impressive how good it is. And they have a speed bag, which not enough gyms have in my opinion. Owner is a cool dude and so is his son, who also has great Hip Hop playlists for the stereo during training. But here's the thing bro, it's expensive. 30,000 baht a month - but he gave me 5,000 discount after my asking politely. You basically *have to* live in the gym for practical reasons and pay their full package - it's in middle of nowhere, so not practical to rent a room somewhere else and travel in twice a day every day. Unless you have a car or motorbike maybe. So had to leave to save money unfortunately The Thai dudes in Sangtiennois are very very nice, don't worry. Nobody will 'target' you, try to deliberately fuck you up in sparring, or make fun of you. They know we suck compared to them so they are very understanding and patient with our low ability level, they want to help. But...if that does happen, it will be another foreigner that does it to you, not a Thai. But that's not the gyms fault, can happen anywhere.
  14. 1 point
    Midlifecrisisguy

    Attitudes to ex-monks.

    What are general Thai lay peoples views on ex-monks? Is it seen as negative to have been a monk, but then having returned the ordination/vows. According to the Vinaya, it’s fine to return vows, and retake, up to five times in one lifetime, but social attitudes are not always based on scriptural or clerical authority. In Himalayan Buddhist society giving up monasticism is looked down on and can bring collective shame on a family, whilst at the same time Tibetan women see ex-monks as potentially good husbands who are less likely to be drunk and abusive. I’m talking about ex-monks as in those who have taken higher or “real” ordinations, not temple boys.
  15. 1 point
    Sylvie von Duuglas-Ittu

    Sangtiennoi gym

    Hi Jorge, I can't comment on what the people at Sangtiennoi's gym are like, as I've not ever trained there in a regular session and the last time I was there was many years ago. However, Sangtiennoi himself is a wonderful man and I've heard many good things about training at his gym. Hopefully somebody who has spent some time there, or has been there recently, can give a better idea of what the daily experience is like. I did see the fighter's dorms. They have air con, they're small, and if I remember correctly they are flush toilets, not squat toilets.
  16. 1 point
    Hey, this is our thread on potassium and cream of tartar, which is what Sylvie and I use: Ideally, it would be best to target your potassium needs through spinach & avocados, etc, but we baseline a potassium minimum with cream of tartar.
  17. 1 point
    As others have mentioned, sak yant aren't really "for" Muay Thai. In fact they are seldom prominent in most prominent Thai Muay Thai fighters. They are kind of from the under-class of Thailand, much as perhaps tattoos in general were in western countries for a very long time. And, some of that under class become fighters. But...mostly they are just symbolic representations of protection, or power, believed in an an animistic level. A sak yant of a tiger may just be summoning up "tiger energy", the ability to command, stalking forcefulness, etc. It could apply to anything in life. So...sak yant could just tap into or express the underfeelings of what Muay Thai has brought to you, without being some sort of "bro" appropriation. Your own attempt to get in touch with that thing, that meaningfulness. Or, maybe not. In either case, I would say to just get in touch with that thing that Muay Thai has done for you, brought to you, and then find some representation that speaks to that for you. Maybe its nothing that looks like its related to Muay Thai at all...but YOU know it's about Muay Thai. Or, perhaps, if there is a particular heroic fighter who inspires you, then perhaps something related to their image. As for words, Sylvie's discussed a series of Thai words that embody the spirit of Muay Thai, I'm sure she would double check the graphic for you before you got it tattoo'd. This was one: Ning: https://web.facebook.com/sylviemuaythai/photos/a.134623809905091/2636651226368991
  18. 1 point
    Hi SakYants Aren’t just for Muay Thai fighters, lots of people who aren’t fighters have Sak yants. It’s a tradition too that is based on animalism and Magic so it not just Buddhism:) But if Sak Yants don’t resonate how about finding a symbol that represents what Muay Thai means.... Like does training MT bring freedom? Maybe freedom written in Thai? Or something like that. I hope I’ve helped lol
  19. 1 point
    LengLeng

    Sparring with trainer that goes hard

    Thank you very much for your advice and it's also comforting having my emotions validated. With the language barrier and me still navigating the culture, I've opted for an acceptance approach. Like I don't understand it, but I'll accept it. It's tough this shit but would it be easy everybody would be doing it. I think you're right about talking to the trainer, hopefully I can create a bond with him so I understand this better.
  20. 1 point
    This is a situation that I think anyone who tries to really comment on is being disingenuous because they weren't there. My gut reaction is 'that's not acceptable from a teacher' but I wasn't there, I didn't see the situation and I'm sure your own memory of it will probably be slightly different from what happened. The only real advice I can give is to think whether or not you agree with the other coach who said 'he gets like this' and decide whether or not you feel comfortable working with that particular coach. I'm sure even though you're emotional about it right now, that you won't care in a few months. I don't know the culture of Myanmar or Lethwei very well, but I'd suggest talking to the coach and finding it out if you and him are cool - if that is something that's acceptable to do within that culture.
  21. 1 point
    LengLeng

    Sparring with trainer that goes hard

    No it didn't. But if you read your reply to me again you can see you made a lot of assumptions based on my post - without knowing anything about me - which would put me in a position to have to explain and defend myself. I'm a big believer of talking honestly about feelings. I have a blog and Instagram where I write about my vulnerabilities because it helps me grow to face them. And I have many readers thanking me for sharing weaknesses. This is also why I'm such a big fan of Sylvie, she is very very brave in her documentation of her journey. By exposing herself she helped me tremendously. Occasionally, there are people using this to put you down. It's ok, I get it, not everybody understands. But I don't enter into discussions when the intent to help does not appear to be there. Emotions are present in any gym. I've seen so many Thai fighters get angry and tired and upset and I see how the Arjans manage it. Sometimes they just let the boys punch it out on each other, other times they mock them. Martial arts is very much an emotional journey. And I have close relationships with many of my former trainers because of allowing an emotional bond. ...and with my current trainer, we're very close and we get angry at each other all the time. Bickering, laughing, mocking each others or shouting at each other. I'm very grateful for this relationship. In no way am I ashamed of having one deeply emotional reaction to this particular sparring situation. Of course it feels embarrassing. But I'm interested in exploring my reaction as it will help me, not only for my next fight but also in life in general.
  22. 1 point
    Thanks, I'm glad to finally find a good community that shares the same passion for the art of Muay Thai. Yes I will start doing my homework and exploring more of this awesome website and it's content. Also thank you for the suggestion on the home gym your setup is really awesome keep up the good work. Hey Mitchell thanks for the warm welcome I appreciate it and it's awesome to see someone else from L.A practicing Muay Thai. I also made it my goal to start training last year. I actually used to be really overweight and I decided that once I lost a good amount of weight I would give Muay Thai a try. I'm so glad that I decided to try it out because it's been something that has kept me motivated to keep pushing for my overall health. I would love to meet up one day to practice some moves and just bounce back some ideas off you. The gym that I go to is in Midtown (Crenshaw and Adams) so it's really close to my home and it's been a blessing to have them open up in my area. You're always welcome to come check them out when all of this clears up of course. It's been really hard adjusting to a new routine but I've been doin a good job about staying active. My sister also trains Muay Thai so we've been training here at home running drills and doing some HIIT training as well. The online streaming classes have actually been really engaging and in a way it's kind of fun training with the squad from home. Keep up the good work Mitchell and keep pushing and striving to reach your goals. I would love to see everyone sharing their at home workouts.
  23. 1 point
    I hope this might be helpful. I have corresponded with the agent below and he has been (unlike some other agents that provide health insurance in Thailand) very responsive. The provider has a form that needs to be completed re: medical history, and then there are a number of policy options. Some of my friends in CNX have insured through Pacific Cross, and recommend it. I hope this is helpful: --------- Forwarded message --------- From: Jamie Edwards <jamie.e@th.pacificcrosshealth.com> Date: Thu, Mar 19, 2020 at 4:34 AM Subject: Re: Health Insurance Enquiry To: Karuna Foundation <karunasiam@gmail.com> Dear Michael, Currently, the lowest plan to best suit the OA visa requirement is our Standard Extra Plus plan. I have attached the brochure. We fully underwrite every policy allowing our clients to have a direct billing network across 360+ hospitals throughout Thailand allowing cashless treatment, not pay and claim. We have higher plans with better amounts of coverage (all attached). You must have outpatient included in whatever option you choose. If annual premium is a big concern we have ways to reduce the cost by adding what we call a deductible/excesses to the plan. This means you would pay the first amount of the deductible and we pay the rest. We take deductibles for Standard Extra plans and above. We have the no claims potential as well which is 10% the first year, 15% second and 20% third year ongoing. If you would like to apply you would need to complete the application form attached (please make sure every part of the form is filled in and any conditions underlined) and return with a passport copy. Once we receive the application a firm offer will be provided within 3-5 days of receipt. I hope this information is helpful and please let me know if I can be of further assistance or you have any questions. Kind regards, Jamie.
  24. 1 point
    This was a huge fight, though we didn't know it at the time, just an average run-of-the-mill Hua Hin scrap (Sylvie's actually faced several world class fighters in this town). They tried a bit to sandbag Sylvie with a fighter who was about to burst onto the scene in Thailand (obscuring her details, it happens sometimes). Honestly we had never heard of her, but damn such a quality fighter. A couple of months later after a few very prominent wins Pornphan would be ranked #1 by the WBC two (actually it properly should be 3) weight classes above Sylvie. Such a close fight, but Sylvie beating the #1 ranked fighter at Flyweight giving up tons of weight. Maybe 7 kgs here? More on the WBC rankings here. Fight with Sylvie's commentary, then my live commentary.
  25. 1 point
    Chances of training with him are pretty limited, generally. But he'll be at Sylvie's gym Petchrungruang from probably July 2019 til January 2020. I urge pretty much anyone who has a passion for him to make the trip out to Pattaya. It's very rare.
  26. 1 point
    I think of the fights I've been able to find of the golden age guys, he might be my favourite. I love Sagat too.
  27. 1 point
    I reckon he's the best. I watch him and I get the shivers.
  28. 1 point
    Man I love Dieselnoi. There's something about the very awkward way he switch kicks that gives me a smile. I hope I get to train with him, and hopefully not get knee'd one day!
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