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  1. Last night at the Petchyindee show at Rajadamnern Stadium there was a disagreement about the outcome of one of the main events and this happened: https://fb.watch/dHq7PRppGW/ Gamblers stormed the ring and the man waving his arms around trying to get the crowd more riled is known as Hia Dtee (in this case the "hia" part means an uncle, but it's often changed in comments to be spelled like a swear word). He's a major player and is associated with TDet99, which is a group of fighters that are managed separately but train out of Petchyindee. Sia Boat, the head of Petchyindee (the "sia" here also means a ruch uncle in Chinese dialect) has struggled with his fits at his shows many times. Petchyindee just announced they will be adding another show on Monday nights, making them the most frequent promotion around with 3 shows per week (Mon, Thurs, Fri) at 2 dofferent stadia. After last night's erruotion, Rajadamnern announced that Hia Dtee and 2 other gamblers are banned from entering the stadium, at all, indefinitely. Petchyindee's Monday show is at Rangsit, so we'll see if the ban carries over or if it comes dorectly from the stadium. (Hia Dtee in yellow, Pern and Lek flanking) there is a general consensus that gamblers and gambling is out of control with their influence over decisions. Gamblers think referees and judges are corrupt and fighters are lazy. Arguments over decisions are as frequent as there are promotions, every single one has SOME online debate raging for a day or two after. Promoters are tired, fans are always complaining, and Lumpinee banned ALL gambling when they reopened their doors after Covid closures (the stadium is more or less dead as a result of that and a few other factors). Raja banning individual gamblers is a better move than attemtping to ban all gambling, but these are also heavy hitters... the state of Muay Thai in Bangkok is complicated and this is today's hot issue. Yesterday was Mathias's dad being an ass, tomorrow will be whatever happens tonight.
    3 points
  2. I originally went at 22 and my parents were the same. Their only reaction when I told them my plans were "well, we can't stop you from going". They're going to worry no matter what, I don't think anything you could say would stop them. That's what parents do, I guess! Maybe just send them as much information as you can about the gym/area you're going to (posts, photos, reviews from others who've trained there), so they can at least visualize where you'll be instead of conjuring up some wild scenarious in their heads. Enjoy your month in Thailand, you'll have a great time!
    2 points
  3. Informal Intro: I've been reading Agamben's The Highest Poverty, an incredibly dry but also quite fruitful study of Early Christian monastic orders used to gain insight into how cultures - and perhaps more importantly sub-cultures - organize and express themselves. He's examining Wittgenstein's prescriptions regarding rule-following and Forms of Life when thinking about Language and problems of philosophy, but tracing these concepts down to their historical exemplification in monasteries in say the 12th century. It's pointedly obscure, but these details open up into flowers of realization, like seeds, especially as I draw them into the sub-culture of Thailand's Muay Thai, and more properly kaimuay (camp) Muay Thai. I've written along this grain on the Forms of Life, using Bourdieu's concept of habitus in Thailand's kaimuay Muay Thai in "Trans-Freedoms Through Authentic Muay Thai Training in Thailand Understood Through Bourdieu's Habitus, Doxa and Hexis", where the hidden, or at least non-obvious, forms of doing something carry secret formative principles which are expressed in the techniques of fighting. But here, below, I want to bring out a very small thought, that aligns with the concept of rule-following and shaped communal ways of doing. Do not pull your strikes. Sorry for the sprawly introduction. Sometimes I feel like I have to really sketch out where I'm coming from because I sense that my frames of reference are potentially quite alien to the topics I'm putting my thoughts to. In any case, do not pull your strikes when sparring. This is why. Strikes Are Like Words Body of Thought: We've probably spoken about this in our lengthy Muay Thai Bones podcasts, but there are many analogies to the Muay Thai of Thailand and language. You seek a certain fluency and ultimately an expression of a grammar and vocabulary that is not your own. There are many points which map in an illuminating way from one to the other, and I think this analogy sheds light onto areas of learning (and performance) that are lost in more mechanistic views of Thailand's strike armory. In some respects this seems ridiculous. "Of course I should pull my strikes, this is sparring! Do you want an all out war!" But, this is the point. A strike in Thailand's Muay Thai is like a word with syllables. It unfolds in time, like a word. And in pronouncing a word which syllable you place the accent on, the stress, is quite important. BE-gone is a mispronunciation of be-GONE. EN-gin-eer is a mispronunciation of en-gi-NEER. When fighters pull strikes very, very commonly what they are doing is radically altering the pronunciation of the strike...they are softening the final syllable. They are pulling it back. This distorts the entire energy dynamic of how a strike is supposed to follow, which involves the communication of mechanical energy through the body parts into the final syllable, which ultimately comes about through a feeling about that strike, in the very same way you would have a feeling about a word, and how it is supposed to be pronounced. What happens is that you feel that in actual fighting you'll just put the emphasis on the final syllable, after habitually placing it much further up the word. Your strikes will have been trained/pronounced with accents often on the FIRST syllable, coming out fast, and then abruptly slowed down and softened. What will happen is that you very well might SAY your strikes louder, even shouting them in fights, but the actual pronunciation of them will be first syllable. You'll be shouting EN-gin-neer!!! Instead of en-gin-NEER. This is because the flow dynamics of how strikes unfold contain a feeling in time, and of emphasis. And sparring is the closest affective training you can have of actual fight circumstances. Sylvie and I have talked about this in the discussion of the Golden Kick: The Golden Kick – How To Improve Your Thai Kick which compares the shape of the Westernized "round" kick, with the more traditional kick of Thailand's Golden Age. Patterns of acceleration become embedded into the very shape of strikes, just as words become pronounced differently: You can take a deeper dive into these patterns of acceleration if you examine Karuhat's particular chest-rising Golden Kick, which is absolutely unique on it is own, but comprises these final-syllable principles to a great degree: #111 The Karuhat Rosetta Stone 7 - The Secrets of the Matador (83 min) watch it here The idea is that in sparring you say your words softly, but when the emphasis on the end...on the final syllable. They come out relaxed and slowly, and have a bite at the end. This actually folds into very high level striking that you'll find in legendary fighters like Karuhat or Namkabuan, who will begin a strike and as it unfold decide if a different strike is in order, mid-strike...because they are looking with their eyes. Elite fighters have matrix-like perceptions of the time unfolding as a strike a delivered, and I think that some of this comes from the feeling that the emphasis, in terms of feeling, but also bio-mechanically, comes at the end. Ultimately you want the affective shape of a strike, and its reality, to express a confluence of body parts all the way up from the ground, through the torso, into the ends of where the strike makes contact. This is a practiced release of energy. The energy does not have to be "hard". It can be quite soft, just as you can whisper a word with emphasis on the end, almost inaudibly. There is something Sylvie's experienced many times when training with legends of the past. Men in their 60s, even 70s. You can feel how hard they are. Some of this is just their "bones", hardened from so much training and fighting as well, but some of it comes through the dynamics of how power flows through their strikes. Sylvie's commented about this for instance with Sagat or General Tunwakom, both in the Library. Even at very slow motion demonstrations of a technique there is a tremendous, or at least unexpected transfer of energy, at the final syllable. It's not that it hurts, it just has a certain kind of weight. This is because they are pronoucing the "word" properly, even in slow motion. The energy is not stalling, or getting suppressed. It's just that very little energy is being sent through the line in the first place. It still has a zing, because these are the shapes of the words. You do not want to lose the shape of words. Especially the old words. If you've been pulling your strikes, and pronouncing them with emphasis on the first syllables it might very hard to change that pronunciation. It could lead to sparring too hard for a while, or unpredictably. Key would be learning to say your words more softly, with lower energy on the first syllable, and learning to feel how they can accelerate at the end. This would collaborate with what you are or can do on the bag or on pads. You want to feel that ascension in sparring, and the control over just how much electricity you are sending down the line. Another Note about the Shapes of Words and Muay Thai in Thailand This comes to a larger concept about the proper techniques one might learn in Thailand. Just because techniques are being communicated in Thai gyms does not necessarily make them purely "Thai", or connected to lineages that are the most effective. This is because the shapes of techniques are like words, and words are effected by the innumerable practices that make up a gym's social space. A kru very well might be teaching the form of a strike as he learned it as a boy and teen in a kaimuay very different than the one he is in at a kru (the social space, the behaviors of fighters and authorities, etc), but the gym itself is a sponge of Forms of Life, and as we, as Westerners (and others) enter these spaces we are also communicating our Forms of Life. How we through punches on the pads can change the way punches are thrown in the gym, how those words are pronounced. How we come OFF the pads and hold our dispositions, how we recover, might very well change the shape of how Thai fighters recover and express themselves. If definitely seen Western-friendly gyms absorb many unscripted but powerful Forms of Life from the non-Thai fighters they train. It becomes a cross-pollination. This is not necessarily even a dilution. There can be benefits of cross-pollination. But insofar as we come to Thailand to find how words - and even sentences, or full paragraphs - are pronounced in their language, in the language of their efficacy, there are many ways in which we can be communicating and impacting against what we are looking for. We come to Thailand and we find what we already are, because others like us have already been carving rivulets into the rock, changing the habitus. This is one of the reasons behind the Muay Thai Library project. We are filming the techniques and affective expression of Forms of Life one cannot really find any longer, because the kaimuay and the promotional muay that produced them largely no longer exist. It's the way words were pronounced, and a great deal of that is a mixture of technical proficiency, the feeling of a transfer of energy, and end of syllable emphasis that holds it own character, a character of a time and place. When Dieselnoi teaches how to knee, he is teaching a feeling of kneeing, as well as a technical unfolding of parts. These feelings are embedded in a realm of Muay Thai that is no-longer. At best what we can do is reach for these feelings, as we scribe the bio-mechanical guidance of what they are.
    2 points
  4. Following Sylvie's recent post on Facebook, encouraging people to share their experience with Muay Thai gyms in Thailand, here is our experience. This spans from September 2021 to May 2022. September 2021 was when the lock-down slowly eased in Thailand and gyms started reopening – so we had good luck with the timing. We mainly trained in Bangkok and Pattaya. I had been watching Sylvie's videos and reading her and Kevin's articles for a couple of years, so having this information and knowledge was very helpful, knowing where to start and what to expect. While I had been doing western Boxing and some Kickboxing in the past, we only started with Muay Thai in Thailand. We are in our mid-30s & mid-40s, and train as a hobby, once daily, about 3 – 5 days a week. As it turned out, we either were in „group classes“ with few or no other students, or we chose to do private sessions (if not too expensive). So we always had a kind of „individual experience“ and often had laid-back classes, without 5 – 7 mile runs, „300 knees on the bags“ etc. Gyms in Bangkok Jaroonsak Muay Thai Gym – this is where we started our Muay Thai Journey and we continued to come here while we stayed in Bangkok. The gym is located in a neighborhood in western Bangkok, easily reachable by MRT or BTS trains. Training is Monday to Saturday from 5.00pm onwards. We found this family gym to be perfect for us. We got solid tuition and Kru Jaroonsak is a dedicated teacher who ensures a safe and fun experience. Over time, the pad-sessions slowly turned into „light-sparring“ rounds, which we enjoyed tremendously. A lot of locals train here, as well as some regular „farangs“. We recommend this gym highly, for the no-frills, authentic experience. Muay Thai Academy MTA – this gym was fairly close to our apartment, and it's easily reachable from any central area of Bangkok. The trainers and fighters here are all high-level and you can book private sessions here for a very good price. Current fighters include Fani Peloumpi and Mariana Scombatti, both quite well known. We did a few private sessions with a Thai Kru, which we enjoyed. We later trained with Fani Peloumpi who is calm, friendly and has a pleasantly structured approach to training. She taught us new, useful techniques, gave us tips for sparring and adjusted her teaching to our level so that we got a lot out of it. Fani lives and breathes Muay Thai, and is a dedicated, patient and very knowledgeable trainer. We also watched her fight at Lumpini Stadium. Luktupfah Gym – this gym is a bit outside of the center of Bangkok, but – you can rent a room in their gym, which is what we did. We stayed 5 days in total. This is quite a unique gym, because you can also learn Muay Thai Boran & Krabi Krabong here, in addition to the two daily regular Muay Thai sessions. The curriculum is very well structured, and because of the Muay Boran knowledge at this gym, students will be exposed and learn techniques that go beyond „stadium muay thai“ techniques. We only watched the Muay Boran lessons, and we were fascinated by the awesome techniques, wishing we could have stayed longer to also learn them. The gym also certifies Muay Thai teachers, foreign and local. We saw some very famous former Muay Thai fighters come to this gym to get acquainted with the curriculum and get certified as teachers, which will allow them to teach abroad etc. Master Woody, his team and his trainers are caring, professional and the training was excellent. Chatchai Sasakul Boxing Gym – because Western Boxing was my main sport, I was especially keen to visit this gym and had watched Sylvie's videos with Chatchai many times over. The gym is located north of Bangkok, about 35 minutes away from the center, but getting there by taxi is no problem and affordable. The package includes accommodation which is about 3 minutes away from the gym by foot. The gym is also next to a huge food market, so every day after training we would go there for delicious food and juices. The accommodation is great and spacious, and the whole set-up (gym, food, accommodation) made it very easy for us. In the gym, there are several current and former regional Boxing champions as well as world champions, either training for their next fights, or working as trainers. We mainly trained with Kompayak Por Pramuk (former WBA interim flyweight champion and former WBC light flyweight champion). He was great, as was his wife, who helped with training on a few days – she is such an amazing pad-holder – here is a video of them together: https://web.facebook.com/sasakulboxinggym/videos/508005613187338 In the mornings, you can run with the professional fighters and then do a conditioning session. In the afternoons, the focus is on technique and pad-work. It's great to train amongst such high level fighters, and had we been more advanced, I'm sure that we could have sparred with them as well. My private session with Chatchai was very good, and he has a very good eye and throughout our stay, he corrected us whenever he was nearby and saw us do something wrong. Again, this is a very friendly place, that easily integrates visiting students. But it is of course mainly a fighter's gym, that seeks to create world champions in boxing. From my limited understanding, Sasakul gym is also very closely linked with Petchyindee Academy, so during our stay, the Petchyindee/Sasakul fighter „Kumandoi“ (current Rajadamern champion) was preparing for a fight in Japan. So, on top of all the awesome western boxing fighters, we also watched a top Muay Thai fighter prepare and do round after round of sparring with different opponents. Gym in Buriram Yodwicha Gym – as with all gyms, we contacted them via Facebook, which is almost always the best way to get in touch with them. We thought that the gym was in Bangkok, not knowing that just a few weeks earlier they had relocated to Buriram, which is in the east of the country. We communicated with Yodwicha's wife who was very responsive and nice. So we decided to go there, despite the distance. Yodwicha picked us up from the train station and we drove south to the location, which is about 30 minutes away from Buriram city. It is very, very remote. But – we loved it. We had escaped the noise and pollution of Bangkok and lived among farmers, with not a care in the world. They had a lady who cooked for us daily (vegetarian even!), and this was by far the best, tastiest and healthiest food we have had in Thailand. On the weekend we also visited a famous Khmer temple together, which was a lot of fun. The training! Two sessions per day. Yodwicha focused on the basics with us. Balance, good basic strikes and good conditioning is what makes a successful fighter, and this is what he wanted us to understand and emulate. Before us, a young and more advanced, amateur fighter from Sweden had been at the gym, preparing to go professional. We believe that with Yodwicha's tuition, those looking to fight and get to the next level in their Muay Thai will get fantastic training! Yodwicha's wife is also very well connected, so if students want to fight, I think that they would be able to help with that. The accommodation is comfortable but basic, so don't expect any luxury here. We initially wanted to stay for a week, but did extend our stay. For us it was more than just a training camp, but a totally new experience of life in rural Thailand, with very hospitable and warm hosts. Gyms in Pattaya (there really are a lot of great gyms here, so a) we could not visit all of them and b) we had to limit ourselves to just a few of those that we visited. In addition, there are big gyms like Fairtex and Venum Training Camp, but these did not attract us at all. If you are into BJJ, I believe that „Sudsakorn Muay Thai Gym“ has twice daily BJJ sessions with a very good teacher) Petchrungruang - Sylvie helped us set up private sessions with Yodkhunpon Sittraiphum, the „Elbow Hunter“, which took place at this gym. We often trained in the mornings, during which the regular classes took place - these also looked very good, with great pad-work, clinching and a relaxed but serious atmosphere. Training with Yodkhunpon is really unique. He is very friendly, and a dedicated teacher. He will explain and practise a technique as many times as it takes until we finally „click“. To our delight, not once has he held pads for us, but instead everything is practised in a sparring sort-of-way. I really like this because it makes me stay focused and sharp. He will not mollycoddle us, and go „hard, but not too hard“, also with my wife, who appreciates this. Of course, this is not full-on sparring, and he takes very good care not to over-challenge his students. But, this type of training, is as close to „real fighting“ as possible, which we find awesome. We also do a lot of clinching, which does not come naturally to us, but Yodkhunpon is always patient and will find many different ways to teach us, until we finally „get it“. He never "watches the clock" and makes every session memorable. Rusich Club Pattaya – Sylvie did a „tour of the gym“ video, otherwise we would not have known of this gym. We have been a number of times now and we like it a lot. On the one hand, there are „self defence / jiu jitsu“ classes for children and adults, as well as Muay Thai & Boxing training by Yodsanan Sidyodthong and his trainers. We visited mostly to the morning classes, and trained with the two excellent Muay Thai teachers, Kru Manop and Kru Den. Kru Manop is a „teep specialist“ whose many different teep variations will stop and frustrate any incoming opponent. We mainly trained with Kru Den whom we can recommend to anyone, young or old, beginner or pro fighter. He is probably in his early 30s, has had about 250 fights, and even one MMA fight in Russia. He moves as light-footed as if he were on springs, and can evade shots like „Lerdsila“. But, unlike some very highly skilled young(er) trainers, he is not a show-off, nor „uninterested“ - instead he will enthusiastically share all his techniques with students. He is extremely well rounded, and although he says he barely ever clinches in his fights, he showed us many great techniques, trips, sweeps etc. My wife noticed that some Thai trainers can be a bit uncomfortable with/unwilling to clinch and/or spar with female students – this is not the case with Kru Den who has no problem with this. He is a very dedicated and encouraging teacher, who will go above and beyond "what is expected". The gym is brand new, has lots of indoor space (and a huge ring), as well as an outside ring. The price for training is also very competitive. Other notable mentions Baan Rambaa – very good, training. Rambaa is super nice, funny, a great character. He takes good care of his customers and his co-trainer, Kru Beer(?) is also very good. The gym has a great atmosphere, and the children who train there also also very sweet and funny to watch. We were not the only foreigner who trained there. Definitely worth going there! Eagle Gym Pattaya – another gym we would not have known about, without Sylvie's videos (thanks again!). We find that Western Boxing is less taxing on the body than Muay Thai, and unless you do sparring, you also get fewer bruises etc. Plus, boxing is fun. And this gym is great. „Den“ is a former 2 times WBC champion. still in perfect shape. Everyone is very welcoming, the padwork at this gym is awesome and great fun. His co-trainer Sam (Samson?) is also great, he is very motivating and will adapt to your level. His padwork is demanding, fun and always fresh. We always look forward to going to this gym for a class. You can also train Muay Thai there, everyone is catered for. „Yoga Pattaya“ (near Jomtien Beach) - no Muay Thai here. We wanted to include this Studio and especially the „stretching classes“, which offer a different kind of workout, which may help the Muay Thai training and general fitness. Although not heavy on the cardio, these are quite demanding classes - you sweat and ache quite a bit in these classes. The instructor „Sofiya“ takes good care to prevent injuries, and is therefore quite strict, but in an amusing way.
    2 points
  5. Sylvie's sponsor, Onyx MMA is in Singapore. https://www.onyxmma.com/
    2 points
  6. Just adding Samson sessions 3 and 4 https://www.patreon.com/posts/116-samson-isaan-61012013 https://www.patreon.com/posts/123-samson-isaan-68082628
    1 point
  7. I was kind of like you. I trained for 4 years before I had my first kickboxing fight. No knees, just leg kicks and boxing. I never pulled out of something I decided to do but I was very fearful of competing. All the people, the lack of self confidence and the freedom of not having to worry about committment. I loved training but Prepping for a fight? whole different thing. By nature, fighting is a self absorbed sport. You have to ask yourself, do I really want to do this? or do I want to get to a place where I DO want to do this and be like the other guys who seem on a different wave length and level. Am I afraid of it all? Till your answer is YES, I want to fight more than anything else you shouldn't worry about it. The more you train and spar, the more confidence you will ahve. Age is going to catch up to you. IMO you either want it or you just enjoy training. Some people know from the beginning they want it and others just enjoy training. There is ZERO shame in accepting which person you are because we all have situations in our life that affect our desire to fight. Family, work, etc. If it's fear, I used to tell my fighters, You need to accept fear of losing from the start of your preparation and allow yourself to concentrate on the feeling of fear, the embarassment including what others would think of you etc. what would happen in your mind and if you would continue. Absorb these possibilities in your truest feelings, then bury them and train like hell with the attitude that you do not fear the outcome and really love the training and the fight is the reward. Winning is the bonus.The test. You can't get over the fear of something till you do it. You will find the more you do something, the less you fear it. I got to the point in the ring where I did not fear the result, only performing under my ability. One of my fighters fought Anderson Silva for the Cage Rage world title. Curtis Stout. it's on youtube. One of the fights we had in cage rage, he told me, now I know what it's like to fear winning. There is also a fear of winning because then expectations come, especially if you do very well. You need to decide if you want it and deal with all the possibilities, then bury them. If you just want to train, do that. Some of the best pad holders are never fighters. Some of the best fighters are horrible teachers. It's gifted to be a great fighter and teacher. I hope that helps.
    1 point
  8. So here is an informal list of gyms I'd generally recommend, and a short synopsis why. These are maybe one-month-stay recommendations. These are not reviews, just quick overall impressions. Keep in mind, I don't really spend a lot of time in gyms during regular training hours, and I'm not drawn to mega-gyms with lots of trainers, students and new facilities. I just get asked this question a lot so this is my best answer on my experiences, and sometimes from feedback I've heard from people I've sent there. If you have a question you can post it on this thread, or create a new thread in this Topic. I've included links to filmed sessions with some of the krus that head these gyms, I'd strongly recommend watching them to get a sense of the gym and the teaching style. [updated March, 2022] Sit Kru Thailand (Chiang Mai - contact here) Thailand Pinsinchai is a late- Golden Age fighter, so well rounded in beautiful technique, powerful striking, and a great teacher. He was originally part of the Santai krus, so he has experience with western fighters, but has opened his own gym in Chiang Mai. Importantly, he trains his own son as a fighter, and a handful of young (teenage) fighters who are frequently on Channel 7 and Petchyindee shows. The reason this is important is that gyms can have a sweet spot they hit when a Thai team is being built, which makes them very full of focus. Kru Thailand streams training often, you can find video of it here. The gym is on the premises of a resort, so you have a room right there if you wish. The facilities are nice but not fancy, but mainly Thailand is just an excellent teacher and a funny and sincere man. You can see how great Kru Thailand is as a teacher in my hour long Muay Thai Library sessions with him. Session 1 all about technique, Session 2 on clinch Yodwicha Muay Thai Gym (Buriram - contact here) Yodwicha is kind of the last of the great Muay Khao, at least in the true sense. Since he doesn't fight in Thailand anymore, his style is more of an "international" hands and forward-fighting, but he never forgets his roots. You'll be training with one of the best fighters in the world. He's a very generous and patient teacher and his wife Yanisara is a wonderful woman who speaks quite good English which is always a bonus. The gym has moved to Buriram from its former location in Bangkok. I have not visited or seen this new location but have heard from a recent couple who trained with him there that the experience was great. Another perk is that Yodwicha is still an elite fighter, so you can be there while he's preparing for fights and see what that looks like, as well as help him if you're of a suitable size. You can see Yodwicha's teaching style in this great Muay Thai Library session in his gym. Or. Kham/Fight House Thailand - Singburi with Kru Diesel (Singburi - connect to them here) Famed Kru Diesel is the big draw of this gym, but there are a number of very good fighters training there too. Kru Diesel is best known for having brought up two Muay Khao superstars at F. A. Group (Petchboonchu and Yothin) but he has moved to be the head trainer up in Singburi, where at the time of this writing he's rebuilding Sirichai (formerly Tanadet Tor. Pran49 - see this quick interview here), a handful of young male fighters. Female superstar Sawsing also trains there and brings female fighter teammates like Dangkongfah, Fahseetong, Petsaifaa, et al. Kru Diesel is a mastermind for the Muay Khao style, an amazing padman and a truly great teacher. For Muay Khao, this is a top option. The gym currently has nearby apartment options, but they tell me to build fighter dorms early 2022. Importantly, this is a legendary kru involved in building a legit Thai fight team, who also has lots of experience of training western fighters as well. These kinds of sweet spot gyms that are authentically Thai, but also understand western needs are rare. This session was filmed at FA Group, but you'll get a strong sense of Kru Diesel's teaching: Kru Diesel F.A. Group - The Art of Knees (84 min). A new session is coming to the Library that I've filmed at Fight House in Singburi. Follow Kru Dieselnoi Facebook, he live streams a lot. This gym is not easy to find, but here is the Google Map link to it. Manop's Gym (Chiang Mai) - For those that want a gym that is a bit more personal in their training Manop's gym in Chiang Mai is definitely something to check out. Manop is famously known as Saenchai's Yokkao trainer, and he's left Yokkao now to start his own life in Chiang Mai. He is incredibly perceptive as a teacher, very, very technical. I'm not sure I've run into a more precise and intuitive teacher of technique, a man with a gentle spirit as well. He also works really well with young western fighters. The gym is in a quiet neighborhood outside of the city, and seems like a great opportunity learn and train hard. If you check the threads of this forum you will find some very positive, thorough reviews of the gym a solid year or more into its foundation. Also it would seem very women-friendly, as Kru Manop raised his daughter Faa to become a fighter. You can see Kru Manop's teaching style in my Library sessions with him: The Art of the Teep (90 min), Session 2 - The Art of the Sweep (57 min) We did this quick video edit of the gym in 2020 if you want to take a look Gyms I Haven't Been To in While But Probably Still Recommended Kem Muaythai Gym - clinch heavy, gorgeous mountain location, run by a great fighter in Kem, access to Isaan festival cards. Kem's Muay Thai gym may be one of the best in Thailand, high up on a mountain near Khorat. I call it the Shaolin Experience. Big beautiful resort like grounds, grueling training sessions, at times lots of active fighters. The connection to Isaan fighting is very special, there is nothing quite like festival fighting. It's one of the best experiences you'll have as a fighter. I wrote about the gym a few years ago here: Kem Muaythai Gym: Hardcore, Beautiful, Clinch Gym - You can see Kem's teaching style in the Muay Thai Library: Session 1: Building a System (52 min), Session 2: Mastering Everything In Between (80 min) Hongthong Gym (Chiang Mai - contact here) - My private with Joe Hongthong was absolutely wonderful. He thinks creatively about the fighter I am, and then about how to enhance that. They've had successful women fighting out of their gym, and from personal experience I'd say that if you are a Muay Khao fighter Joe would make a wonderful teacher. The gym is very connected to the local Chiang Mai fight scene, and to Bangkok fight opportunities and is very fighter-oriented. mid-sized western fighters seem like they've had success training and fighting out of this gym. Watch Joe's training style: Developing the Muay Khao Style | 87 Minutes - Joe Hongthong - Chiang Mai Please post all gym recommendation questions you have for me here on this thread, or start your own thread. That way the conversation can develop and benefit others too! (This list and its descriptions will be revised over time)
    1 point
  9. I’m going to Thailand for a month to train and parents are shitting them selves. Says im too young and it’s dangerous. Anyone know how to stop them worrying?
    1 point
  10. You're from Glasgow. Tell your parents you're far more likely to get into trouble on a Saturday night out in Glasgow than you are in Thailand. Thailand's a safe country to travel, I've never felt threatened anywhere there all the times I've been. The rare occasions I have witnessed or heard about any trouble, it was almost always a westerner acting like an absolute dick head that caused it. As long as you're respectful and friendly to people, you'll be fine.
    1 point
  11. Sadly Attachai is no longer in BKK. According to @emma's facebook post they are setting up a new gym in Ayutthaya https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=611345137083522&set=a.289400305944675 Their facebook page is still up. Last post was in March so not sure how active it is. https://www.facebook.com/ATTACHAIMUAYTHAIGYM
    1 point
  12. I'm sure Sylvie or Kevin can get you a more accurate location, but on Yodwicha's face book page he commented in Thai that the gym is in Prakhonchai District, Buriram. It's the second comment down. https://www.facebook.com/109758933730799/photos/a.112176056822420/985065366200147/ I plugged that into google maps from the BKK airport and the drive time was approx 5 hours. https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Suvarnabhumi+Airport+(BKK),+999+หมู่+1+Nong+Prue,+Bang+Phli+District,+Samut+Prakan,+Thailand/Prakhon+Chai+District,+Buri+Ram,+Thailand/@14.2482669,101.2749239,9z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m14!4m13!1m5!1m1!1s0x311d67771542274f:0x120d19554f157a07!2m2!1d100.7501124!2d13.6899991!1m5!1m1!1s0x311a20decca5dbc9:0x30469cfc8de5c40!2m2!1d103.035694!2d14.6161754!3e0
    1 point
  13. Kem's is on Sylvie's recommended gym list. Here's her description. Hopefully if anyone has been there recently they will chime in.
    1 point
  14. That's one of the best gym!!
    1 point
  15. Hi! Since I gathered a lot of expeirence getting injured and sick while training, I thought I would start a new topic, namely: gym/trainer advice received on how to care for injuries or ailments. I will start with a couple of things I have been told and their origin. Swollen, painful knuckles: massage with hot water and salt (western boxing coach, Sweden) Ligament or muscle issues: Ice bath with salt. Eat potatoes and ocra/lady fingers. (lethwei trainer, Myanmar) Any kind of muscle pain: warm water massage (basically all muay thai trainers, Thailand) Cough: gurgle with warm salt water (muay thai trainer, Thailand) Shin dents: gentle warm water massage downward motion (muay thai trainers, Thailand) Prevent skin rashes of any kind: rinse water directly after training then apply baby powder (muay thai trainer, Thailand) Pink eye: stay away, absolutely no clinching, hot water compress (muay thai trainers, Thailand)
    1 point
  16. This is an old link. Kru Thailand used to be at Santai, but he left to open up his own gym a couple of years ago now. I think also the Santai head trainer Kru Apple did as well.
    1 point
  17. You can find the gym's FB page here: https://web.facebook.com/Sit-Thailand-Muay-Thai-Gym-106840670828643 You can get a feel for it from the photos and videos posted. Also Sylvie has filmed with Kru Thailand 2x for the Muay Thai Library if you want to get a feeling for his teaching style: #83 Thailand Pinsinchai 2 - The Beauty of Clinch (57 min) watch it here In Kru Thailand's first session in the Library he taught all the principles of his femeu style, in this session, his second in the Library, he breaks down all the things necessary for his dominant clinch attack. Spend an hour learning the techniques that make clinch turns and damaging knees possible. All of it is balance and rhythm at close range. #16 Thailand Pinsinchai 1 - Attacking Shell (62 min) watch it here Former Lumpinee and Rajadamnern champion Thailand Pinsinchai teaches the beautiful framework for his attacking, elbowing style. Lots of minute corrections, small vital details that turn working techniques into dominance. You get the entire picture of a Muay Buek fighter out of the legendary Pinsinchai gym .
    1 point
  18. Hi! Is supposed to be https://muay-thai-santai.com/thailand-pinsinchai/ Best regards
    1 point
  19. Kru Thailand Pinsinchai is pretty old school. A top fighter in his day, technically strong. Has his own gym in Chiang Mai.
    1 point
  20. You may find these sessions in the Library helpful: Session with Rambaa with his take on Karuhat's stance-switching Switching to southpaw with Karuhat
    1 point
  21. Question for Sylvie! When you made the transition to Southpaw….I’m assuming all of your orthodox combos and strikes had a natural flow to them because that was first for you. ..Im wondering how long it took to get a that natural flow in your Southpaw stance? Also, if you have any tips on the transition other constant practice in southpaw. Either way thank you for reading this. Have an amazing day! - Mike C.
    1 point
  22. Thank you Jessy! I’ve booked everything, I’ll be there in September and I’ve texted with HONGTHONG, I think that’s the choice. I’m so sorry for your experience, hope you’ll ho back there and have what you were searching for
    1 point
  23. Hi Priscilla, I know it's a while back but this is my experience : In January 2020, I went to Chiang Mai to train for two months. Sadly, COVID arrived and forced me to come home 1 week sooner. When I arrived in Chiang Mai, I visited both gyms. I arrived at Hong Thong between sessions, I guess, because it was completely empty. I didn't train there so I can't give any advice. I ended up training at Santai. It was a particularly busy time and they had 8-10 coaches. Some of them were still fighters so they would purposfully pick women to train and just do the basics. There was 1 coach who refused to train women altogether because 'Not strong enough'. instead of mentionning that to the person in charge of pairing, he would just swap with another coach and make the women feel like crap. 1 coach was completely jaded and didn't even look at us when holding the pads. There were 4 coaches I liked because they actually cared in teaching you something. Poye and Sak were my favourite. Sak mainly trained fighters. I know quite a few have left over the last two years but I don't know what the situation is right now. Not being a fighter yet, I often felt I was put in the 'women tourists not worth training' category. My experience there was bittersweet, especially that I went to Thailand only to train. Also, this might not be an issue at all but information worth knowing 1. Being beside a temple, women are not allowed to train in a sports tops. 2. The morning sessions were at 6am. As for the accomodations, they varied depending on the building. One has a nice pool. The mattresses in the rooms were hard and plastic-covered, but I think that's common. Many washing machines available. Quite a few restaurants within walking distance.
    1 point
  24. Hi there! I've just finished my first session at Hongthong this evening so I might not be the most qualified person to comment as I haven't trained at Santai but from my perspective things were really lovely at Hongthong. I had some technical correction from my pad holder but not to the point where it seemed like I had been doing things wrong forever. In terms of fighting I've gone there expressly for the purpose of fighting and they seemed really happy and willing to let people fight (someone actually agreed to a fight at the time I was there so its not like it is a 'behind closed doors' deal). Unfortunately, I can't comment from the perspective of being a female fighter in a gym but that being said it seemed like the women who trained with us today were included. I don't feel like they were as actively included as men were. I had to offer to spar with one of the women because she was left without a partner but I'm not sure if that is just a one-off or a long-term thing. I do know that women do fight out of that gym successfully so I imagine you would have opportunities to get rounds in and all that. But, from my perspective as someone who is openly, though not too openly, queer I felt comfortable. People were respectful and didn't seem to be creepy towards the women at the gym though I don't speak Thai and can't comment on whether anything was happening that I didn't understand. From a community standpoint they were lovely I was introduced to everyone, and they made an effort to remember my name. I got good treatment and jumped right into the group really, I've even been invited to a gym drinks on the weekend. So in terms of 'community' it seemed really nice but I can't say whether that will be universal as I'm able to pass as a cis-het man. All in all, after only one day of training I plan to go back, unfortunately I'm not staying at the gym but the facilities didn't seem to bad. I think they were only built in the last 5 years or so. Sorry that I don't have all the info you need but I hope this helps! :)
    1 point
  25. Hmmm. I guess this depends on how old your son is [edit in: sorry, I missed that he was 14], and more about your own tolerance, or enjoyment of change is. Me? I like to settle down in a place. It is only after 3 days or more that I feel ok. When I know where I'm eating, the way to the gym, etc. Then maybe at 7-10 days do I really feel like I'm in something. It also depends on how heavily or often you want to train. Every day? Twice a day? Or taking days off? Just giving you my own sense, I'd say two weeks minimum for a single gym experience, once you know you like it, which means once you start moving again the next stay will feel shortened. When we first came to Thailand we committed in advance to two experiences over I think 6 weeks. I really loved our stay in Chiang Mai at Lanna at the time. Then, perfectly happy, we went down to Bangkok and Sasiprapa. The Bangkok experience wasn't bad in anyway, but we actually wished we had just stayed in Chiang Mai. It was far less gritty, the gym experience was really nice. It wasn't the worst thing to push for two, but it wasn't ideal. I would maybe make a first choice of location, and then a list of 3 gyms in that location. I'd go to each of them for a day and just feel what it is like and go by intuition. Can I picture myself here for 2 weeks? If you find a great one, one you really vibe on, then just stop there, no need to push for more. I'd give myself 10 days in that first choice gym. After about 7 of those days I'd reassessed. Do I want to change gyms? Or do I want to change cities? If you are really happy where you are, just stay. It's pretty easy, and not that expensive to just hop on a plane and be somewhere else if you suddenly get the urge to have a different experience. Don't pay for lots of days in advance, especially in the time of COVID when tourism is going to be down. Everyone will be glad to have you. Keep things flexible.
    1 point
  26. Ruup is literally the body as an object. Picture a doll, how it's posed, how it's positioned, posture, overall composure. It's physical. Ning is something that can be expressed through posture, but it's not the posture itself. It's being unmoved, unbothered, unaffected. If you get kneed in the guts and your body folds, your Ruup broke, but if you just carry on as if it doesn't matter and you keep coming, that's Ning.
    1 point
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