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  1. General - Roundtable | men and women

    1. Our Announcements - Forum Updates and Info

      Get to know the Roundtable. Read the latest forum updates and what we are thinking about. Help design the community.

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    2. Technique, Training and Fighting Questions

      Sharing experiences and knowledge about training and fighting in Muay Thai, as well as technical questions and answers. Mental training is also a part of this.

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    3. 1+1 Keto And Muay Thai Athlete Nutrition

      I follow a 1+1 Keto approach which is a version of the ketogenic diet - low, low carb, high fats, moderate protein - plus fasting every other day. It's not for everyone. Discuss this and all other dietary nutrition topics as related to training and fighting. Questions and shared experiences.

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    4. Gym Advice and Experiences

      Sylvie gets a lot of questions about gyms in Thailand. We only have our own experiences to go on, but the community can help inform others too. Thoughts on gyms can go here.

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    5. Thailand Culture Experiences & POVs

      If you'd like to open a discussion on your experiences, or if you have questions about Muay Thai culture in Thailand or Thai Culture in general, here is the place to post.

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    6. Open Topics - men and women - General

      This is a catch all for posts of any topic related to the fighting arts, Thailand, gendered experiences, etc. that don't fit into the other categories. When in doubt, just post here.

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    7. Patreon Muay Thai Library Conversations

      Here you can discuss anything related to the Patreon Muay Thai Library - Preserve The Legacy project. Session reviews, questions on particular sessions, opening links of discussion, suggestions for sessions to be filmed and just things that you've learned and loved.

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    8. The Fights of Sylvie von Duuglas-Ittu with Commentary

      All my fights are live streamed on my Facebook Page but Kevin also films with a much better camera to which I add commentary. Here where you can keep up on my impossible goal of fighting a World Record 471 documented professional fights, thought to be an 'untouchable' record. My complete fight record is here.

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    9. Kevin's Corner - Muay Thai, Philosophy & Ethics

      A corner of the Roundtable where Kevin (Sylvie's husband) can assemble his wide-ranging thoughts on Muay Thai, history, ethics and Philosophy and invite discussion.

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    10. Discussing What Makes Great Muay Thai Photography

      A subforum where Muay Thai photographers and interested others can discuss this photography genre, and can post their best photos - and even if they like upload higher resolution versions so others can appreciate all the details IG and Facebook lose. Feel free to add links to your streams, photo specs and commentary, or share photography that you admire.

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  2. Women's Roundtable | women only

    1. Request Access To Women's Roundtable   (554 visits to this link)

      This is a dedicated roundtable for women. If you'd like access, please message the Admin by clicking this link.

    2. Women's Roundtable Gathering

      Here is where we post about where Women's Roundtable is headed. Participate in the discussion.

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    3. Female Athletes and the Body

      Female athletes must deal with many things from a bodily standpoint. If you have a question, or there is something you'd like to share only among women, here is the place.

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    4. Female Gym Experiences - Thailand & Worldwide

      Here is where you can talk about your experiences in gyms as women, including longer term issues of gender and sexuality, but also anything gym related you'd like to discuss with women only. If you'd like to post a female-oriented gym review here is the place.

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    5. Thailand Culture Experiences - for women

      If you have a topic or question about Thailand other than what happens in Thai gyms, this is the place. Culture, customs, how tos, being a woman in a foreign country.

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    6. Open Topics - for women

      Here is where all other by women for women questions and topics go. When in doubt you can always post here. The Women Only section isn't just for Muay Thai, it's for all women who train, or even would like to train in the fighting arts.

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  • Most Recent Topics

  • Newest Technique Comments

    • Think we've all seen variations of this issue play out, it's not an uncommon concern at all. On western Thai gyms, it's not usually my instinct to defend or sympathise with them, given some batshit crazy practices that unfolded before my eyes. Like one time in the early days, a trainer got pissed during training and screamed at a dude, then made him go down the street and buy him a hamburger. And he did. After meeting an American gym owner who was travelling, he explained something after being asked about his job. He said, 'Everybody's got a question'. That all day long, every day, every single person who talks to him does so because they want something. They dissect everything he says, wanna know why this, why that, well what about this situation, what about that, how about this other technique, etc. Nobody asks him how his kids are doing, or if he saw his basketball team play the other night etc. We can easily forget that for us, the gym is a place we go after work, but for him it is his work. When we're at work, we don't talk like that to our boss (most of us). If you've ever done a day job that you ended up getting real good at, especially something involving craft of some kind, it tends to happen because you follow orders.  Might be a silly, extreme example to use, and you could justifiably think, 'Yeah but it's not my place of work, he's not paying my salary, in fact I'm paying a lot just to be there'. Well yeah, but on the ground, it never plays out as a customer service type relationship, it's just way too personal a business for that. Plus, that monthly membership fee isn't what actually pays his bills, nor is it the people who fight for his gym. So we can misconstrue our relationship with the trainer, usually as either too close or too distant. A more accurate way of reading that vibe is somewhere between being an employee and a guest in his house, even if the facts don't support that.  Then again, any toxic shit happens, or if he turns out to be a plan charlatan teaching nonsense, of course do the right thing and leave - don't listen to me. 
    • I'm having similar issues. Twice a teep got caught and pulled causing meniscae tears. Not my opponents fault, my knees were stressed already due to lack of knee strengthening exercises. I highly recommend focus on VMO muscle strength like wall sits and agility training. And walking and doing drills backwards. Knees over toes-guy on instagram is excellent for knee rehab philosophy.  Since then my teeps are somewhat hesitant, I sometimes aim too low and slow as my body remembers how I got injured.  I'm working on aiming high, or aiming for the thigh. And keeping distance while teeping. Having an opponent or trainer taking off his or her shirt helps too to see the body. If it's possible.  Sylvie posted a video recently where Karuhat explained how teeps are actually also a movement used for attacks rather than only used for defence (I think it was on her Facebook page). This helped me mentally, as with forward striking movements I focus more on striking fast and quickly pull back so my leg stays up throughout the movement. Not sure it makes sense. 
    • Yes exactly this is what I was taught. Brilliant movement when you stuck in clinch and can't knee. Thanks for looking up and sharing. God it hurts! Also been taught the inside thigh kick followed by head kick a lot (front leg hits opponent inside front leg and with same front leg you follow up with head kick as opponent naturally buckles a bit.  Actually had a conditoning drill today where my trainer kicks my inside thighs thirty times as in the video followed by thirty outside thigh kicks. 
  • Newest Open Topic Posts

    • A little aside note re punching / boxing moments in Muay.  Im thinking on the match between Calista and Pheetjeeja  a couple of years ago.  When Calista was still the young promising european junior, trying to make a carrieer as pro in Thailand, beginning with not too difficult matches.   (and yeah, she did managed just fine although a couple of setbacks).  I dont know what Calistas manager planned.  Did he thought Calista had now matured to meet a strong grandmaster, or did he thought it were nice for Calista to meet another good junior?? And Pheetjeeja, whom at this time abandoned Muay and become a boxer...  Pheetjeeja thus did made here a temporary come back. It was visible she didnt no longer care much about what others thought... Why, she was no longer a Muay fighter:   She did climbed in above the ropes!   And as Pheetjeejas transition into a boxer was now done and complete, she hardly kicked anything.   She just wore down poor Calista with series of heavy punches... Calista was brave, it was visible she was determined to endure whatever was coming... Whatever the costs... But after long and severe battering, enough was enough...  I do admire Calista she did continued and took other difficult matches, becoming even a specialist on Kard Chuek. Thus.  Well done punching and boxing does pays off in Muay too....    🙂   Ps.  Pheetjeeja returned to Muay.  Stronger and better than ever...  She continues her tradition of not using her patented horrible horse kicks against women, but she has become instead a master of elbows...  AND her hard punching, together with her fully mature physical strengh, AND all the technical skills she always had,  makes her a fearsome opponent to any grandmaster.  
    • From your description, my personal advice would be to just use your hands to stress your opponent. Just keep on them, keep touching them, bring the power down, get them holding their breath...and then go for finishes later in the fight with hard weapons (kicks, knees or a power shot). If you are that superior to your opponent. Hands are great stressors. This kind of crescendoing tempo is very "Thai". Touch, touch, touch, touch...damage. Touch, touch, touch, touch...finish.
    • Thank you @Kevin von Duuglas-Ittuthis is helpful.  As I have a lot of respect for traditional muay thai rules, these would always be my goal. I hate to be the farang going for KO to avoid dealing with the intricacies of muay thai scoring. To show understanding of the rules, is to me to respect the art. I'm not sure you would agree, but when Alyssia fought Stamp and won I saw the power of the strong basics of maintaining posture and using kicks as first weapon. I loved it. She didn't use much technique. Just basic muay thai and won.  Newer kind of lethwei is very hand focused and their kicks are of the "stabbing version". Straight butterfly knife stab kicks. Older fights are more similar to muay thai. Exchange of beautiful kicks and only headbutt when it actually serves a purpose. I'm trying to learn this. Rather than the brutal: go forward and attack with no plan and full aggression.  My desire would always be to go for technique. Sadly, seems like my hands are now, when I actually learnt how to transfer power from hip through shoulder to hands, my strongest weapons. But my preference would always be muay thai. I'm not sure, but the refinement Thailand managed to do and the national ownership of the sport is something neighbouring countries could learn from. I also believe, it benefits women fighters.  It's good advice on the 3 round "sensational fights". I just don't like them. But beggars can't be choosers. I'd take any fight if even possible this year.  Fighting under traditional muay thai rules to me are what would benefit me the most in terms of learning. Learning patience, calmness, non-aggresive violence and simply technique.  To be honest, after this exchange I'll work on checking kicks and combine landing kicks following up with punches.  Thank you. Not much in the public space on muay thai scoring. So it's appreciated.   
    • I should add to the above, in case it isn't obvious: You cannot trade landed punches for landed kicks, all other things being equal, in Thailand's traditional Muay Thai. Punching fighters have an additional burden of evidence. I'll also add this. As a female fighter, while the traditional Muay Thai scoring system does not favor you as a punching fighter, you are favored in another way, at least when fighting Thai female fighters. Because they grew into the sport organized around the high scores of kicks (and to a lessor extent knees), they are much more adept at defending them, and much less adept at defending punches (to be very general about it). What you are throwing has an additional burden for scoring, but maybe has a higher chance of landing. You see this play out in the very different 3 round entertainment Muay Thai fights where Thai female fighters are asked to fight well out of their element. They are punch-heavy, no-retreat allowed promotions.
    • A couple of things here. 1. In Thailand's Muay Thai  you can't just "appear unphased" by kicks and knees, and nullify points. Kicks and knees to the body hold the additional "score" of showing control over the body center, just by landing. This is different than punches, which require the physical and psychological effect for score. Yes, by bluffing no impact from kicks and knees you minimize the score, but these are still points against you. 2. It really depends on what you mean by "passive". You need to know what the score is to read the behaviors of both fighters. Thais, traditionally, once they have the lead, retreat and "protect" the lead. This can be read as lacking in aggression by westerners, when in fact this is often pulling away in the fight. If a fighter who is behind in the fight starts marching forward, and throwing a lot...but not having a lot of impact, this fighter would be seen as actually falling further and further behind. They are "chasing". Sharpness in technique does really matter though. It shows self-control, control over the fight space, balance, timing. If you are truly displaying dominance over the fight space, then this will score. I can't quite picture the fight engagement you have in your mind here, but if you are checking kicks and avoiding knees, and landing impactful shots, you should be winning the fight...though that also has to be put in the context of who is advancing, who is retreating, and what the score of the fight is.
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