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Natewoods

Would it be looked down on to not complete road work in a thai gym?

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Hey all, I've been doing Muay Thai on and off for about three years now and am looking to get more serious about it. I'm looking at doing a trip to Thailand for a couple of weeks to train in Chiang mai and or Pattaya October. My conditioning isn't the best, but I'm in decent shape and can do two classes at my gym back to back without much trouble. The only thing I'm a little worried about is road work. I am a godawful runner. Like, I did cross country for my Highschool P.E. credit and I pretty much never improved after the first couple week. I always feel like i'm dying beyond mile two. I've heard most gyms run 5-10k every morning, and that to get the most out of training one should show the coaches that they are willing to give their all. What I'm wondering whether it would be frowned upon to only complete part of the morning run, or walk for sections of it. 

 

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Out of my little training experience in Thailand, I would say as long as you're doing something they most probably will appreciate the effort. I trained at Lamnammoon Muay Thai (in Ubon Ratchatani) for about two months and during that time I saw that most people (foreigners) weren't always doing the full 10k in the morning, and some had to walk or skip altogether because of injuries or exhaustion, etc. Even the Thai fighters didn't always run non-stop. Sometimes they walked, especially in the afternoon run. Also their running pace were usually quite slow. Not that they can't run fast but most often they couldn't be bothered.

That said, the more you run (and the harder) the more the coaches will be content and take you seriously. My coaches basically told me I could fight when they saw how much I ran. Not when they saw how hard I hit or how slick my techniques were (Lol I would still not be ready then). Running is really essential.

You say you're an awful runner, but how many days per week do you run usually? Unless you're a rare exception, your running endurance should definitely improve if you run everyday. It sucks for a while but that's okay. It should stop being awful once you're used to it. Unless you personally want to keep improving your pace for whatever reasons, then running will suck forever haha.

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18 minutes ago, Kero Tide said:

you say you're an awful runner, but how many days per week do you run usually?

Usually zero haha, but I do plan on correcting that. I would definitely say that I've avoided running in favor of jumping rope and bag work for cardio. I've always felt like I'm not really built for distance like a lot of people I know are. I would run almost every day for weeks and never feel any kind of runners high and always be struggling with nausea. I want the coaches to take me seriously though, so I'll try to increase my running leading up to the trip. Thanks for the input!

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10 hours ago, Natewoods said:

Usually zero haha, but I do plan on correcting that. I would definitely say that I've avoided running in favor of jumping rope and bag work for cardio. I've always felt like I'm not really built for distance like a lot of people I know are. I would run almost every day for weeks and never feel any kind of runners high and always be struggling with nausea. I want the coaches to take me seriously though, so I'll try to increase my running leading up to the trip. Thanks for the input!

You gotta do it every day. Running is much more mental than physical. Pick a distance to do every day then make sure you complete it one way or another. 3k for the first week, 5k for the next week, etc. If you have to walk so be it, but complete your miles. Just keep at it and you will get there. I firmly believe that the reason Thais run so much is to build mental toughness as much as it is to build physical strength/endurance. Hence, as Kero said, your trainers will know how much you've been running based on how you fight. If you are timid or inconsistent when clashing with an opponent, they are gonna say you didn't run enough lol. I don't get the whole runner's high thing either and have a strong hatred for running (especially fast). It's necessary though and will teach you to break through moments of weakness. Just get your miles/Km in every day, don't worry about the pace. Good luck and enjoy your trip to Thailand!

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12 hours ago, Tyler Byers said:

 the reason Thais run so much is to build mental toughness as much as it is to build physical strength/endurance. 

I had never even considered that. That's really motivating.  

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Don't decide before you get here that you can't run. Like Kero said, the pace is usually quite slow for most fighters in a gym. When we run in the morning, there's a huge gap between when the fastest runners finish and when the slowest runners catch up. It's not a race, it's what runners would call "junk miles," in that nobody cares how fast or slow you go, it's just that you're doing the work. 

I am 100% in the school of thought that if you don't run, you don't Muay Thai. People who argue otherwise, to me, are making excuses. When you see two fighters in the ring, you can tell with 100% accuracy, every time, who runs and who doesn't. That said, if you literally cannot run but can do something else, like skipping or jumping on the tire for ungodly amounts of time that make up for it, that's good. It's just important that you do something. But the short and blunt answer about whether you'll be looked down on by your gym for not running: yes. How much they judge you will depend on what kind of gym it is - a western-heavy gym where lots of folks don't run, not as much - as well as if you try to make up for it with something else. If you're doing other work to make up for the run, that will be acknowledged.

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Dude, fully agree. Running sucks, def the least fun part of training. But damn does it make a difference after doing it a while. Don't even mean the better gas tank it gives you or the mental thing somebody said, but personally found the shots you throw on pads come out way more powerful, especially body kick.

Actually, be interested to know if anybody has ever got the same benefits from running by doing swimming? Because where I live right now it's cold and rainy. 

Cheeeeers 😁

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On 9/9/2019 at 4:42 PM, Oliver said:

Actually, be interested to know if anybody has ever got the same benefits from running by doing swimming?

I'm curious about this as well. I was just messing around in the pool the other day and was considering running laps in the pool (just did a few laps back and forth). Seems like it really works your legs without all the impact but I haven't tried it for any extended period of time. 

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On 9/9/2019 at 5:42 AM, Oliver said:

 

Actually, be interested to know if anybody has ever got the same benefits from running by doing swimming? Because where I live right now it's cold and rainy. 

Agree. I’m also curious. Also the same benefits from the elipitical, stairmaster or stationary bike??

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About that running point what I experienced is that over here (Europe) for many Muay Thai is hobby, is "some exercise", saying it's already enough to "not get heavier". Whereas others train Muay Thai because it's Muay Thai and they'll do everything they can to improve, including running and strength training and so on.

For my part - I have both knees broken with an ACL, the right knee pretty fine but the left one is wasted that means if I go running my knee's swelling, I can't walk, I can't train. Therefore I prefer training and go the 10km to/from training by bike. Every once in while I go for a run because I feel like but it's not my daily cardio training.

Besides that running is also conditioning your shins, it's just the most easiest way to train cardio. For most of the people it's a lot easier than going biking or swimming. But if you feel more like swimming, go for it. Just do something!

While joining training at a gym in Thailand (just for training, not with the purpose to fight) I didn't feel they look down on you when you don't run. You do it for yourself, not for them. Whereas for fighters there's simply no question about whether to run or not.

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