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I’m 35 and I’m trying to retrain myself to fight but given my age and the amount of time I would need to properly prepare for a fight, I think my fighting days are over. I’m still going to train and spar but most Muay Thai fighters have long since retired by this age. I have the will to fight but are my fighting days over?

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I might be the wrong person to answer this because I’m still a bit of a beginner, lol. But I’m 41 and started training last year and planning on fighting next year. I’ve done a sparring tournament but not full contact.

It’s probably a bit more work as an older person but ask yourself if you would regret not giving it a shot. I’m guessing it would all depend too if you are talking about amateur vs professional, skill level, etc. But IMO, you are far from too old. 

 

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I'm also 35, so I don't think that's too old at all. I plan on another 10 years or more, so long as I can keep doing what I'm doing with adjustments where they're needed. But I do think that as a caveat, you just have to consider what YOU think is enough. A guy at my gym the other day asked me whether I think someone could fight, training only one session per day. I said for sure, but you'd really have to put the work in during that one session. I think you could fight with NO training, but it's about what you want out of your fights and what you want out of your training.

So, if you think you're to old, probably that's going to direct your mind a lot. If you think otherwise, you can go farther.

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I've stopped thinking there's any such thing as being too old to do anything. Not out of my own experience obviously as I'm still only 28. But I keep seeing and hearing of people doing all kinds of incredible things at all kinds of ages.

Here's Kru Rengrad (red short) one of my coach when I was at Lamnammoon's Muay Thai gym taking a fight in his 50s and smashing it (I don't remember exactly the date of that fight but it wasn't long ago):

 

Also the oldest marathoner is, as far as we know, a man called Fauja Singh from East London who ran his last race at 101yo back in 2013 - and it appears that he didn't start young. (https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-21565970/oldest-marathon-runner-fauja-singh-s-final-race)

I see no reason why you wouldn't shine. 😀

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I don't think 35 is too old at all! We've had people in their 40s join our team and fight for the first time and do really well. A lot of fighters stop by 35 because they've been doing it a long time and want something different or feel like they are slowing down. Part of that is the amount of wear and tear they have after training and fighting for more than 20 years though. They've been pounding on their body for decades. A vehicle made in 1983 with low miles will still run just fine 🙂 

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25 minutes ago, Kaitlin Rose Young said:

I don't think 35 is too old at all! We've had people in their 40s join our team and fight for the first time and do really well. A lot of fighters stop by 35 because they've been doing it a long time and want something different or feel like they are slowing down. Part of that is the amount of wear and tear they have after training and fighting for more than 20 years though. They've been pounding on their body for decades. A vehicle made in 1983 with low miles will still run just fine 🙂 

One of my coaches and I were just talking about this exact thing today. Older people who are just starting haven’t experienced the injuries and overuse issues. My body, after manufacturing and birthing 4 children in 7 years, needs a LOT of conditioning to get up to speed. But otherwise, I’m starting fairly fresh. 

There are lots of advantages of having a more mature perspective too. 

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Thank you everyone! That’s great news. I don’t feel old, just a lot wiser and just think i’m getting old. Really i’m in the best shape I’ve been since graduating HS and never have felt as confident as i do now. I’m happy to hear that there’s people still fighting who aren’t in their 20’s anymore. That’s really all the motivation i need to pursue this possibility in the future.

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I've met folks that had their first fight when they were about 40-45 and their grit is insane! They keep saying to me things like, I've got so much to catch up on you younger kids (I'm 26 lol), etc. But to be perfectly honest and as cheesy as its sounds, age is just a number. Once you've put your heart, your mind and your soul into achieving that goal, it's never too late. 

 

Can't wait to see your progress! Best of luck to everything! 

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Personally I started training Muay Thai at 35 (I'm 36 now) and very out of shape. Used to practice Fillippino Pekiti Tirsia Kali for some 8 years before but that was years ago, too.

Had to take a bit of a break from seriously training for a while because we moved and whatnot but I will get back into it soon. Don't know yet if I want to actually fight or if sparring is enough for me but I don't really feel like my age would not permit that.

When I started I was like: "I'm 35 now and look, Saenchai is 38 so I still have time" :P 😉

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On 5/10/2019 at 9:42 PM, CSIBMOD said:

There are lots of advantages of having a more mature perspective too. 

May I ask what those advantages might be? As someone who likes to bring lessons from the gym to real life, I feel like being 26 in the gym isnt too bad.

 

However, being 26 and working to be a doctor when all my classmates are 21 and below does ride hard on me.

Edited by SPACEDOODLE
I hit "reply" too early lol
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There are real things about age one has to take into consideration BUT if you do that then there is no reason not to compete. I train way differently than I did when I was 20 (48 now) because of injuries etc but its made it so I could compete now if I wanted to. Its just being realistic about who you are now vs how you were then. Too many remember the past but dont consider the now. Thankfully, starting later kind of makes that a moot point. Its all new. If you were my student, Id say do it. 

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On 6/1/2019 at 8:37 PM, Coach James Poidog said:

There are real things about age one has to take into consideration BUT if you do that then there is no reason not to compete. I train way differently than I did when I was 20 (48 now) because of injuries, etc. Thankfully, starting later kind of makes that a moot point. Its all new. If you were my student, Id say do it. 

I started training at age 18 but at that time I decided i’d rather be skateboarding and so I spent the past 17 years mostly skating but still having a Muay Thai interest. So even though I don’t have fight injuries; i have tendon issues in my right ankle that snap back on me from time to time causing pretty acute pain. I think i have a rotator cuff issue in my shoulder as well, but I think you’re right about training differently when you’re older with injuries. You just train smarter. If i were your student I would seriously consider it.

Edited by T. Vitayanuvatti
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On 6/1/2019 at 7:30 PM, SPACEDOODLE said:

May I ask what those advantages might be? 

I’m just now seeing this! The advantages are that most people have a bit more humility and understand their challenges and limitations as well as their strengths. Not saying that this isn’t possible for younger people but for most, getting older means getting more grounded. And life experience helps to gain a bit of perspective, I think. Hard to explain until one experiences it. 

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On 5/10/2019 at 5:28 PM, Kero Tide said:

I've stopped thinking there's any such thing as being too old to do anything. Not out of my own experience obviously as I'm still only 28. But I keep seeing and hearing of people doing all kinds of incredible things at all kinds of ages.

Here's Kru Rengrad (red short) one of my coach when I was at Lamnammoon's Muay Thai gym taking a fight in his 50s and smashing it (I don't remember exactly the date of that fight but it wasn't long ago):

 

Also the oldest marathoner is, as far as we know, a man called Fauja Singh from East London who ran his last race at 101yo back in 2013 - and it appears that he didn't start young. (https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-21565970/oldest-marathon-runner-fauja-singh-s-final-race)

I see no reason why you wouldn't shine. 😀

I can’t LOVE your reply and these facts/videos you shared any more. 

Just awesome. Thank you.

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I’m going to quote Sean Fagan the Muay Thai guy here and say very loudly and with a frown “ FUCK NO you’re NOT TOO OLD!!!!!! 😡🥊

lol. Sean Fagan cracks me up. ( he’s very serious about muay thai but he acts goofy on occasion for fun and I love that. Life’s hard. Muay Thai is hard. Ya gotta laugh when you can imho 🤣🤷🏻‍♀️🤣)

 

also PLEASE anyone who has any thought in their head they may be ‘too old’ for Muay Thai and especially for fighting - watch this video!!! 

also TO ADMIN HERE can I please punch anyone in the face who is ONLY 35 ( still young!) who calls themselves old?😑 Is that allowed??? 🤣 just kidding. Sorta.🤣

 

seriously watch this video 👇

https://www.muay-thai-guy.com/blog/muay-thai-mondays-how-old-is-too-old-to-start-fighting

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13 hours ago, MadelineGrace said:

...

also TO ADMIN HERE can I please punch anyone in the face who is ONLY 35 ( still young!) who calls themselves old?😑 Is that allowed??? 🤣 just kidding. Sorta.🤣

...

I'm 36 now, but: Punch me! punch me! I need to work on my defense anyways! 🤺

Sidenote: there is this guy at my gym who is somewhere in his 40s I think (don't know his exact age) and while he was in no bad shape when he first came in he was not very experienced but he told the trainers he wanted to fight. some people didn't think he would get there but a while back he actually had his first fight (K1, its difficult to find Muay Thai fights in Germany) and it seems he pretty much smashed it. I wasn't there but I know he won and I think meanwhile he got a second win under his belt. not 100% sure though, haven't met him in a while.

Edited by Xestaro
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On 5/10/2019 at 6:02 PM, T. Vitayanuvatti said:

I’m 35 and I’m trying to retrain myself to fight but given my age and the amount of time I would need to properly prepare for a fight, I think my fighting days are over. I’m still going to train and spar but most Muay Thai fighters have long since retired by this age. I have the will to fight but are my fighting days over?

I had a beer with some fighters yesterday including Keng Sarikadong. He is 36  works as trainer on Samui and just won the King's Cup.

If your body is fit, why not? You write the book of your life. Would you want to read it?

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On 5/10/2019 at 1:02 PM, T. Vitayanuvatti said:

I’m 35 and I’m trying to retrain myself to fight but given my age and the amount of time I would need to properly prepare for a fight, I think my fighting days are over. I’m still going to train and spar but most Muay Thai fighters have long since retired by this age. I have the will to fight but are my fighting days over?

I think Age, nowadays with diets and exercise and new technologies, is not a realy good metric anymore. I know guys in their 40s absolutely smashing it and guys in their 20s being in pain. Each body is different, each mind is different as well. If you take care of your body, train correctly, have a good lifestyle and diet, the only limitation is when your body says "Stop man, it's over". If you feel good, resistant, energetic, don't worry about age. 

I began Muay Thai 3 months ago and I turned 29 last month. My goal is to have at least a professional fight in Thailand. So I might be old for competition standards, but if I want it, I'll deliver. 

Edited by Nicolas
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