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Which Brand Of Boxing Gloves Do You Prefer?


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Hi Folks

Two questions:

1. What size glove do you use for training? Do you use a different OZ for bag work vs pad work vs sparring etc...?

2. What brand do you use/prefer and why?

I have a pair of Punch Trophy Getters that I bought years ago before I ever started muay thai. I also have a crappy pair of Adidas that I bought while in NZ that sit in the cupboard because the Punch are better. Both are 16 oz and I use the Punch for everything.

Should I be using a lighter weight for bag work?

This may be silly, but I think maybe I should be using the Adidas now because as I learn to punch better I might want a better, stronger pair of gloves to protect my hands. Whereas right now I don't punch that hard and could probably get away with wearing the Adidas. I'm assuming one day I'll punch like Foreman and just be shredding heavy bags daily. :sorcerer:

 

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I use 12oz sparing gloves by Dragon. I'm not happy with the fit though. I also sometimes use 16oz gloves (don't know the brand) in sparing. They have a nice snug fit, but are so heavy! :)

My first MT trainer gave a nice piece of advice: if you're below 70kg - buy 10oz gloves, if you're above, buy 12oz. This applies to beginners mainly, but gives a hint at the fact that the heavier you are, the heavier your gloves should be.

I found a nice guide for boxing gloves, it gets even more detailed there: here's the article.

I think you need to take to heart especially this one:

 

 

Proper Fit – Make sure your gloves will fit you right WITH HANDWRAPS ON. Put on some hand-wraps and see if the gloves is snug around the wraps. Brands vary in size around your fist. Make sure you are able to make an easy comfortable fist inside your boxing gloves.

I bought mine online and even though the weight is the same as I had before (12oz) my hand don't sit comfortably in this type.

Before I had synthetic Masters gloves, and they were okay, but lasted only less than a year. Now i got real-leather ones and the quality is better, but they stink the same ;)

There was also a recent link on Muay Thai Guy's page about what weight of gloves should you train with: here's the article.

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I just have 1 pair of gloves, they're 10oz Twins gloves. I love them personally, the brand itself just happens to be one of the most common I see here. Before when I did boxing I had 14oz Everlast gloves which were incredibly flimsy.

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Windy 16 oz.- my hands were permanently swollen going 9 hours/week (never did stand up before),                                                                                                              Title Gel World Bag Gloves 16 oz. allowed me to train while my hands healed (2 months- even light punching hurt w/ Windy),                                                                     I then developed the bad habit of not punching with my knuckles so I got Fairtex 12 oz. in order to feel the knuckles better. I spar w/ the Windys (no longer hurt my hands). I'm 5'9", 190 lbs.

I really like the feel of the Fairtex 12 oz. Tight at first but perfect now w/out wraps.      Also, both Windy and Fairtex are a breeze to put on, Titles are a pain.

Anyone have tips on avoiding swamp gloves?  I put cedar chip socks in my gloves every day but they NEVER dry out.

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A lot of food for thought here... more complex than I thought. I will never hit anything hard without wraps now, I feel my wrist flex too much when I hit stuff even with wraps. It would be interesting to pick up a pair of 14oz or 12oz just to see the difference.

Windy 16 oz.- my hands were permanently swollen going 9 hours/week (never did stand up before),                                                                                                              Title Gel World Bag Gloves 16 oz. allowed me to train while my hands healed (2 months- even light punching hurt w/ Windy),                                                                     I then developed the bad habit of not punching with my knuckles so I got Fairtex 12 oz. in order to feel the knuckles better. I spar w/ the Windys (no longer hurt my hands). I'm 5'9", 190 lbs.

I really like the feel of the Fairtex 12 oz. Tight at first but perfect now w/out wraps.      Also, both Windy and Fairtex are a breeze to put on, Titles are a pain.

Anyone have tips on avoiding swamp gloves?  I put cedar chip socks in my gloves every day but they NEVER dry out.

There are these little deoderizing pouches you can buy from some equipment stores now. Otherwise, maybe get a second pair and alternate daily?

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Thanks all for the good tips. I will look for the deodorizers or spray.

'Needing' the 2nd pair is a good excuse but I'm sure I'd get sideways looks at home:)

 

I'm definitely loving feeling the knuckles but for sure my wrists are vulnerable. Sometimes I tape.

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I've always used 16oz (Raja, and they've lasted forever! I swear by them) and I'm made fun of for having huge gloves, lol! I have 12oz now and they fit awesomely but I've always been told to spar with 14oz or 16oz, nothing smaller. Anyone been told something similar? I'm 4'9" 48kg.

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I used to use Fairtex BVG1 or BVG5 16oz for everything (Don't really like the BVG5 but I got them for free)

Now for:

Sparring: Fairtex BVG1 16oz (was never allowed to spar with anything smaller)

Padwork/Bag: Yokkao 10oz (the wristband is too big for my hands though lol)

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Anyone have tips on avoiding swamp gloves?  I put cedar chip socks in my gloves every day but they NEVER dry out.

Sunlight is amazing at helping avoid swamp gloves. If you have lace ups, open up the laces and let them sit in the sun. If you have Velcro (booooooooo Velcro!) try to keep them open somehow. Ceder chips are a great idea. I also buy Dr. Scholl's inserts that are for stinky feet and stick those suckers inside gloves when they're not in use.

(Golden, CO eh? I'm from Boulder.)

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I have 12 oz Fairtex for sparring. I'm small, so 12 oz is generally okay for me but sometimes trainers put the Mickey Mouse gloves on me that are 16 oz. Those aren't common out here though; each of my gyms only has two pair of 16 oz.

I own bag gloves that are 4 oz, I forget the brand. I used them for bagwork when I was at Lanna because the owner told me to but I didn't see a big difference in the toughness of my hands or strength of my shoulders, which is what he said they were good for. Then a different trainer told me to wear heavier gloves on the bag because the weight of the gloves would make me stronger. So, now I just use my regular 6 oz gloves (ThaiSmai - my favorite brand) for padwork and bagwork. I have two pair but they're exactly the same other than color - one is for AM, one is for PM.

Bag gloves are great for actually feeling exactly how you're hitting and getting your knuckles into it. But there's very little support so you have to wrap your hands well. I like hitting the bag with the little gloves but I can't attest as to whether or not it does anything. It just feels good.

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I use 8 oz lace up twins as they are all I have left right now!! but I favour top king as they have great wrist support so ill buy them when I can, I sometimes use bag gloves and I do like them but my skin sheds lol I don't know is that toughening or what lol I spar normally in my same gloves but if it's going to be a bit hard ill put 12 oz on

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post-183-0-75484600-1432864339_thumb.jpg

My future ex-gloves...

 

Sylvie, if you and Kevin are ever in Boulder, please stop by Duane Ludwig's new academy in Westminster.  He's been open since November (that's where I started stand up).  Great vibe and Duane's a madman.  20 min. from Boulder!

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Machina are smaller, more form fitting american gloves that I swear by for bag work. I wouldn't and haven't gone below 10oz for pads or bags but currently use Twins in both 10oz and 12oz

My sparring gloves are fancy Twins I n 16 and I swear by them. I broke my pinky and for two months I haven't used my cross but in clinch and in sparring life in general, the fancies have protected them.

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I've always used 16oz (Raja, and they've lasted forever! I swear by them) and I'm made fun of for having huge gloves, lol! I have 12oz now and they fit awesomely but I've always been told to spar with 14oz or 16oz, nothing smaller. Anyone been told something similar? I'm 4'9" 48kg.

I initially bought 12 oz before I started muay thai. I wanted to use them at a mma class. Another student told me to take them back and get 16s because he wouldn't want to spar me in 12s.

The other night at boxing a guy was wearing a pair of winnings that actually looked comical, must have been 18s or 20s.

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Both my sparring and bag gloves were designed by Master Toddy and made at the factory he has at the gym (you can see more of his gear here)

For sparring, I use 14oz gloves. I've had these ones since Feb 2013 and they're still going strong, even after pretty much daily sparring since then, which is pretty awesome.

gloves.jpg

I use bag gloves for everything else: padwork, bagwork and sometimes in clinching. I really love these ones because they're so small that I can feel exactly how my punches are landing. I've found that they've really helped me to work on my accuracy. Other gloves that were bigger or shaped differently weren't quite as comfortable for me. They either didn't allow me to make a proper fist or to turn my knuckles down enough to land correctly. I like that I can feel everything when I wear these, and I've never had any wrist problems or anything like that. 

I got both sets custom-made with a smaller wrist because I have tiny hands, but the bag gloves were the ones I was most specific about. For those, I had to get them to make me a special size somewhere in between 'small' and 'kids size', asked for velcro around the wrists to make it more snug and secure, and an open-thumb, because I just prefer them that way. Having small hands makes it awkward buying gloves, so I'm glad I've got these ones!

20150603_105844.jpg

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I used 10oz twins for everything for about 3ish years, and they're still in great condition. But now I got bag gloves which I use just for the bag, this is just to help feel where my knuckles land, as sometimes I get lazy on the bag as no one really corrects me. 

I don't use a bigger size then 10oz for sparring as I can control my power quite well. Also I don't like to use big gloves as I know some people who used 16oz ALL the time for sparring, then when they had to fight in 10oz they realised that it completely changed their guard, and that they also felt the punches land on their guard a lot more.

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