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Oliver

Alcohol and Muay Thai - Moderation or Abstinence?

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Hey everyone 😊

Wondered what people thought about an issue that doesn't get raised much if ever in the open - but noticed fighters have strong opinions either way in private. You guys all sound fairly well schooled in Thai in your countries, so be interested to hear ideas 

On the subject of drinking, do you guys follow the traditional old school view of no alcohol at all, or the more modern everything in moderation view. 

Personally, never drank in training for  fights, but still loved to kick back and party afterwards. But even this is having a horrible effect on my body and ability to feel right and in tune afterwards. 

Oh yeah, also tend to be living in disturbingly alcohol cultures the last few years, where it's a huge part of every day life and everyone expects you to be part of it. Even ppl in the gym

Thanks a lot 😀👊🏼

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I'm not sure one can advise about mind- or mood-altering substances over the internet, but it is pretty amazing how devastating alcohol can be to ex-fighters in Thailand. Of course alcoholism a problem all over the world, but there is something about it and Muay Thai that has a deep cultural groove to it, and a fairly strong moral judgement as well, it seems.

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Cheers man, yeah have seen older trainers who day drink and smoke a pack a day, and been shocked when they offer me a can or a smoke. So have you found good active fighters still maintain a no booze at all approach?

Have trained with some Thais like this, who probably wouldn't touch a drop on their birthdays, and some who stack up on Leo after a win and get together to get fucked up. But then back to being sober and training right after.

Wondered which was more common. And to anybody reading, how you find drinking affects your body's ability to recover.

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 Since I started working out six times a week sometimes twice a day I gave up my moderate ( at most ) alcohol consumption and now I just drink on a very infrequent basis. I can’t afford to not feel my best at my workouts. (If I was still young and single I’d probably drink a little more) but now I focus on adequate sleep, fuel, hydration and very limited/infrequent alcohol 

i want to feel my best. Sometimes I get

’ tired’ during the work outs or class but don’t give up. ( plus there is no option to give up during my Muay Thai class. You do what he says. Period. Only exception is an injury 🤣🤷🏻‍♀️)  If I drank I’d think i’d just suck wind and not be at my best. Not worth it to me. 

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On 12/9/2019 at 8:32 AM, MadelineGrace said:

 

i want to feel my best. Sometimes I geti 'tired’ during the work outs or class but don’t give up. ( plus there is no option to give up during my Muay Thai class. You do what he says. Period. Only exception is an injury 🤣🤷🏻‍♀️)  If I drank I’d think i’d just suck wind and not be at my best. Not worth it to me. 

Agreed, 💯.

Since first posting this question on the forum, have given up all booze for good now. Feel way way better, and don't even miss it.

But maybe wasn't much of a sacrifice, never was a big drinker anyway. Seems like it's one of those things that's just socially expected of you.

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19 hours ago, Oliver said:

Agreed, 💯.

Since first posting this question on the forum, have given up all booze for good now. Feel way way better, and don't even miss it.

But maybe wasn't much of a sacrifice, never was a big drinker anyway. Seems like it's one of those things that's just socially expected of you.

I hate that part. Some people even act like their fun is gone when you don't drink... hahaha

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1 hour ago, 515 said:

I hate that part. Some people even act like their fun is gone when you don't drink... hahaha

Exactly. Worst is when you're only with one other person and you tell them you don't mind if they drink, that they should go for it. But then they get all butthurt and miserable and confused.

Like wtf, why does it matter to them. 

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This is a somewhat complicated question in that, especially in Thailand, there's a moral component to alcohol consumption that will be included in how it's viewed by your gym. Trainers who drink aren't viewed as super dependable by those who don't, students who drink are socially engaging with those trainers, but will also be dismissed in some ways by those in the gym who don't. If you're showing up and working hard, you'll be appreciated for that. If you're tired and drained - even if it's occasional - and it's known that the reason behind it is that you were out drinking, you'll be judged for that in addition to what you'd be chastised for if you were just having a "bad" day. 

I'm in the same school as Madeline, where I just can't afford feeling shittier than I would if it were simply a rough night of sleep or being tired from the work I'm already doing. So, I abstain for the same reasons I don't eat sugar or stay up too late to watch Netflix or whatever else. If it's compromising my training, it goes. But people have different goals and different motivations. The 5AM runs make me a total asshole for the day and I still go do those, so we all make compromises, hahaha.

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On 1/16/2020 at 9:43 PM, Oliver said:

Agreed, 💯.

Since first posting this question on the forum, have given up all booze for good now. Feel way way better, and don't even miss it.

But maybe wasn't much of a sacrifice, never was a big drinker anyway. Seems like it's one of those things that's just socially expected of you.

I quit drinking several years ago, except for once or twice a year when I have one or two. A few things happened. First, I feel so, so much better and my sleep got so, SO much better. I actually feel less stressed than I did before when I drank to relax. And my friends and family who drink started being weird about it. I don’t try to convert people but it seems as though they take it that way when I turn down a drink. My mom hasn’t seen me with any type of alcohol for probably 5 years but still tries to get me to drink during the holidays. 
 

The culture around alcohol is strange. Well, at least in the US which is the only place I can speak with any authority. Lol

 

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I think your answer will revolve around your reasons for training in thailand whether you should be drinking or not... however I do recall a thai trainer saying, for every drink you run an extra km!

A bit of punishment to acknowledge before you sip 🤣

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