Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi there-

Question.  I read that Sylvie does it but how does one go about getting their own fights without the gym or trainer involved.  I've had some really bad experiences and have lost out on a lot of money training.  I'm about to give up on Thailand and never go back but I'm a fighter and I hate it when someone stops me from something because they don't keep their word.  I have actually started to learn Thai for one more shot a year from now but in the meantime, I'm trying to figure out how to better take care of myself and not lose more money on gyms and trainers.

 

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, Victoria Pitt said:

I read that Sylvie does it but how does one go about getting their own fights without the gym or trainer involved.

This is very, very difficult to do. Really almost impossible among the promoters and stadia we know, because it is not encouraged. Things may have changed since we first became familiar with the situation, I know several people have tried based on what Sylvie has described for herself, I haven't heard of one regularly successful person. A primary reason for this difficulty is that promoters count on the dependability of gyms and their liaisons. Gyms let them know how skilled a fighter is so there can be a good match (something they assess as you train with them), and then maybe even more importantly, gyms filter out undependable people. The promoter needs people to show up on cards. And lastly, and most importantly, these are very enduring relationships between gyms and promoters. The people involved have known each other for a decade or two usually. These are foundational bonds. In Thailand it's very unusual to go outside of these kinds of channels.

The only reason why Sylvie was able to break out of this was a kind of perfect storm situation. She had already established herself as incredibly dependable as a fighter in Chiang Mai. I think she had already fought maybe 70 fights in the city. So when we moved to Pattaya, far from Chiang Mai, the trust issue was already there. Everyone knew her skill level, and everyone knew she was extremely dependable.

On top of that Sylvie's Thai got really good, which greased the communication wheels.

There may have been people who have found their way around the usual channels, but in Thailand you really need to have someone speaking for you, vouching for you. Sylvie's kind of a unicorn in this because she has created her own very solid reputation, something she could never have done without the help of her gym in Chiang Mai for the first several years.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see.   😞

I have lost faith in what people have told me.  I'm almost thinking that the powers that be just don't want me to fight.  I really don't know where to turn at this point because I don't trust any gyms or trainers anymore. This is why I started to learn Thai so that I COULD speak for myself and know what is being said around me.

 

I don't want to give up on this but I feel that unless I'm a 20 year old, 55kg hot chick, there is no way I'm ever going to get on a card.  And that burns because I've seen some- no A LOT - of western fighters way, way, way worse than I am fighting.

 

Thanks for the response.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, Victoria Pitt said:

I don't want to give up on this but I feel that unless I'm a 20 year old, 55kg hot chick, there is no way I'm ever going to get on a card.

That's crazy (by our experience). Just go to Chiang Mai. Find a gym that fights a lot. There are female fight cards in the city every night of the week.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey @Victoria Pitt I got a fight outside of a gym. Friend knew a promoter who set it up without knowing me or my skill level (in English). I guess based on him trusting my friend. All was very ok and decent as far as I know. I'm now connected to the promoter who wanted to set up another fight. However he's going through some tough financial times atm unfortunately and will most likely travel abroad for work very soon. 

Heard great stuff about Sitjemam and Santai up in the north when it comes to fighting opportunities for women. 

So sorry about this. They been promising you fights that never materialize while you keep paying training fees?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you go into a little more detail regarding bad experiences/losing money? You don't have to name gyms or people, I'm just trying to understand the situation more clearly. Like are you paying for training somewhere wanting to fight and they aren't finding you fights? What is your experience level and how old are you? What area do you want to fight in and what weight do you fight at? Are you living in Thailand or just coming to train and fight when you can? 

I ask so many questions because sometimes it is just difficult to find matchups for certain people and the trainers or gym will simply give up without telling you (for a variety of reasons). I for example struggle to make 70 kg and only have 3 fights. This makes it difficult to find Thais for me to fight because a lot the ones over 70 kg are typically older and much more experienced than I am since they have basically retired and gotten fat lol. However my trainers are very adamant about me only fighting Thais and won't even bother looking for other foreigners for me to fight. A lot of promoters also see my age and just brush me off without even looking at training videos because by Thai standards I am ancient. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah to respond to everyone:

My age.  I'm older but no lie, nobody has a clue until I tell them and I show them my passport.  They peg me for 10 years younger than I am- and they've seen me in the ring so they know I don't move like I'm about to die in the nursing home. 

Yes, I pay fees, promised to fight then they they don't do it.  Always wait until last min to try to find an opponent if at all.. but hey let me pay to go to the stadium so I can "meet" the promoter who I never meet but I just paid $1300 BHT to watch fights I really don't care about and wouldn't pay to go see.

My age has never come up.  My size has but there is Thai girl in that area who is actually bigger than I am in addition to the fact that where I was is mostly farang anyway.  I have no problem fighting a westerner- I figured I'd have to anyway.

I save up my money then come for a few months to train and hopefully fight. I've done that three times now.  This last time really hurt as I was gone three months and wasn't working- I had finished my contract. So I blew my savings to go to Thailand because I was told THIS time I would fight and it didn't happen.  I was told I would be taken care of and that absolutely didn't happen.  I was basically ignored.

If I were to read this and not know me or see me in the ring I would think "well she must be terrible then".  Let me play devil's advocate on that one for a moment.  If that is the case, let me fight and get KO'd and that would end me bitching about wanting to fight.

I have to find a job now (I came home on Monday) and try to pay off my bills, save up again, and try to come back. That means another year here in the states before I can attempt Thailand again.  I AM NOT GETTING ANY YOUNGER.  Not going to lie- I'm livid, I'm pissed, and I'm hurt.  I know because I know my body better than anyone, I still have been gifted with a little more time than most people. I have adjust my training accordingly. I am tough as nails and I have no fear.  But I am realistic... if it doesn't happen in the next two years, then my clock really is up.  I'm not trying to be some regional champion or anything like that. I just want a fight or two. I've trained for over 7 years and never fought- I was supposed to but I tore my ACL.  It's been a battle to get in that ring and so frustrating.  I could go on and on and whine but I don't want to.  I just know the only way it will happen is if I take care of myself because I cannot trust gyms/trainers.

I have been told to look at Chang Mai or Bangkok.

All I want to do is spend a few months training hard, a fight or three come home and it will be out of my system (maybe).  But at this point I am beyond frustrated... and I need to find a job as this last big mistake cost me financially quite badly.  I would have been happy to eat it if I had crossed off something on my list but my last trip to Thailand was a NIGHTMARE which hurts me because I was so in love with it there.  I just feel... abused.  LOL.

 

But... the fighter in me doesn't want to quit or let this go. I train hard. I do the work.  I deserve to get KO'd if that is what they think is going to happen.  

Sorry for the long windedness.  I just don't know how to express how disappointed, hurt and broken I felt/feel about this whole experience.

  • Like 3
  • Respect 1
  • Cool 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

45 minutes ago, Victoria Pitt said:

I have been told to look at Chang Mai or Bangkok

Bangkok does not have a lot of female fights. People are drawn to there because it's the capital, but it is definitely NOT the capital for female fighting. Given your frustrations I would say avoid Bangkok. Chiang Mai has lots and lots and lots of fight cards with women on them. Bangkok almost none.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, Victoria Pitt said:

Yes, I pay fees, promised to fight then they they don't do it.  Always wait until last min to try to find an opponent if at all.. but hey let me pay to go to the stadium so I can "meet" the promoter who I never meet but I just paid $1300 BHT to watch fights I really don't care about and wouldn't pay to go see.

What part of the country are you? Phuket? One of the islands? Just to understand where this is happening.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was in Phuket.   I am back in the US now.

And you are the third person to say "Chiang Mai."  I do like the night market there the best of the one's I've seen so far.  I got my sak yants there.  I think that it is a sign.  I know its way cheaper there than in Phuket and the only woman I trust to touch my hair in Thailand is there.  The question is will there be fights at 65 or 70 kg because that is as low as I can go.  I am not a tall woman- I just am a very thick one.   But I have seen fights with women my size, at least in Phuket I have.   

I just need a good gym and trainer that I can trust.  I'm so easy going and laid back- except when you say you are going to do something, you have to do it- that does irk me.  Again, thanks for listening to me.  My heart is broken over it... but I think I do want to give it one more shot- especially since I've invested this much time into learning the Thai alphabet and slowly reading.. (hahaha).  I just want my shot. 

 

Thanks.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Super common though, happens all the time to guys and girls, of all weights. You get your fights cancelled all the time at the last minute, or get told to fight the night before when something opens up. Just gotta go with it.

It's probably not trainers or gym owners deliberately trying to screw you.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Victoria Pitt said:

Ah to respond to everyone:

My age.  I'm older but no lie, nobody has a clue until I tell them and I show them my passport.  They peg me for 10 years younger than I am- and they've seen me in the ring so they know I don't move like I'm about to die in the nursing home. 

Yes, I pay fees, promised to fight then they they don't do it.  Always wait until last min to try to find an opponent if at all.. but hey let me pay to go to the stadium so I can "meet" the promoter who I never meet but I just paid $1300 BHT to watch fights I really don't care about and wouldn't pay to go see.

My age has never come up.  My size has but there is Thai girl in that area who is actually bigger than I am in addition to the fact that where I was is mostly farang anyway.  I have no problem fighting a westerner- I figured I'd have to anyway.

I save up my money then come for a few months to train and hopefully fight. I've done that three times now.  This last time really hurt as I was gone three months and wasn't working- I had finished my contract. So I blew my savings to go to Thailand because I was told THIS time I would fight and it didn't happen.  I was told I would be taken care of and that absolutely didn't happen.  I was basically ignored.

If I were to read this and not know me or see me in the ring I would think "well she must be terrible then".  Let me play devil's advocate on that one for a moment.  If that is the case, let me fight and get KO'd and that would end me bitching about wanting to fight.

I have to find a job now (I came home on Monday) and try to pay off my bills, save up again, and try to come back. That means another year here in the states before I can attempt Thailand again.  I AM NOT GETTING ANY YOUNGER.  Not going to lie- I'm livid, I'm pissed, and I'm hurt.  I know because I know my body better than anyone, I still have been gifted with a little more time than most people. I have adjust my training accordingly. I am tough as nails and I have no fear.  But I am realistic... if it doesn't happen in the next two years, then my clock really is up.  I'm not trying to be some regional champion or anything like that. I just want a fight or two. I've trained for over 7 years and never fought- I was supposed to but I tore my ACL.  It's been a battle to get in that ring and so frustrating.  I could go on and on and whine but I don't want to.  I just know the only way it will happen is if I take care of myself because I cannot trust gyms/trainers.

I have been told to look at Chang Mai or Bangkok.

All I want to do is spend a few months training hard, a fight or three come home and it will be out of my system (maybe).  But at this point I am beyond frustrated... and I need to find a job as this last big mistake cost me financially quite badly.  I would have been happy to eat it if I had crossed off something on my list but my last trip to Thailand was a NIGHTMARE which hurts me because I was so in love with it there.  I just feel... abused.  LOL.

 

But... the fighter in me doesn't want to quit or let this go. I train hard. I do the work.  I deserve to get KO'd if that is what they think is going to happen.  

Sorry for the long windedness.  I just don't know how to express how disappointed, hurt and broken I felt/feel about this whole experience.

Oooh I feel for you! I'm so sorry about this experience.

Recently at my gym we had a guy who is clearly more than middle aged, not very fit, not that experienced, tall and heavy and not a long time customer. He got a fight within 2 weeks. Which he won and he was very friendly but still it feels unfair. These things happen.

I've also met a very experienced female fighter tall and around 65-70kilo. In Thailand longtime. She told me she gave up on fighting because a fight would be announced get postponed and in the end taking 6 months...to her not worth that hassle. 

It's so hard advocating for yourself and as a woman there's so much bullshit on top of everything else. And displaying any kind of negative emotion about it will only break down communication completely. To me only thing that has worked is being patient, friendly and trying to get sympathy. Showing you are sad without blaming anyone has proved to be useful. 

But it's not easy. 

  • Like 2
  • Respect 1
  • Cool 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, LengLeng said:

Oooh I feel for you! I'm so sorry about this experience.

Recently at my gym we had a guy who is clearly more than middle aged, not very fit, not that experienced, tall and heavy and not a long time customer. He got a fight within 2 weeks. Which he won and he was very friendly but still it feels unfair. These things happen.

I've also met a very experienced female fighter tall and around 65-70kilo. In Thailand longtime. She told me she gave up on fighting because a fight would be announced get postponed and in the end taking 6 months...to her not worth that hassle. 

It's so hard advocating for yourself and as a woman there's so much bullshit on top of everything else. And displaying any kind of negative emotion about it will only break down communication completely. To me only thing that has worked is being patient, friendly and trying to get sympathy. Showing you are sad without blaming anyone has proved to be useful. 

But it's not easy. 

Yeah, the sympathy thing doesn't work for me because I don't look like a small, cute, pretty girl. Too strong, rides a motorcycle and not a scooter, tattoos, etc.  They don't feel sorry for me at all. I can get into it but I do see how I get treated in comparison to some others and it isn't the same.  I wish they would treat me like I am a woman like everyone else but I don't get that at all, I've noticed.  But that's a different topic for another forum, I think.

And I have seen the WORST STUFF with men getting fights who absolutely should not be getting them.  But I can't really look at that because there are far more men than there are women and they will sometimes just grab a drunk off the street who did Muay Thai 30 years ago just to give that guy a fight.  I call it the "I went to Thailand to Fight" Tourist package. Old guy says he wants to fight, pays a lot of money to the gym, gets the fight before he leaves with a tuk-tuk driver and gets the photo as proof even though the fight is beyond shocking and sad to watch.  Maybe I'm no different as I've come several times to fight myself.  

I really think I will try my luck in Chang Mai in a year if my body still feels good and I managed to save the money up again.  I will try to contact the gyms ahead of time though.  Again, I've been working really hard on learning Thai and I'm actually making progress with the reading part.. the speaking part... ha- well... I have time to get it down.  But I think it will help me with this.

I'm also going to try to get some kickboxing fights here in the US. I think its harder because of my age HERE than where I was in Thailand.  There are a lot of reasons why I didn't want to do that in the US but that way I might have some video that I would actually be interesting to put on a card.

Or maybe I should just jump off a cliff.  😡😖

But I will keep trying.  I loosely have a plan of what I need to do and registered for Revgear in October hoping I get an opponent.  That will be my first shot of getting some video of me in action.  I've worked too hard to give this up, I think.

  • Respect 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Oliver said:

Super common though, happens all the time to guys and girls, of all weights. You get your fights cancelled all the time at the last minute, or get told to fight the night before when something opens up.

This is very true. My first fight got canceled 4-5 times and then I got one the next evening. Fight arrangements are generally a total shit show for everyone out here lol.

 

1 hour ago, Victoria Pitt said:

I'm also going to try to get some kickboxing fights here in the US. I think its harder because of my age HERE than where I was in Thailand.  There are a lot of reasons why I didn't want to do that in the US but that way I might have some video that I would actually be interesting to put on a card.

Another option here might just be to straight up lie about your fight experience lol. Just tell them you have like 5-10 fights and go with it. That might help motivate a trainer or gym to find you a fight as it is typically a little more work for them to find someone in your weight class who is very inexperienced or brand new. I don't know if that is good or bad advice lol, but it's an idea!

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just don't go to a gym near a beach or anything too touristy that's full of of permanently hungover westerners and fancy new equipment with no Thai fighters. Those trainers are used to seeing people for 2, 3 weeks at a time and having a revolving door of fresh foreign customers. So there might be less personal care if the whole thing feels more transactional and short termist.

Go anywhere else, like a regular part of the country, stay long term, one of any of the so many random gyms with predominantly young thai fighters training and living there, and maybe a few other foreigners dotted about. Trainers care about you way more in that context, and genuinely want to see you improve and win, and are good about getting you fights.

  • Like 1
  • Cool 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Most Recent Topics

  • Latest Comments

    • Two things may have persisted through all these years. Sylvie just has always patchworked her training approach. At the time of the the first video she's taking the train down from Fort Montgomery where we lived in a little rented house next to a National Park, to train in Manhattan. We were just piecing training together because there was no real path to where she wanted to get as a fighter, no "Point A to point B, just do all the work, listen to all the right people and you'll get there" path. 11 years on we are in the exact same place. There is no point A to point B path. She's much, much further down a path of her own invention, to be sure, tinkering steps forward up a rock wall, but everything unstable that she faced 11 years ago is still right there. She's training sometimes at her old gym, sometimes alone working on self-curation, daily in sparring at another gym, privately with Yodkhunpon, and all the intermittent training in filming legends and great krus in the Library. But, from at least my perception, nothing has changed at all in this. She is not being carried by a process, or by powerful others, and in this sense is exposed. There is no safe port. And because her process involves sharing her flaws with others - unlike every other fighter I've ever seen, where it is regular to hide your flaw and amplify your best qualities - this exposure is hard to carry. The other aspect that has persisted is that because she's a true disruptor in the sport, doing things outside of the expectations and ways of others who are invested quite differently, there is a constant social current she is swimming against. In the first video she's talking about YouTube criticism, but more this is just push back against who she is. So many have come to support her over the last decade, and lent their voices & resources to make the path possible, but still there is, and may always be a detractor audience, which in part comes from the fact that she's still doing things that nobody else does. In the second vlog she's matured into her place in the sport, taken root in herself...to some small degree, but personally the same pressures of resistance press upon her. The road is no easier at this point, than it was 11 years ago. In fact in many ways its even more difficult...but, what has changed and deepened is the richness of what she has built up inside, with 268 fights and a decade of sharing her flaws with others for over a decade. She has more substance and standing and belief in what she is doing. This is what I see.
    • The above video is from almost 11 years ago. Sylvie is up the Hudson River where we lived, taking the train down to NYC to train in a Muay Thai gym in the city, more than an hour away from the small town we made our home. This video just gives me quiet tears, hearing her sincerity in response to some pretty harsh commentary coming through YouTube. One of the things Sylvie was exposed to was, from the beginning, being an outsider to "Muay Thai" proper. She was training with a 70 year old man in his basement in New Jersey, an hour and a half's drive away. She was putting up videos of her training because there was nobody like Master K, her first instructor, online anywhere. There was pretty much nothing of "Thai" Muay Thai online. A small community of interested people grew around her channel, but also came the criticism. From the beginning there was a who-do-you-think-you-are tone from many. You can hear it in her voice. She doesn't think she is anyone. She just loves Muay Thai. She's the girl who loves Muay Thai. I cry in part because many of the themes in this video are actually still operating today. She's a huge name in the sport, but personally she is really still just the girl who loves Muay Thai, who takes the alternate path, doesn't ride with gyms, doesn't care about belts, doesn't want to fight Westernized Muay Thai. She's burned a path into Thailand's Muay Thai for many, but she's just replaced Master K - who to this day loves Muay Thai as much as anyone we've ever, ever met, with the possible exception of Dieselnoi - with legends of the sport. Karuhat, Dieselnoi, Yodkhunpon, Samson, Sagat. These are her fight family. And the same quiver is in her voice when she thinks about, actually yearns for, their muay. Wanting to be a part of it, to express it. From someone on the inside, it's just striking how little of this has changed, though like a spiral it has been every climbing higher, towards more ratified and accomplished feat, many of them feats that nobody will duplicate...simply because she's just The Girl Who Loves Muay Thai, and is taking the alternate path. She's running through the foothills of Thailand's greatness. And like then, when people in Muay Thai criticized her, today she has the same. The same unbelievers. And it's as pained today as it was on this day in the video. What's remarkable about her journey is that it necessarily has involved sharing, exposing, all of her flaws to everyone. She's likely the most documented fighter in history. We've put up video of every single fight and probably a 1,000 of hours of training. She has lived herself as exposed to everyone, as much as a fighter can be. What I'm amazed by, watching this 11 years on, is her equipoise, her balance in holding the harshness of others, and her lack of ego in all that she was doing. One of the most difficult things she's encountered in developing as a fighter, reaching for the muay of yodmuay, is actually developing an ego, a pride or dignity, which is defended not only in the ring, but also in Life. How does one get from the above, to where one needs to be as a fighter? What internal transformations have to occur? I happened upon the above video today, the same day Sylvie posted a new vlog talking about her experiences in training with some IFMA team teens at her gym. She was reflecting on how many of the lessons of growth she had not been ready for as a person years ago, especially lessons about frustration and even anger. You can hear the frustration in the video at the top. Mostly it falls behind a "I mean no harm" confession. She's just loving Muay Thai and sharing it. The impulse of those shared early videos of Master K eventually became the Muay Thai Library documentary project, likely the largest, most thorough documentation archive of a fighting art in history of the world. It's the same person doing the same thing. Even to this day, nothing of this has changed. But, what has changed is the depth of her experience, in over a decade of love for the sport, and in fighting an incredible 268 fights, and counting. Take a look at the vlog she put up today, and see what has changed. From the above has come one of the most impactful western Muay Thai fighters in history, both as a person and as a fighter. And the mountain is still being climbed:    
    • What is interesting about this is that it is one of the few steps taken at the New New Lumpinee which doesn't seem like a bend toward Western (or Internationalist) ideas and instead is broadly in support of the ecosystem which has produced Thailand kaimuay Muay Thai superiority for decades. Modernist views are against children or early youth full contact fighting, but in this case Lumpinee is lending its name to younger fighters, in hopes of developing stars and their following much earlier in their lives. No matter what one thinks of child fighting in Thailand its a fundamental part of why Thais fight like no other people in the world, just in terms of skill. Interesting to see Lumpinee leaning into something there has been pushback on.
  • The Latest From Open Topics Forum

    • Two things may have persisted through all these years. Sylvie just has always patchworked her training approach. At the time of the the first video she's taking the train down from Fort Montgomery where we lived in a little rented house next to a National Park, to train in Manhattan. We were just piecing training together because there was no real path to where she wanted to get as a fighter, no "Point A to point B, just do all the work, listen to all the right people and you'll get there" path. 11 years on we are in the exact same place. There is no point A to point B path. She's much, much further down a path of her own invention, to be sure, tinkering steps forward up a rock wall, but everything unstable that she faced 11 years ago is still right there. She's training sometimes at her old gym, sometimes alone working on self-curation, daily in sparring at another gym, privately with Yodkhunpon, and all the intermittent training in filming legends and great krus in the Library. But, from at least my perception, nothing has changed at all in this. She is not being carried by a process, or by powerful others, and in this sense is exposed. There is no safe port. And because her process involves sharing her flaws with others - unlike every other fighter I've ever seen, where it is regular to hide your flaw and amplify your best qualities - this exposure is hard to carry. The other aspect that has persisted is that because she's a true disruptor in the sport, doing things outside of the expectations and ways of others who are invested quite differently, there is a constant social current she is swimming against. In the first video she's talking about YouTube criticism, but more this is just push back against who she is. So many have come to support her over the last decade, and lent their voices & resources to make the path possible, but still there is, and may always be a detractor audience, which in part comes from the fact that she's still doing things that nobody else does. In the second vlog she's matured into her place in the sport, taken root in herself...to some small degree, but personally the same pressures of resistance press upon her. The road is no easier at this point, than it was 11 years ago. In fact in many ways its even more difficult...but, what has changed and deepened is the richness of what she has built up inside, with 268 fights and a decade of sharing her flaws with others for over a decade. She has more substance and standing and belief in what she is doing. This is what I see.
    • The above video is from almost 11 years ago. Sylvie is up the Hudson River where we lived, taking the train down to NYC to train in a Muay Thai gym in the city, more than an hour away from the small town we made our home. This video just gives me quiet tears, hearing her sincerity in response to some pretty harsh commentary coming through YouTube. One of the things Sylvie was exposed to was, from the beginning, being an outsider to "Muay Thai" proper. She was training with a 70 year old man in his basement in New Jersey, an hour and a half's drive away. She was putting up videos of her training because there was nobody like Master K, her first instructor, online anywhere. There was pretty much nothing of "Thai" Muay Thai online. A small community of interested people grew around her channel, but also came the criticism. From the beginning there was a who-do-you-think-you-are tone from many. You can hear it in her voice. She doesn't think she is anyone. She just loves Muay Thai. She's the girl who loves Muay Thai. I cry in part because many of the themes in this video are actually still operating today. She's a huge name in the sport, but personally she is really still just the girl who loves Muay Thai, who takes the alternate path, doesn't ride with gyms, doesn't care about belts, doesn't want to fight Westernized Muay Thai. She's burned a path into Thailand's Muay Thai for many, but she's just replaced Master K - who to this day loves Muay Thai as much as anyone we've ever, ever met, with the possible exception of Dieselnoi - with legends of the sport. Karuhat, Dieselnoi, Yodkhunpon, Samson, Sagat. These are her fight family. And the same quiver is in her voice when she thinks about, actually yearns for, their muay. Wanting to be a part of it, to express it. From someone on the inside, it's just striking how little of this has changed, though like a spiral it has been every climbing higher, towards more ratified and accomplished feat, many of them feats that nobody will duplicate...simply because she's just The Girl Who Loves Muay Thai, and is taking the alternate path. She's running through the foothills of Thailand's greatness. And like then, when people in Muay Thai criticized her, today she has the same. The same unbelievers. And it's as pained today as it was on this day in the video. What's remarkable about her journey is that it necessarily has involved sharing, exposing, all of her flaws to everyone. She's likely the most documented fighter in history. We've put up video of every single fight and probably a 1,000 of hours of training. She has lived herself as exposed to everyone, as much as a fighter can be. What I'm amazed by, watching this 11 years on, is her equipoise, her balance in holding the harshness of others, and her lack of ego in all that she was doing. One of the most difficult things she's encountered in developing as a fighter, reaching for the muay of yodmuay, is actually developing an ego, a pride or dignity, which is defended not only in the ring, but also in Life. How does one get from the above, to where one needs to be as a fighter? What internal transformations have to occur? I happened upon the above video today, the same day Sylvie posted a new vlog talking about her experiences in training with some IFMA team teens at her gym. She was reflecting on how many of the lessons of growth she had not been ready for as a person years ago, especially lessons about frustration and even anger. You can hear the frustration in the video at the top. Mostly it falls behind a "I mean no harm" confession. She's just loving Muay Thai and sharing it. The impulse of those shared early videos of Master K eventually became the Muay Thai Library documentary project, likely the largest, most thorough documentation archive of a fighting art in history of the world. It's the same person doing the same thing. Even to this day, nothing of this has changed. But, what has changed is the depth of her experience, in over a decade of love for the sport, and in fighting an incredible 268 fights, and counting. Take a look at the vlog she put up today, and see what has changed. From the above has come one of the most impactful western Muay Thai fighters in history, both as a person and as a fighter. And the mountain is still being climbed:    
    • What is interesting about this is that it is one of the few steps taken at the New New Lumpinee which doesn't seem like a bend toward Western (or Internationalist) ideas and instead is broadly in support of the ecosystem which has produced Thailand kaimuay Muay Thai superiority for decades. Modernist views are against children or early youth full contact fighting, but in this case Lumpinee is lending its name to younger fighters, in hopes of developing stars and their following much earlier in their lives. No matter what one thinks of child fighting in Thailand its a fundamental part of why Thais fight like no other people in the world, just in terms of skill. Interesting to see Lumpinee leaning into something there has been pushback on.
    • Last week (or so) a video went "viral" on Thai social media. It was a scrappy street fight between a young kathoey (generally used for male to female Trans, but less frequently used also for female to male) protecting herself from a local, cis male bully. Nong Ping is the young Trans woman and in the video, shot by a bystander on their phone, and she absolutely goes to town on this bully. In the end the bully is standing, panting, tired, and nose dripping from his nose. After this video got so widely shared, Nong Toom - "The Beautiful Boxer," and the most famous kathoey celebrity and former Muay Thai fighter - took Nong Ping in under her wing. Nong Toom has had the young woman staying with her and has begun training her in Muay Thai, saying she already has heart and now just has to learn the skill. Nong Toom even accompanied Nong Ping on a TV show that is more or less a platform for guests to air out their grievances and settle disputes (Sia Boat and his fighter who has been charged with throwing a fight for money appeared on the show a month or so back). Nong Ping and her bully appeared on the show with the host, and Nong Toom at the table as well to educate this bully and the public. Here are some photos of Nong Ping. The first is a screenshot from the street fight, the remainder are those posted by Nong Toom as Nong Ping is a guest in her house. Nong Toom says she believes Nong Ping will have the opportunity to have a professional fight after she's been training for a bit. (As per Thailand's laws, Nong Ping will face either a cis male or another kathoey.)   For the latest Thailand Muay Thai News Updates check out our Muay Thai Bones Newsletter
    • No worries!! There are still some peeps Who'll keep stood up for it!!
  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      1.1k
    • Total Posts
      10.1k
×
×
  • Create New...