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Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu

The 123 Book - The All Time Greatest Muay Thai Fighters of Thailand

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Each photo should be enlargeable. Do consider finding a way to purchase the hard copy, if you have a way to get to the Thaismai store in Bangok.

Here are our two walk throughs. We brought some copies of the book up to Chaing Mai to be sold at Pi Boy's Thaikla shop, which sold out pretty quickly.

 

And this was a previous walk through visit:

 

 

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1 hour ago, SHELL28 said:

I emailed ThaiSmai Asking to purchase this book and they emailed straight away and can ship to Australia! 
YES! 

We've heard from different people with varying success in trying to order the book through email from them (some complaining that there was no response). But I suspect that they have improved their process over the last couple of years since we first brought this book to everyone's attention. If it arrives safely please update us so everyone can know!

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4 hours ago, Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu said:

We've heard from different people with varying success in trying to order the book through email from them (some complaining that there was no response). But I suspect that they have improved their process over the last couple of years since we first brought this book to everyone's attention. If it arrives safely please update us so everyone can know!

Will do, 

“fingers crossed”

 

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2 hours ago, Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu said:

That is awesome! Can you give the email address you worked though, how much it was, and what the payment process was?

Sure, I contacted them through their website email 

tsm@thaismai-tsm.com

They sent me bank details and price including shipping. 
I deposited the money no problem straight into their account. 
The book including shipping to Australia was just under 100 Aussie dollars which is about 2000 Thai baht. 

 

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    • Yeah fully agree with you on fighting training. On hunter gatherer, I'm not sure we should be limited to our evolutionary background. But I'm also not too informed about the subject so I don't feel confident enough to discuss. It would just be speculation/uneducated views from my side. 
    • I would never disagree with the statement that fighting can be healing and empowering, I believe it can be just as much antidote to as it can be amplifier of depressive tendencies. Your point about it being a double-edged sword seems to capture it all. Life is a fight, fighters are the artists of life par excellence, and so it follows that they will experience happiness in its fullest aspect just as much as they are at risk of depression. I do however believe that the hunt, although undoubtedly dangerous, is fundamentally different than fighting - most importantly the pack aspect, the asymmetry of hunter-prey (whereas fighting is hunter-hunter), the lack of crowd (I suppose you could argue that the crowd waits for food at home, but they are not immediate witnesses to either success or failure as in fighting) and the difference in preparation (the grueling grind of the fighter vs. the non-training of the hunter) towards the event. I'm sure we've always fought, but I blieve it was likely more a matter of manifestation of power (dominance) than application of killing efficiency, as you would see in a fight betweens animals over mating rights for example. I'm very convinced that the life of fighters is very different than the evolutionary ontology of human beings in a hunter-gather context.
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