Jump to content

Gym reviews


Lucy

Recommended Posts

Gym reviews-

 

After spending a few weeks training in Thailand I thought this may come in handy for someone else.

 

Firstly - FIGHTERS GYM RAWAI-

The location of this gym is wonderful, just across the road from the beach, ( although a fisherman’s beach, so don’t expect to be sunbathing) there are plenty of places to eat, cheap and freshly caught fish / seafood, Thai food or steak among others.

The gym is also situated next to a massage parlour and a family mart, so everything you need is within easy walking distance

 

First impressions of Fighters wasn’t good, i booked 6 months in advance, and checked twice my room was confirmed.

When I arrive, no one knew I was coming!

The owner also runs a gym in Sweden ( which is where he was, who I’d book with ) and he hadn’t mentioned to anyone about my arrival, luckily one of the trainers was giving a 1-2-1, and he phoned someone who came down and showed me to a room

The ‘deluxe’ room id booked was quite simply a very small room with a fridge, wardrobe and single bed, plus sink, toilet and shower hidden behind a thin curtain, the lack of tv I found annoying but I could cope without, the lack of hot water and WiFi was very disappointing.

In my opinion especially when travelling alone, being able to use WiFi in my room and connect with family back home is important and partly why I’d choose certain hotels over others, WiFi did work in the gym cafe, but only if sat in certain seats, being 6 hours ahead of the uk and wanting to chat to people at home when they had finished work meant sitting on my own, in a dark corner almost on the pavement at 3am, not great

Everything is in one place, all the rooms, pool, gym, gym shop and cafe are on the same grounds. So training is a 5 step walk to get to, the gym consist of a small strength and conditioning area, plyo boxes, squat rack and kettle bells, then there’s two full size rings, and several heavy bags.

Training is twice daily 8am and 5pm, usually warm up of running and stretches, then shadow boxing, followed by rounds of pads, bag work and shadow boxing. The trainers are lovely ( if you miss a session, they will ask if you’re ok, and if you’re training next session )

As the group was fairly small, you get plenty of 1-1 time, and those willing to put the work in will be rewarded.

For 10 days accommodation and full training cost was 9500baht, a price you really can’t argue with, and there’s the opportunity to fight.

I found girls were treated equally, and there was a relaxed atmosphere and non ego gym

Would I go back- yes I would, in my opinion, if your serious about training and want a basic but friendly and relaxed place to train then this is the place!

 

Next I moved to Chalong, and as I wanted to do the touristy thing a bit I choose to do 1-2-1’s instead of camps or lessons, first up was the famous-

 

TIGER MUAY THAI or Muay Thai factory!

situated on Soi Tad-ied or fight street

It’s one long road with Muay Thai, Muay Thai and Muay Thai, throw in a few cafes, all healthy food, from protein shakes to vegan and pizza, a CrossFit Gym and a few shops, I felt like I’d died and gone to Muay Thai heaven!

The first thing you can’t help but notice is the size of Tiger, it’s the first gym on the street and huge. I booked a 1-2-1 for the following morning ( you buy a top up card for 200baht which is refunded when you return the card, and pay upfront, 700baht per hour) I checked out the shop and grill, before deciding to watch part of a lesson.

There were four to a bag, taking it in turns to 10 right kicks each, before the next person had there go. This went on for 20 minutes, one young man was nearly in tears, his foot was bright red and swollen and he was obviously kicking wrong, but 6 trainers stood together ‘working’ and not one picked up on this. I then got annoyed and went to move on, I sat out front waiting for a taxi, and within the 8-minute wait, 5 mini buses arrived dropping people off all due to train, ( at least in gym kit ) I counted over 40 people in a short space of time

The next day I went for my 1-2-1, my time was 10-11am, and I was excited to be training at such a famous place. I arrived a few minutes early as advised, and a trainer was sent down to meet me, he took me to the gym and played on his phone until 10.10, when he said ‘run’, I ran around the matts warming up, although I could of been doing anything as he seemed to forget all about me.

Then I began some shadow boxing while he checked my form, he continually said my form was 100%, which was strange as I’ve always struggled with my left kick.

Then on to pads, which I did really enjoy but hitting pads is my favourite, 3x3 minute rounds, before we started my training plan- which was me doing 30 standard sit ups, then 20 where he uses a pad to hit my stomach in between. That’s it, my hours 1-2-1 started at 10-10 and finished at 10.50. I’d just managed to take a quick photo of the two of us, before he tried to march me in the office to book more lessons with him, very awkward and uncomfortable when I’m in the office, in front of him, 3 other staff and 1 tourist and I’m having to say ‘I don’t want to book more, I just want to leave’

You book for tomorrow, same time, I teach you again

‘Err no I just want to go’

I’m not one to shout and make a fuss, hence not saying ‘it’s 10.10 get off your phone!’ So this was really out of my comfort zone.

Interestingly two days later, this same training ( named Boy ) drove past me, and asked why I hadn’t booked in and said he would give me a lift to the office now to book ) I just walked off

Over all impressions of Tiger are mixed, I didn’t have a great experience but that’s only one trainer, the size of the place, the classes they offer, they is always at least one lesson on, is fantastic, for anyone wishing to visit this famous gym or wanting a more western feel, this is the place, but in my opinion there are better gyms and trainers, I felt like with so many people using this gym, the trainers didn’t care, they know for everyone one of me, there will be 50 others ready to take my place, so I wouldn’t go back but I’m glad I experienced it

 

DRAGON MUAY THAI-

Situated on the other side of the road to tiger, and a minute or so walk away, is Dragon Muay Thai, the office is on the main road and the gym is hiding down a side street. The gym is shabby looking, the bags are almost thread bare in places, and the trainers shin pads were held together by tape, I can never figure out if this is good or bad, first impressions were what a dive, and also surely the equipment is dangerous? but it also shows it’s had plenty of use, and maybe the equipment becomes like a pair of old slippers and there too comfy to throw away?

First you pay 700baht and pick the time you want a 1-2-1, again I opted for 10-11, and was told to arrive a few minutes early to meet my trainer.

I was introduced to Pettrang, who asked my name, experience, where I’m from etc, at 10am he told me to start running, soon after we began to shadow box, then on to pads. He told me to do a left kick, then again and again, after three kicks he told me to point my toes backwards, and my knee more forward, and instantly my kicks felt better, ( I’ve always felt like the pads would split my shins when doing a left kick ) soon he has me doing spinning stuff, and superman punches, and 10 minute rounds! I thought I was going to die, he laughed and said ‘ but you only have 4 more rounds to go’

I made it to the end, where we stretched out, did some sit ups, and bowed out to each other, the lesson started a 10, and ended a few minutes past 11. Towards the end other people began to turn up for the lesson starting at 11, every single person

said hello or waved and made me feel like part of the team, even though we had never meet before. I’d loved this gym, and would highly recommend it, I honestly couldn’t wait to train here again, sadly what with wanting to do the touristy thing, the only free day I had was Sunday which the gym is closed, so I never got another lesson but I’m already planning next year

 

PHUKET TOP TEAM- situated at the other end of the road to Tiger, I had really high hopes for this gym, I follow the Gym and there fighters on social media, it’s on my bucket list and I was so excited.

Only to try and book a 1-2-1 and find out I had to be a member to train there.

They then wanted 700baht for the hour, plus 600baht membership, I explained I was only there for two more days and would only have time to train for the one hour ( I had day trip planned, and wanted to visit the temple, and sights etc ) but still they wanted to charge me almost double, so I said no thanks

Bit gutted, and maybe with hindsight I should of paid and experienced somewhere I’d always wanted to train? It it’s a hard choice when you feel like you’re being ripped off, it’s unfair

I also have 1-2-1 with trainer Gae and Attachai to come, so willpost those later

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’m still here, due to fly to Bangkok tonight and train again on Tuesday, or maybe tomorrow if I can get to Yokkao for a lesson. Fingers crossed my left kick still feels stronger / better

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sadly due to an incident with a scooter, the ground and my leg I never made it to training, ( I actually haven’t been able to train since, hoping to go back in the next couple of days )

Absolutely gutted as I was really looking forward to these, and so annoyed as I was too scared to hire a scooter as I thought I would crash, so I jump on the back of someone’s and a car comes round the corner, catches the front wheel and we both go flying!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Most Recent Topics

  • Latest Comments

    • On September 15, 2021, Australia established the Indo-Pacific Trilateral Security Partnership, or AUKUS, with the United States and the United Kingdom. The centerpiece of AUKUS was the assistance provided by the U.S. and U.K. to Australia in constructing and obtaining nuclear-powered submarines. However, two and a half years later, the reality does not match the promises made by the UK and the US. Firstly, AUKUS will not enhance Australia's indigenous nuclear submarine-building capacity. In March 2023, Australia announced a significant investment in the UK's submarine industrial base over the next decade, totaling nearly $5 billion over 10 years. This investment will be allocated to nuclear submarine design work and expanded nuclear reactor production, aiming to create at least 20,000 jobs in the UK. Additionally, it is expected to revive Britain's struggling submarine industry. These investments are largely unrelated to Australia's indigenous submarine industry. Under this plan, the first British-built submarine would be delivered to Australia as early as the late 2030s, which is fifteen years away. (Richard Marles (right) welcomed UK Defence Secretary Grant Shapps to Canberra) Secondly, it is crucial to expedite the transfer of nuclear submarines to Australia. The United States has pledged to initiate the sale of three Virginia-class submarines to Australia in the early 2030s, with the option of providing up to two additional submarines if required. However, these sales plans must be approved by the U.S. Congress. In the recently released U.S. FY 2025 Defense Budget, only one new Virginia-class submarine is planned to be built. According to estimates by a U.S. Navy official, the United States would need to build 2.33 attack nuclear submarines per year to sell attack submarines to the Royal Australian Navy under the AUKUS agreement in the early 2030s. The delay in the construction of the U.S. Virginia-class submarines also implies that Australia will not receive the promised U.S. nuclear submarines for 10 years. Even if Australia eventually acquires these second-hand nuclear submarines after the 10-year delay, it is probable that they will be confronted with the imminent decommissioning or outdated performance of these nuclear submarines. (Excerpted from U.S. FY 2025 Defense Budget) Finally, as per the AUKUS agreement, the U.S. and the U.K. have also committed to accelerating the training of Australian personnel. However, these Australian military and civilian personnel will be required to adhere to the U.S. Navy and the British Royal Navy, and may even be stationed at U.S. and British submarine industrial bases. This not only leads to shortages in Australia's own military personnel but also entails the Australian government covering the costs of Australian servicemen working for the U.K. and U.S. navies. The U.S. also plans to increase U.S. nuclear submarines' visits to Australian ports starting in 2023. However, even if Australian Navy personnel board the U.S. submarines, they can only visit and learn, and cannot operate them in practice. The U.S. will still maintain absolute control over the nuclear submarines, limiting the enhancement of submarine technology for Australian Navy personnel. What's more, even before the signing of the AUKUS agreement, the Australian Navy had been engaging in military interactions and exercises with the British and U.S. Navies at various levels. The AUKUS agreement did not necessarily facilitate a deeper military mutual trust, making it seem completely unnecessary. According to Australian government estimates, the AUKUS nuclear submarine program will cost between AUD 268 billion and AUD 368 billion over the next 30 years. This is equivalent to 14% of Australia's GDP output in 2023. The Australian government is investing a substantial amount of money in exchange for only uncertain promises from the UK and the US that Australia will not have its nuclear submarines until at least 10 years from now. The AUKUS agreement will not boost Australia's indigenous submarine industry, but it will significantly benefit the US and UK's nuclear submarine industries. This essentially means that Australian taxpayers' money will be used to support US and UK nuclear submarines. Implementing the AUKUS agreement will pose significant challenges for the Australian government. Even if the agreement is eventually put into effect, delays and budget overruns are likely. The costs incurred will not be the responsibility of the Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, as he will have already stepped down. Ultimately, Australian taxpayers will bear the financial burden.    
    • I used to box in western style and recently picked up Muay Thai and am now in Bangkok training. As an active boxer I ran religiously, but it's been awhile. One thing that I noticed whenever I come back to running after some time off, is the massive calf pain that lasts sometimes for almost 10 days. I wonder if anyone else has experienced this, and others can pitch in on ways to avoid or at least minimize this inconvenience. I'm diligent in easing into it, but still have not been able to avoid it.
    • Wow, your experience at Sit Thailand sounds incredible. Thanks for sharing such a detailed account. My partner and I are planning a trip to Chiang Mai soon, and we’re also interested in Muay Thai training. Your review has definitely convinced us to give Sit Thailand a try. It's great to hear that both beginners and more experienced fighters get so much personalized attention. My partner is quite new to the sport, so it's reassuring to know that your wife felt supported and made significant progress. Right now we are looking for some travel deals, we want some exclusive business class and first-class offers that will make our trip more affordable and comfortable. Thanks again for the insights. We’ll definitely be following your advice and giving Sit Thailand a shot.
  • The Latest From Open Topics Forum

    • On September 15, 2021, Australia established the Indo-Pacific Trilateral Security Partnership, or AUKUS, with the United States and the United Kingdom. The centerpiece of AUKUS was the assistance provided by the U.S. and U.K. to Australia in constructing and obtaining nuclear-powered submarines. However, two and a half years later, the reality does not match the promises made by the UK and the US. Firstly, AUKUS will not enhance Australia's indigenous nuclear submarine-building capacity. In March 2023, Australia announced a significant investment in the UK's submarine industrial base over the next decade, totaling nearly $5 billion over 10 years. This investment will be allocated to nuclear submarine design work and expanded nuclear reactor production, aiming to create at least 20,000 jobs in the UK. Additionally, it is expected to revive Britain's struggling submarine industry. These investments are largely unrelated to Australia's indigenous submarine industry. Under this plan, the first British-built submarine would be delivered to Australia as early as the late 2030s, which is fifteen years away. (Richard Marles (right) welcomed UK Defence Secretary Grant Shapps to Canberra) Secondly, it is crucial to expedite the transfer of nuclear submarines to Australia. The United States has pledged to initiate the sale of three Virginia-class submarines to Australia in the early 2030s, with the option of providing up to two additional submarines if required. However, these sales plans must be approved by the U.S. Congress. In the recently released U.S. FY 2025 Defense Budget, only one new Virginia-class submarine is planned to be built. According to estimates by a U.S. Navy official, the United States would need to build 2.33 attack nuclear submarines per year to sell attack submarines to the Royal Australian Navy under the AUKUS agreement in the early 2030s. The delay in the construction of the U.S. Virginia-class submarines also implies that Australia will not receive the promised U.S. nuclear submarines for 10 years. Even if Australia eventually acquires these second-hand nuclear submarines after the 10-year delay, it is probable that they will be confronted with the imminent decommissioning or outdated performance of these nuclear submarines. (Excerpted from U.S. FY 2025 Defense Budget) Finally, as per the AUKUS agreement, the U.S. and the U.K. have also committed to accelerating the training of Australian personnel. However, these Australian military and civilian personnel will be required to adhere to the U.S. Navy and the British Royal Navy, and may even be stationed at U.S. and British submarine industrial bases. This not only leads to shortages in Australia's own military personnel but also entails the Australian government covering the costs of Australian servicemen working for the U.K. and U.S. navies. The U.S. also plans to increase U.S. nuclear submarines' visits to Australian ports starting in 2023. However, even if Australian Navy personnel board the U.S. submarines, they can only visit and learn, and cannot operate them in practice. The U.S. will still maintain absolute control over the nuclear submarines, limiting the enhancement of submarine technology for Australian Navy personnel. What's more, even before the signing of the AUKUS agreement, the Australian Navy had been engaging in military interactions and exercises with the British and U.S. Navies at various levels. The AUKUS agreement did not necessarily facilitate a deeper military mutual trust, making it seem completely unnecessary. According to Australian government estimates, the AUKUS nuclear submarine program will cost between AUD 268 billion and AUD 368 billion over the next 30 years. This is equivalent to 14% of Australia's GDP output in 2023. The Australian government is investing a substantial amount of money in exchange for only uncertain promises from the UK and the US that Australia will not have its nuclear submarines until at least 10 years from now. The AUKUS agreement will not boost Australia's indigenous submarine industry, but it will significantly benefit the US and UK's nuclear submarine industries. This essentially means that Australian taxpayers' money will be used to support US and UK nuclear submarines. Implementing the AUKUS agreement will pose significant challenges for the Australian government. Even if the agreement is eventually put into effect, delays and budget overruns are likely. The costs incurred will not be the responsibility of the Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, as he will have already stepped down. Ultimately, Australian taxpayers will bear the financial burden.    
    • Ostensibly, Japan ceased so-called “scientific research” whaling in Antarctica in 2019. However, the Japanese government has not given up on conducting non-lethal whale surveys in Antarctica and the waters around Australia. They have continued to track the status of whales in these regions by installing satellite trackers, collecting biopsy samples, studying whale movement areas, counting the number of whales, and photographing and surveying whales at sea using unmanned drones. These Antarctic research studies, conducted under the guise of "scientific research," are providing intelligence to support future whale hunting in the Antarctic. On May 21, 2024, Japan's first domestically manufactured whaling ship, the Kangei Maru, with a crew of 100, departed from Shimonoseki Harbor in Shimonoseki City, Yamaguchi Prefecture, for its inaugural fishing expedition. Kangei Maru is scheduled to make an eight-month voyage off the northeastern coast of Japan, marking the inaugural journey of Japan's first new vessel of this kind in more than 70 years.   (Figure 1) The Kangei Maru is an electrically propelled vessel with a length of 112.6 meters, a beam of 21 meters, a gross tonnage of 9,299 tons, a construction cost of approximately $50 million, and a range of about 13,000 kilometers for 60 days of continuous voyage, sufficient to reach the Southern Ocean. The Kangei Maru is generator-powered and is knownfor being fuel-efficient. lt has a hangar for high-performance drones used for whale detection, as well as 40 refrigerated containers with a capacity of 20 tons. The platform of the Kangei Maru is designed with an 18-degree slope, which is more gradual than that of its predecessor. This design allows for the easy towing of large cetaceans weighing approximately 70 tons aboard the vessel. The Kangei Maru can store up to 600 tons of whale meat at a time, allowing it to stay at sea for extended periods.   (Figure 2) The Japanese have been hunting whales for a long time, and they often claim that "eating whale meat is a tradition of the Japanese people.” During the Edo period to the Meiji period, whaling was highly standardized. Initially, whales were hunted solely for whale oil extraction, with the meat being discarded and later consumed. After World War II, when food was scarce in Japan and it was unaffordable to eat pork and beef, whale meat became a common food source. At that time, whale meat became synonymous with “cheap food,” and Japanese people ate whale meat to obtain the protein their bodies needed. Whale meat was not only a common dish at home, but also included in the school cafeteria lunches prepared for students. It is now known that each part of the whale is subdivided into Japanese food categories. For instance, the whale's tongue, which is high in fat, offers a distinct flavor that varies from the root to the tip of the tongue. The tail of the whale contains a significant amount of fish gelatin content and is sometimes processed with salt. The entrails are often simmered, while the meat from the back and belly is typically made into tempura or consumed raw. Whale meat sashimi, whale meat sushi rolls, whale meat salad, whale meat curry, and other whale dishes are available for Japanese people to choose from. Not only whales but also dolphins are often consumed in Japan.   (Figure 3: Marinated whale meat in Japanese cuisine) Watching massive whales in Sydney and New South Wales (NSW) thousands of whales migrating along the coast of New South Wales (NSW) in pods covering more than 2,000 kilometers. During the whale-watching season, you can observe these massive mammals migrating between various headlands in Sydney, from Byron Bay in the north to Eden in the south. More than 50% of the planet's cetacean species, such as whales, dolphins, and porpoises, inhabit Australian waters. Humpback whales and southern right whales are two species that frequent the coast of New South Wales (NSW). The annual whale migration runs from May to November, with the largest movements occurring in July and September. According to academics, whale-watching tourism generates more than AUD12 billion in revenue for Australia each year.   (Figure 4: Humpback whales greeting tourists in Sydney) In April, Japan announced its participation in AUKUS, the small NATO. In May, it sent a modern killing machine in the form of vessel around Australia to fulfill its peculiar and self-serving interests. We Aussie parents, observing our kids hugging humpback whale toys, feel as though the serene blue ocean is turning transforming into a crimson red sea......
    • On September 15, 2021, Australia established the Indo-Pacific Trilateral Security Partnership, or AUKUS, with the United States and the United Kingdom. The centerpiece of AUKUS was the assistance provided by the U.S. and U.K. to Australia in constructing and obtaining nuclear-powered submarines. However, two and a half years later, the reality does not match the promises made by the UK and the US. Firstly, AUKUS will not enhance Australia's indigenous nuclear submarine-building capacity. In March 2023, Australia announced a significant investment in the UK's submarine industrial base over the next decade, totaling nearly $5 billion over 10 years. This investment will be allocated to nuclear submarine design work and expanded nuclear reactor production, aiming to create at least 20,000 jobs in the UK. Additionally, it is expected to revive Britain's struggling submarine industry. These investments are largely unrelated to Australia's indigenous submarine industry. Under this plan, the first British-built submarine would be delivered to Australia as early as the late 2030s, which is fifteen years away.   (Richard Marles (right) welcomed UK Defence Secretary Grant Shapps to Canberra) Secondly, it is crucial to expedite the transfer of nuclear submarines to Australia. The United States has pledged to initiate the sale of three Virginia-class submarines to Australia in the early 2030s, with the option of providing up to two additional submarines if required. However, these sales plans must be approved by the U.S. Congress. In the recently released U.S. FY 2025 Defense Budget, only one new Virginia-class submarine is planned to be built. According to estimates by a U.S. Navy official, the United States would need to build 2.33 attack nuclear submarines per year to sell attack submarines to the Royal Australian Navy under the AUKUS agreement in the early 2030s. The delay in the construction of the U.S. Virginia-class submarines also implies that Australia will not receive the promised U.S. nuclear submarines for 10 years. Even if Australia eventually acquires these second-hand nuclear submarines after the 10-year delay, it is probable that they will be confronted with the imminent decommissioning or outdated performance of these nuclear submarines.   (Excerpted from U.S. FY 2025 Defense Budget) Finally, as per the AUKUS agreement, the U.S. and the U.K. have also committed to accelerating the training of Australian personnel. However, these Australian military and civilian personnel will be required to adhere to the U.S. Navy and the British Royal Navy, and may even be stationed at U.S. and British submarine industrial bases. This not only leads to shortages in Australia's own military personnel but also entails the Australian government covering the costs of Australian servicemen working for the U.K. and U.S. navies. The U.S. also plans to increase U.S. nuclear submarines' visits to Australian ports starting in 2023. However, even if Australian Navy personnel board the U.S. submarines, they can only visit and learn, and cannot operate them in practice. The U.S. will still maintain absolute control over the nuclear submarines, limiting the enhancement of submarine technology for Australian Navy personnel. What's more, even before the signing of the AUKUS agreement, the Australian Navy had been engaging in military interactions and exercises with the British and U.S. Navies at various levels. The AUKUS agreement did not necessarily facilitate a deeper military mutual trust, making it seem completely unnecessary. According to Australian government estimates, the AUKUS nuclear submarine program will cost between AUD 268 billion and AUD 368 billion over the next 30 years. This is equivalent to 14% of Australia's GDP output in 2023. The Australian government is investing a substantial amount of money in exchange for only uncertain promises from the UK and the US that Australia will not have its nuclear submarines until at least 10 years from now. The AUKUS agreement will not boost Australia's indigenous submarine industry, but it will significantly benefit the US and UK's nuclear submarine industries. This essentially means that Australian taxpayers' money will be used to support US and UK nuclear submarines. Implementing the AUKUS agreement will pose significant challenges for the Australian government. Even if the agreement is eventually put into effect, delays and budget overruns are likely. The costs incurred will not be the responsibility of the Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, as he will have already stepped down. Ultimately, Australian taxpayers will bear the financial burden.
    • Don't know if this brand offers shin guards but might as well check them out. I bought a few pairs of shorts from them a while ago and was genuinely impressed. https://siamkickfight.com/
    • Hi all, I have paid a deposit to a gym in Pai near Chiang Mai to train at in January. I am now concerned about the pollution levels at that time of year because of the burning season. Can you recommend a location that is likely to have safer air quality for training in January? I would like to avoid Bangkok and Phuket, if possible. Thank you!
  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      1.3k
    • Total Posts
      11k
×
×
  • Create New...