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Going to Thailand for the first time! Best Gym?


luckykal

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Hello!

I trained Muay Thai for 1 year long time ago followed by 6 years of boxing on a pretty high level then a long break. I wanted to start Muay Thai again and my intentions are to win the Championship belt of my country within 1.5 years! I got hired on a "Seasonal Job" which means I work 7-8 months and I am free for 4-5 months on the coldest months which allows me to travel to Thailand and train! I strongly believe in Investing Thailand trips to increase my chanses of success back home!

My first trip to Thailand this year will be for 3 months (Seems like a decent amount of time for a first-timer in Thai) I really don't care about what city, I just want as good training and development as possible, and I'm just going to Thailand to train. Train-Eat-Nap-Train-Eat-Sleep

 

What I'm looking for In a Gym:

  • Not to crowded/commertial (Like TMT)
  • A gym where I can get alot of focus from the trainers 
  • A Trainer/Trainers who are really good (Former Lumpinee/Rajadamnern champs?) and with a good/long fighting history
  • A gym where they focus on proper technique, balance etc (Some gyms are more like cardio-sessions)
  • Possibility to live at the camp (With AC)
  • Possibility to eat at the camp (Pref Package price which include Food, Accomedation and training)
  • Friendly atmosphere (Social/Encouraging/Funny trainers, friendly people and possibility to make friends)
  • Train 2 times/day + Run (Pretty standard in most gyms I know

(This is not a must, but It would be nice If the gym has a webpage where you can see package prices and book etc easier)

 

That's about It

 

Please share your thoughts and tips!

 

Cheers!

Luckykal

 

Edited by luckykal
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  • luckykal changed the title to Going to Thailand for the first time! Best Gym?

You'd have to hear from someone who has trained there recently, but an option to think about is Samart's gym in northern Bangkok. It's not going to be crowded like the most hyped gyms. It has the benefit of being run by Samart, perhaps the greatest Muay Thai fighter of all time, and a WBC World boxing champion (going with your background). I'm not sure how much Samart does in the training, but his brother Kongtoraneee was perhaps an even more accomplished MT fighter, and also fought for a WBC boxing championship is there. So you have a proper fusion of boxing and Muay Thai. Again, you would have to hear from someone who has trained there recently, gyms change all the time. It's kind of an off-the-circuit, but still reputable gym.

https://web.facebook.com/samartpayakaroongym

 

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Hello mate and thank you for your input!

I checked em out earlier, it's aliiiiitle to expensive for me sadly 150000 BAHT for AC accomodation + Training for 3 months. I know you could probably knock the price down ALOT by going to a cheap hotel nearby instead, i'll have to think about It. 

I would love someones input on these gyms, I had like 15 gyms on my radar from scouting on 8limbsus, Reddit & Youtube, and I have checked prices, quailty of training, schedules, vibe of the gym on youtube etc etc. And so far I have narrowed it down to this:

(Most interested from top to bottom)

  • sitsongpeenong (My favorite so far. Seems to be VERY high level, home of Sittichai who trains there often and atmosphere seems super friendly, also I like their schedule alot. Seems to be a good mix of Farangs & Thais so English is sufficient)
  • Sitjaopho (Found this yesterday, no website but I talked with them alittle on FB and awaitng answers on prices and accomodation options etc) Brothers seem to LOVE to teach proper Muay Thai, English is very good for Thai, good mix between Farangs/Thai, High Level, Good Schedule and they seem to put alot of emphasis on teaching proper technique [Edit] This is actually split first place with sitsongpeenong, as a Swede I heard they often have many Swedes there, also atmosphere seems 10/10
  • singpatong-sitnumnoi (Seems very hardcore, i think i would grow alot here)
  • Santai (Heard alot of positive reviews, but somehow feels alittle to amateur-like?)
  • Khunsuek (Seems nice, Superbons gym but feels alittle to commertial for my taste, also what I heard its more of cardio sessions rather than technique 
  • Attachai (Waiting for their website to come online, just says "coming soon"

 

That's what I got so far.

 

Edited by luckykal
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On 1/24/2023 at 7:22 AM, Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu said:

You'd have to hear from someone who has trained there recently, but an option to think about is Samart's gym in northern Bangkok. It's not going to be crowded like the most hyped gyms. It has the benefit of being run by Samart, perhaps the greatest Muay Thai fighter of all time, and a WBC World boxing champion (going with your background). I'm not sure how much Samart does in the training, but his brother Kongtoraneee was perhaps an even more accomplished MT fighter, and also fought for a WBC boxing championship is there. So you have a proper fusion of boxing and Muay Thai. Again, you would have to hear from someone who has trained there recently, gyms change all the time. It's kind of an off-the-circuit, but still reputable gym.

https://web.facebook.com/samartpayakaroongym

 

Tbh I was set for Manop gym, but after doing some more reasarch and talking with the kind people on Samart gym I decided to go for Samart. Boxing is quite a weak like in many muay thai gyms and I really think that as you said it would benefit me the most due to a good blend. Muay Femur + Boxing. 

I've looked at some people training there and they all seem very friendly. Only concern I have, how Is his and his brothers English? Is it enough to understand correction of technique, pads etc?

  • Nak Muay 1
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I don't really remember their English because Sylvie spoke to them in Thai. I believe Kongtoranee though was a trainer in Singapore for some time, which usually means workable English. Cool that you did research and you feel good about it. Let us know how it turns out.

 

Also, if you are there for a while consider taking a private with Chatchai Sasakul whose gym is not that far (a taxi ride). Former WBC boxing champion and one of the best boxing coaches in all of Thailand. There is tons of his stuff in the Muay Thai Library:

 

 

 

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On 1/27/2023 at 1:26 PM, luckykal said:

Tbh I was set for Manop gym, but after doing some more reasarch and talking with the kind people on Samart gym I decided to go for Samart. Boxing is quite a weak like in many muay thai gyms and I really think that as you said it would benefit me the most due to a good blend. Muay Femur + Boxing. 

I've looked at some people training there and they all seem very friendly. Only concern I have, how Is his and his brothers English? Is it enough to understand correction of technique, pads etc?

Some of my Finnish muay thai trainers go to Kongtoranee's gym on a regular basis, and my guess is that the English used is understandable. They've got a facebook page (Kongtoranee Muaythai by Twins Finland) but there's no info on prices etc. 

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  • 2 months later...

A friend has recently been training at Khao Lak Muay Thai and says its a really fun and vibrant atmosphere but serious enough for intermediate/advanced students. No egos or steroid-heads. I had a look at the website and seems to tick all your boxes. He also said Khao Lak is a much better environment for training than Phuket or elsewhere without the usual distractions 

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