Jump to content

Lisa Creech Bledsoe's 9 Reasons to Start Boxing After 40


Recommended Posts

This is the original post from 2010. Putting the content here because it is awesome. Her blog The Glowing Edge

9 Reasons to Start Boxing After 40
 
1. Street cred

Think about the difference between saying, “Yeah, I play a little basketball,” versus “The stitches don’t bother me. I have another fight next month; you should come.” C’mon, it’s just cool. And when was the last time you had legitimate Cool Points, when you downloaded the Zippo lighter app to your iPhone? Puh-leeze.

2. Business smarts

If there is one thing you must do to thrive in the ring, it’s develop the ability to think clearly under massive pressure. That translates really nicely to the business world. Mergers and acquisition? Hostile takeovers? High finance? Forty-seven third graders? Bring it.

3. Get your mind off of work

Forget business smarts, if you’ve been racing your career motorcycle this long, you might want to ease up on that throttle and get off the bike now and then. It feels great to unsuit and pound the crap out of something. And taking a few good hits will definitely clear out the last of your desire to work 24/7, I promise.

4. Increase your bone density

Ok, you’re over 40 and it’s time to lay off the loaded potato skins at T.G.I. Friday’s and get under that bench press bar. Your bones aren’t going to get stronger unless you bring them some game, and weightlifting — a boxer’s primary tool for building muscle — is just the way to do it.

5. Muscle is sexy

All that weightlifting and other training is going to pay off in terms of the way your body looks, feels, and delivers. You’ll like what you see in the mirror, and so will whoever’s looking at you when you step out of the shower. Hubba hubba.

6. Me time

It wasn’t so long ago that you couldn’t take your eyes off the kids for a second or they’d eat all the buds of the neighbor’s peonies and you’d be on the phone with Poison Control. These days, they’re a little older and you only have to worry about paying the extra car insurance, who they’re dating, whether they’re texting and driving, and… whoops, sorry about that. My point was going to be that you can get away some nights and have “me time” without them. Boxing fits the bill.

7. Mentor someone

Ok, if you just don’t get enough with the kids, you’ll find some at the gym. They will be faster and have a higher punch count and they will bring a serious press to you in the ring, but you’ll be able to outlast and out think them. And you have the maturity to see a much bigger picture than they do. Why not be a good influence and also kick their butts (in the later rounds) too? Now that’s what I call a satisfying mentoring relationship.

8. Get out of your comfort zone

Let’s face it, you’ve been trying to find a place of comfort and ease for years. Stop that, it’s not good for you. Get off your butt and out of your rut and learn something new. Growing means risks, and boxing has just the right balance of risk and safety to give you a jolt and still send you home in one piece. Mostly one piece.

9. Eat better

Believe me, you are not going to work hard enough to go a few rounds and then sabotage yourself with crap eating. If you take to boxing, you’re going to want to support it every way you can, and that will spur you to make positive changes to the way you fuel your body. You’re sick of sports bar food anyway. This is gonna be purely delicious.

There’s never been a better time than now.

- See more at: http://www.theglowingedge.com/9-reasons-to-start-boxing-after-40/#sthash.pmKrBm92.dpuf
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do like all these reasons to train over 40.  I also really appreciated the "Muscle Power" post on 8 limbs.  The fight between Aurora and Gerry was almost unwatchable though - I hate seeing that kind of height/power/skill and age differential.  Very glad to read that Gerry got back at it and did much better.  Cannot believe she is that old.  Any time you mention age or someone being old and fighting I appreciate it.   Part of me also is embarrassed though.  My trainer posted a video of some padwork with a 58 year old and everyone was very appreciative in the comments (or a few people were anyway).  For me I appreciate it but I also kept thinking 'jesus he's slow. aw come on pick it up... standup for the old folks.. oh no he's wobbly too'.  So its bittersweet.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I still have a few months left of being in my sweet 20s, so being over 40 is kinda like a lifetime away in my perspective. I really do hope that I will be as active as I can when the time comes (and slimmer!!! ;( ;(). 

I feel as if all the 40+ can relate to these reasons, I see a lot of women joining gyms and fitness classes at that age and I think it's totally admirable.

I do like all these reasons to train over 40.  I also really appreciated the "Muscle Power" post on 8 limbs.  The fight between Aurora and Gerry was almost unwatchable though - I hate seeing that kind of height/power/skill and age differential.  Very glad to read that Gerry got back at it and did much better.  Cannot believe she is that old.  Any time you mention age or someone being old and fighting I appreciate it.   Part of me also is embarrassed though.  My trainer posted a video of some padwork with a 58 year old and everyone was very appreciative in the comments (or a few people were anyway).  For me I appreciate it but I also kept thinking 'jesus he's slow. aw come on pick it up... standup for the old folks.. oh no he's wobbly too'.  So its bittersweet.  

I see why it can be bittersweet to you, but let's face it, noone is going to be in their prime form forever. You have to adjust your training to your health conditions, just like you adjust to -let's say - weahter conditions :) Let's congratulate this 58yo for the courage to come to the gym and train with younlings ;)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I'm 43 and just celebrated my one year anniversary of finding, and training, Muay Thai. I train at least 5 times per week at night, work full-time, have 2 small children. I started due to bulging discs in my back and I also have several 'invisible' illnesses. I run before every session approx. 4-7kms.

I have experienced incredible change and growth in that time. I have learned so much about myself and coped with many difficult times as a direct result of the inner strength I have gained from Muay Thai, my amazing trainer and my gym family. Muay Thai is the hardest, yet best, thing I've ever done. It has taught me to stop making excuses. No matter what, I train. It's not easy, I'm not 'special', I have bad days, I have good days.

I don't feel 43. Sometimes I'm horrified when I think about it!

I hope to fight next year at some point. Apparently that's not such an easy thing to arrange at my age. I'm keeping positive that I'll get to experience it - in an authentic and challenging way.

I'm inspired daily by Sylvie and other women and men in Muay Thai. I know it's a learning curve with no end for me.

A lifelong passion.

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm 43 and just celebrated my one year anniversary of finding, and training, Muay Thai. I train at least 5 times per week at night, work full-time, have 2 small children. I started due to bulging discs in my back and I also have several 'invisible' illnesses. I run before every session approx. 4-7kms.

I have experienced incredible change and growth in that time. I have learned so much about myself and coped with many difficult times as a direct result of the inner strength I have gained from Muay Thai, my amazing trainer and my gym family. Muay Thai is the hardest, yet best, thing I've ever done. It has taught me to stop making excuses. No matter what, I train. It's not easy, I'm not 'special', I have bad days, I have good days.

I don't feel 43. Sometimes I'm horrified when I think about it!

I hope to fight next year at some point. Apparently that's not such an easy thing to arrange at my age. I'm keeping positive that I'll get to experience it - in an authentic and challenging way.

I'm inspired daily by Sylvie and other women and men in Muay Thai. I know it's a learning curve with no end for me.

A lifelong passion.

I've been very impressed by how many women I've come in contact with who are in their late-30's and mid-40's, who are very devoted and dedicated to Muay Thai. I'm certainly made to feel older than I actually feel by living in the Thai world of Muay Thai, which skews toward adolescents. But, while I don't consider 31 to be "old," it's not exactly categorized by "young" either. But even at my age, perhaps by the circumstances of living here, I see a lot of truth in that saying, "youth is wasted on the young." I'm much more focused and work much more deliberately than the young'ins at my gym. But I don't think I would have been ready for this kind of experience earlier in my life. I was an idiot in my late-teens; I needed to be the age I was when I started and I've needed the years I've spent in the sport/art already to get to the point I'm at now. There are so many times I have a realization about a technique or ethic that I was instructed a LONG time ago but it only makes sense to me now. I'm only ready for it now.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Most Recent Topics

  • Latest Comments

    • Here is a 6 minute audio wherein a I phrase the argument speaking in terms of Thailand's Muay Femeu and Spinoza's Ethics.    
    • Leaving aside the literary for a moment, the relationship between "techniques" and style (& signature) is a meaningful one to explore, especially for the non-Thai who admires the sport and wishes to achieve proficiency, or even mastery. Mostly for pedagogic reasons (that is, acute differences in training methods, along with a culture & subjectivity of training, a sociological thread), the West and parts of Asia tend to focus on "technical" knowledge, often with a biomechanical emphasis. A great deal of emphasis is put on learning to some precision the shape of the Thai kick or its elbow, it's various executions, in part because visually so much of Thailand's Muay Thai has appeared so visually clean (see: Precision – A Basic Motivation Mistake in Some Western Training). Because much of the visual inspiration for foreign learned techniques often come from quite elevated examples of style and signature, the biomechanical emphasis enters just on the wrong level. The techniques displayed are already matured and expressed in stylistics. (It would be like trying to learn Latin or French word influences as found in Nabakov's English texts.) In the real of stylistics, timing & tempo, indeed musicality are the main drivers of efficacy. Instead, Thais learn much more foundational techniques - with far greater variance, and much less "correction" - principally organized around being at ease, tamachat, natural. The techne (τέχνη), the mechanics, that ground stylistics, are quite basic, and are only developmentally deployed in the service of style (& signature), as it serves to perform dominance in fights. The advanced, expressive nature of Thai technique is already woven into the time and tempo of stylistics. This is one reason why the Muay Thai Library project involves hour long, unedited training documentation, so that the style itself is made evident - something that can even have roots in a fighter's personality and disposition. These techne are already within a poiesis (ποίησις), a making, a becoming. Key to unlocking these basic forms is the priority of balance and ease (not biomechanical imitations of the delivery of forces), because balance and ease allow their creative use in stylistics.
    • To help in greater theoretical discussion, The Magician's Doubt's parsing of signature from style. In my discussion above the uses of a fighter's style perhaps would be best understood as a blending of both Michael Wood's "style" and "signature" below:
  • The Latest From Open Topics Forum

    • Hi, this might be out of the normal topic, but I thought you all might be interested in a book-- Children of the Neon Bamboo-- that has a really cool Martial Arts instructor character who set up an early Muy Thai gym south of Miami in the 1980s. He's a really cool character who drives the plot, and there historically accurate allusions to 1980s martial arts culture. However, the main thrust is more about nostalgia and friendships.    Can we do links? Childrenoftheneonbamboo.com Children of the Neon Bamboo: B. Glynn Kimmey: 9798988054115: Amazon.com: Movies & TV      
    • Davince Resolve is a great place to start. 
    • I see that this thread is from three years ago, and I hope your journey with Muay Thai and mental health has evolved positively during this time. It's fascinating to revisit these discussions and reflect on how our understanding of such topics can grow. The connection between training and mental health is intricate, as you've pointed out. Finding the right balance between pushing yourself and self-care is a continuous learning process. If you've been exploring various avenues for managing mood-related issues over these years, you might want to revisit the topic of mental health resources. One such resource is The UK Medical Cannabis Card, which can provide insights into alternative treatments.
    • Phetjeeja fought Anissa Meksen for a ONE FC interim atomweight kickboxing title 12/22/2023. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cu92S6-V5y0&ab_channel=ONEChampionship Fight starts at 45:08 Phetjeeja won on points. Not being able to clinch really handicapped her. I was afraid the ref was going to start deducting points for clinch fouls.   
    • Earlier this year I wrote a couple of sociology essays that dealt directly with Muay Thai, drawing on Sylvie's journalism and discussions on the podcast to do so. I thought I'd put them up here in case they were of any interest, rather than locking them away with the intention to perfectly rewrite them 'some day'. There's not really many novel insights of my own, rather it's more just pulling together existing literature with some of the von Duuglus-Ittu's work, which I think is criminally underutilised in academic discussions of MT. The first, 'Some meanings of muay' was written for an ideology/sosciology of knowledge paper, and is an overly long, somewhat grindy attempt to give a combined historical, institutional, and situated study of major cultural meanings of Muay Thai as a form of strength. The second paper, 'the fighter's heart' was written for a qualitative analysis course, and makes extensive use of interviews and podcast discussions to talk about some ways in which the gendered/sexed body is described/deployed within Muay Thai. There's plenty of issues with both, and they're not what I'd write today, and I'm learning to realise that's fine! some meanings of muay.docx The fighter's heart.docx
  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      1.3k
    • Total Posts
      11k
×
×
  • Create New...