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CatherineS

Muay Thai tattoos that aren’t Sak Yant?

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I want to get a Muay Thai tattoo because it changed who I am as a person, my world perspective, yadda, yadda. The thing is, I’m not “legit” enough for a Sak Yant. I haven’t trained in Thailand, am not closely tied to Thai culture outside of Muay Thai, don’t consider myself a Buddhist, and would definitely feel like a bit of a fraud getting one. I *do not* look at other people in a similar position the same way so this isn’t a criticism of anyone in a similar situation who has gotten one.

The question is, are there any Muay Thai tattoos that aren’t Sak Yant that are not completely hokey or ridiculous? Or is this just best left alone and the idea scrapped entirely? Is it disrespectful to the tradition of the sport and would only serve to Westernize something not really meant for westerners outside of training?

I’m not looking for an answer I want to hear on some of the cultural questions. Seriously seeking some thoughtful considerations. 

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Hi 🙂 

SakYants Aren’t just for Muay Thai fighters, lots of people who aren’t fighters have Sak yants.

It’s a tradition too that is based on animalism and Magic so it not just Buddhism:) 
 

But if Sak Yants don’t resonate how about  finding a symbol that represents what Muay Thai means.... 

Like does training MT bring freedom? Maybe freedom written in Thai? Or something like that. 

I hope I’ve helped lol 

 

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Tattoos are quite personal, so whatever brings you association to your experiences with Muay Thai is appropriate. You could chose a word written in Thai, or an image (the things to consider here are if you get a mongkol, for example, placement has to be high on your body).

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On 6/22/2020 at 1:04 AM, Sylvie von Duuglas-Ittu said:

Tattoos are quite personal, so whatever brings you association to your experiences with Muay Thai is appropriate. You could chose a word written in Thai, or an image (the things to consider here are if you get a mongkol, for example, placement has to be high on your body).

Thank you! That is good starting point for picking a design. 

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On 6/16/2020 at 2:06 AM, SHELL28 said:

Hi 🙂 

SakYants Aren’t just for Muay Thai fighters, lots of people who aren’t fighters have Sak yants.

It’s a tradition too that is based on animalism and Magic so it not just Buddhism:) 
 

But if Sak Yants don’t resonate how about  finding a symbol that represents what Muay Thai means.... 

Like does training MT bring freedom? Maybe freedom written in Thai? Or something like that. 

I hope I’ve helped lol 

 

Thank you! More good info. I thought about the word in Thai thing but soooo much could go wrong there. Kinda like the Chinese symbols that people got in the 90s and 2000s that are supposed to say freedom but actually translate to chicken diarrhea or some such ridiculousness. I sure don’t want to be that asshole. 🤣

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On 6/15/2020 at 11:21 PM, CatherineS said:

Seriously seeking some thoughtful considerations. 

As others have mentioned, sak yant aren't really "for" Muay Thai. In fact they are seldom prominent in most prominent Thai Muay Thai fighters. They are kind of from the under-class of Thailand, much as perhaps tattoos in general were in western countries for a very long time. And, some of that under class become fighters. But...mostly they are just symbolic representations of protection, or power, believed in an an animistic level. A sak yant of a tiger may just be summoning up "tiger energy", the ability to command, stalking forcefulness, etc. It could apply to anything in life.

So...sak yant could just tap into or express the underfeelings of what Muay Thai has brought to you, without being some sort of "bro" appropriation. Your own attempt to get in touch with that thing, that meaningfulness. Or, maybe not.

In either case, I would say to just get in touch with that thing that Muay Thai has done for you, brought to you, and then find some representation that speaks to that for you. Maybe its nothing that looks like its related to Muay Thai at all...but YOU know it's about Muay Thai. Or, perhaps, if there is a particular heroic fighter who inspires you, then perhaps something related to their image.

As for words, Sylvie's discussed a series of Thai words that embody the spirit of Muay Thai, I'm sure she would double check the graphic for you before you got it tattoo'd. This was one: Ning:

1115080572_NingMuayThai.jpg.23667ef72aea964685b08d1af42d5eac.jpg

 

https://web.facebook.com/sylviemuaythai/photos/a.134623809905091/2636651226368991

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On 6/25/2020 at 11:34 PM, Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu said:

As others have mentioned, sak yant aren't really "for" Muay Thai. In fact they are seldom prominent in most prominent Thai Muay Thai fighters. They are kind of from the under-class of Thailand, much as perhaps tattoos in general were in western countries for a very long time. And, some of that under class become fighters. But...mostly they are just symbolic representations of protection, or power, believed in an an animistic level. A sak yant of a tiger may just be summoning up "tiger energy", the ability to command, stalking forcefulness, etc. It could apply to anything in life.

So...sak yant could just tap into or express the underfeelings of what Muay Thai has brought to you, without being some sort of "bro" appropriation. Your own attempt to get in touch with that thing, that meaningfulness. Or, maybe not.

In either case, I would say to just get in touch with that thing that Muay Thai has done for you, brought to you, and then find some representation that speaks to that for you. Maybe its nothing that looks like its related to Muay Thai at all...but YOU know it's about Muay Thai. Or, perhaps, if there is a particular heroic fighter who inspires you, then perhaps something related to their image.

As for words, Sylvie's discussed a series of Thai words that embody the spirit of Muay Thai, I'm sure she would double check the graphic for you before you got it tattoo'd. This was one: Ning:

1115080572_NingMuayThai.jpg.23667ef72aea964685b08d1af42d5eac.jpg

 

https://web.facebook.com/sylviemuaythai/photos/a.134623809905091/2636651226368991

Thank you! This is quite helpful for finding a place to start. Tattoos are permanent and I’m old enough to know that you do NOT want something permanently on your body if you aren’t 100% sure about it and of course I don’t want to be a disrespectful appropriating asshole. 
 

I appreciate you spending the time to clarify these things and providing some great insight. 

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