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1500 bt/Day 2training,2meals, accomodation and wifi. Is it expensive?


Daniele

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1500 bath / day for a muay thai camp with 2 training 2 meals accomodation and wifi, is it expensive?

Kiatpontip gym gives all these for 1000 bath/Day, is kiatpontip very honest? or 1500 bath/Day very expensive?

Thx

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I'm with NewThai...

To get a grasp if it's expensive I would check how much I'd have to pay if I didn't pay as a "bundle", but each of the composites.

So if you pay 3000Baht/week of training - it's basically 428baht/day. Next up, housing. How much do you pay for a week of housing in the same conditions? ...and so on.

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  • 3 weeks later...

What is expensive for one person, may be cheap to another. 

Though, I would be wary of buying a package like this, the reason being is usually you don't choose what food you can eat, so if you wanna eat fried rice, they might give you noodles. Depending where you are living a meal can be from 20-50b so if you're going higher 150/day.

Room, you can get a condo (nice big space) for about 7000b a month, again depends on where you are living. 233/day

Usually Muay Thai training is around 10000 a month for 2x/day. 333/day

So for the package you wanted you could spend 716/day if you did it yourself. There are also a lot of other costs that I didn't add on, simply because your question was about room/training/food.

 

Hope it helped.

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