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Kanongsuk Muay Thai (Chiang Rai)


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Fair warning: I have not trained here myself. In fact he just opened his own gym this Monday past, but as a small business owner I am always happy to help spread the word for a friend about theirs.

 

Www.Kanongsukmuaythai.com

 

If you Google "Kanongsuk Chuwattana" you can find not only his fight videos, but some of his training videos from his time with Evolve in Singapore. He is also super active with his gym page on Facebook with some video tours of the gym and info on the nearby hotels.

 

This gym is in Chiang Rai within walking distance of local hotels. If you're headed to Thailand please consider Kru Chay and his new facility. Thanks!

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  • 5 months later...

I'm training since begin may at Kanongsuk Muay Thai Gym. It is a brand new fully-equipped gym, so you don't need to bring your own gloves/wraps unless you prefer your own stuff like i do.

I went in may to Chiang Rai to learn meditation at a jungle forest, a friend at the gym in Bangkok told me about Cru Chai just opened a gym in Chiang Rai.  She has trained with him at Elvolve MMA in Singapore. Of course I had to check out Kanongsuk Muay Thai Gym and train with a 3x Lumpinee Champion and 1x Maxx Muay Thai Champion. What is the chance that you can train with an elite muay thai fighter? Sure, in Singapore at Elvolve MMA you can find all the Lumpinee and Rajadamnern champions in one gym but don't forget to bring your credit card with you!

It's a small gym but has everything you need. It's located 5 km out of the center, you need a motorbike or bicycle to get there. At my first day I met Cru Chai and his little brother Som. Both speak very good English, so don't be scared if you don't speak Thai! I haven't trained for weeks so I asked cru Chai to take it easy with me. My first training went great. After a good warm up and stretching we started with the pads. You can tell right away that your are training with a champion. He pays alot attention to technique, details. After doing the pads we did more exercises with the bags, all the time he was there to guide you and he does that every traning! Where can you have a 1,5 hour traning with a 3xLumpinee champion for only 400 Bath??? 20 sessions for 6800 Bath?? Not only is he a great fighter and teacher but he is also a very nice humble person.

After training with cru Chai for 2 weeks  I had decided to move from Bangkok to Chiang Rai to train with him. He is so good and Chiang Rai is a great and relax place to focus on doing Muay Thai. I am not training to get ready for a fight, i just like doing Muay Thai. Most of his students are Thai, they train here for fun or trying to get fit. There are also some 'Farangs' training here to get ready for a fight. Coming saturday cru Chai has arranged a fight in Chiang Mai for Nick, American dude. He still has a lot contact with promotors he knows from his career, so it's easy for him to get a fight for you.

3,5 months later and I still have no regrets of moving to Chiang rai to train with cru Chai. Like my old gym in Bangkok they treat me like family. We train together, eat and drink together, sometimes we go to massages together. Life is good in Chiang Rai and cheap too.

If you planning to come to Thailand for learning Muay Thai, Kanongsuk Muay Thai Gym is a fantastic opportunity to learn from the best, learn from an elite Muay Thai fighter.

Cheers,

Kong

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  • 3 weeks later...

:woot:  :thanks:

Heading to Chiang Rai in 2 or 3 months and was wondering how the Muay Thai situation would be...

This is an absolute score of knowledge!! Thanks, New Thai & Kong.

400 baht for Lumphini champ level instruction??? #mindblown

I was paying 900 in Chiang Mai to work with Gen Hongthong (probably my favorite trainer so far in terms of fight IQ and his sheer joy of teaching).

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  • 1 month later...

***and now that I've trained there***

 

Kanongsuk Muay Thai Gym is a newly opened gym way up north in the quiet province of Chiang Rai. The short review: Kru Chai is worth the trip.

 

Kanongsuk Muay Thai is a small, humble gym much like the area it's located - but size isn't everything. Kru Chai has a multitude of fighting accolades in several countries, mirrored by many years of training others to fight. His fight IQ is high, his English skills are quite good, and with both he is able to take your current skills and hone both your technique and overall fight game. He also has many connections in the industry, so if you want to fight he will get you booked no problem. Whatever your current level of skill, Kru Chai will make you a better fighter.

 

Conversely, if you are not a fighter and only looking to have fun and get fit while visiting, he won't kill you in overly grueling sessions - just tell him what your goals are and he will set a training plan for you.

 

Most of you have probably never heard of Chiang Rai before reading into this gym. It's a one hour flight from Bangkok, and the airport is about 15-20 minutes from downtown. You can walk to the gym from the hotel. It's not hard to get there at all!

 

Life in Chiang Rai is slow-paced, so you'll have plenty of time to stop and soak in the beauty and culture around you. Chiang Rai is nestled between the mountains with sprawling fields of rice, tea, coffee, pineapple: agriculture is an industry here. You will also find a multitude of temples, some small with large histories, some new that are simply breathtaking. There are open-air markets and night markets same as the larger cities. If you're not inclined to rent a motorbike then you can call a cab with the GrabTaxi app to get around town with ease.

 

If you are looking to visit Thailand and are brave enough to venture outside of the more touristy areas, you won't be disappointed. Contact Kru Chai through email, text, IG, or FB: he is very active on all forums.

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