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Sasiprapa, Kiatphontip, Petchrungruang, Keatkhamtorn - Reviews Needed

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Hello all,

Currently planning my 2nd trip to Thailand, would be going for 1 month this December. Looking for personal experiences these gyms:

- Kiatphontip

- Sasiprapa 

- Petchrungruang 

- Keatkhamtorn 

The more recent the experience the better of course. Just a quick overview of the trainers, the level of people training there, general atmosphere, english level, distractions, etc. Was it like they had told you? Did you just smash pads and were let to yourself for the rest? Were you given tips during bag work/shadow boxing? Was it more technical or more cardio-intensive? Pros and cons...

I contacted them on Facebook and speaking with some already at the moment regarding pricing,  accommodation, airport pickup/drop-off and other services... So yah really looking for some personal inputs from anybody having spent time at any of these gyms. Please also mention the year at which you attended the gym(s).

Thanks

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On 11/15/2019 at 5:29 PM, KushGod said:

Hello all,

Currently planning my 2nd trip to Thailand, would be going for 1 month this December. Looking for personal experiences these gyms:

- Kiatphontip

- Sasiprapa 

- Petchrungruang 

- Keatkhamtorn 

The more recent the experience the better of course. Just a quick overview of the trainers, the level of people training there, general atmosphere, english level, distractions, etc. Was it like they had told you? Did you just smash pads and were let to yourself for the rest? Were you given tips during bag work/shadow boxing? Was it more technical or more cardio-intensive? Pros and cons...

I contacted them on Facebook and speaking with some already at the moment regarding pricing,  accommodation, airport pickup/drop-off and other services... So yah really looking for some personal inputs from anybody having spent time at any of these gyms. Please also mention the year at which you attended the gym(s).

Thanks

I can speak to Petchrungruang from personal experience:

You get 3 rounds on the pads, 4 minutes each with 1 minute rest in between rounds. Our trainers are all pretty different from each other, some are more instructive than others, but if you prefer more instruction you can always ask. When you're not on the pads, you're largely responsible for your own work. Shadow, bagwork and conditioning are on you; you will be called in and matched up for sparring and clinching. Clinching is every day, sparring is every-other day but if you want sparring just ask for a partner or find someone you want to work with. Mornings are more quiet, generally, but it's been pretty busy in November and I expect it will stay that way through December. Mornings are a run at 5AM and then you can do your own work directly after, or you can come back at 9AM and have pads and work with everyone who comes at that time. We do a bit of "group" drills and conditioning in the morning, like groups of 3 doing 100 kicks on the bag or whatever, but in the afternoon it's less structured.

Not all of our trainers speak English, but some speak it quite well. Communication is still pretty good with those who don't speak English, they can explain technique physically and generally pinpoint what the problem is without a lot of verbal necessities.

Thais and westerners all train together, there's no separation in the work we do. You'll be matched in clinch and sparring based on your size and level, so that might be with a Thai or might be with another westerner. It's a family-style gym, not fussy, not fancy, but we have good equipment and it's clean. Pattaya is a mixed bag. There are distractions if you go looking for them, but it's easy enough to avoid them. There is no on-sight accommodation, but you can find your own or go with the training/accommodation package at http://royalthairesidencepattaya.com/muay-thai , which is a 15 minute walk or 5 minute motorbike ride.

I love this gym. It's my home, it's my heart. But it's not for everyone and I don't universally recommend it. If you need a lot of structure, not for you. If you work hard and listen, you'll be okay.

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7 hours ago, Sylvie von Duuglas-Ittu said:

I can speak to Petchrungruang from personal experience:

You get 3 rounds on the pads, 4 minutes each with 1 minute rest in between rounds. Our trainers are all pretty different from each other, some are more instructive than others, but if you prefer more instruction you can always ask. When you're not on the pads, you're largely responsible for your own work. Shadow, bagwork and conditioning are on you; you will be called in and matched up for sparring and clinching. Clinching is every day, sparring is every-other day but if you want sparring just ask for a partner or find someone you want to work with. Mornings are more quiet, generally, but it's been pretty busy in November and I expect it will stay that way through December. Mornings are a run at 5AM and then you can do your own work directly after, or you can come back at 9AM and have pads and work with everyone who comes at that time. We do a bit of "group" drills and conditioning in the morning, like groups of 3 doing 100 kicks on the bag or whatever, but in the afternoon it's less structured.

Not all of our trainers speak English, but some speak it quite well. Communication is still pretty good with those who don't speak English, they can explain technique physically and generally pinpoint what the problem is without a lot of verbal necessities.

Thais and westerners all train together, there's no separation in the work we do. You'll be matched in clinch and sparring based on your size and level, so that might be with a Thai or might be with another westerner. It's a family-style gym, not fussy, not fancy, but we have good equipment and it's clean. Pattaya is a mixed bag. There are distractions if you go looking for them, but it's easy enough to avoid them. There is no on-sight accommodation, but you can find your own or go with the training/accommodation package at http://royalthairesidencepattaya.com/muay-thai , which is a 15 minute walk or 5 minute motorbike ride.

I love this gym. It's my home, it's my heart. But it's not for everyone and I don't universally recommend it. If you need a lot of structure, not for you. If you work hard and listen, you'll be okay.

Perfect thanks a lot for the input Sylvie! Exactly the kind of experience sharing I am looking for, very detailed and informative of what to expect there.

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