Incredible Throw Counter of the Teep – Slow Motion Karuhat

Karuhat is so awesome. Everything he does is slick and confident, maybe a little (a lot) cocky, but just awesome. I’ll be writing more about this move when the 1...

Karuhat is so awesome. Everything he does is slick and confident, maybe a little (a lot) cocky, but just awesome. I’ll be writing more about this move when the 1 hour private for Nak Muay Nation comes out at the start of August, but here’s a “sneak peak,” of sorts. Karuhat rolled this out as a surprise when we were teach-sparring together; it must have been a nightmare to fight him, but in this context I was laughing pretty much the whole time. His body language and swagger really comes through in the slow motion!


I’ve been working on this throw/sweep ever since he showed me. He catches the teep, pulls you into him a tiny bit and steps forward a tiny bit just enough to get his thigh under the falling leg, then uses his thigh against your teeping leg to take you on a torpedo turn onto your ass. It’s fantastic. I’ve seen trips off of a caught kick, but I’ve never seen one where you stay in your stance and don’t switch to southpaw. It feels very fast and should be easy to do, but I’m still trying to get used to it with my sparring partners. They’re not so into it, so I haven’t really “drilled” it so much as just trying to get it over on my partners. I feel like a fucking superstar when I even come close though.

Here was a little on Karuhat when I first met him as he helped in my corner

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Muay ThaiTechnique

A 100 lb. (46 kg) female Muay Thai fighter. Originally I trained under Kumron Vaitayanon (Master K) and Kaensak sor. Ploenjit in New Jersey. I then moved to Thailand to train and fight full time in April of 2012, devoting myself to fighting 100 Thai fights, as well as blogging full time. Having surpassed 100, and then 200, becoming the westerner with the most fights in Thailand, in history, my new goal is to fight an impossible 471 times, the historical record for the greatest number of documented professional fights (see western boxer Len Wickwar, circa 1940), and along the way to continue documenting the Muay Thai of Thailand in the Muay Thai Library project: see patreon.com/sylviemuay

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