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Muay Thai Bones ep 22 - On Thai Technique, Mechanization, Precision and Correction

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3 hours ago, Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu said:

Well, I think that's the point. In this case it was the class, collectively, which resolved the German text. ..... It's the communal construction of, and passing of knowledge. It's not one person "mastering" a technique (for themselves), or having special insight into the meaning of a text.

Yet in the analogy we are assuming we have varying degrees of knowledge of the topics. (German language, German idealism, hegels relationship to other philosophers) And if you did not have these things you wouldn't be able to get off the starting line. Let's go even further if none of you had any prior knowledge but knew where to look you would be looking at Hegel scholars who are individuals who have "special insight". I know it's an analogy and  only trying to be slightly annoying.

 

 Again I don't think we disagree on the benefits of communal problem solving, and this is how we train with contemporary BJJ. Coaches all the time tell you to talk to x person, study this person's game, visit this school etc. All people who are not "masters" in a context of reverence just people who we can learn from. My initial and current sticking point isn't that you shouldn't get stuck in the mud it's that your teammates should be the giants shoulders your standing on. 

 

Which again I also don't think you disagree with but this is the issue with me rambling on forums day and night

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38 minutes ago, AlexN said:

Yeah I came off really whiney sorry about that. I think part of the reason is that things get lost in the text and also because I agree with the deeper value of learning something and struggling with something over time. Though it feels like there is moments in which it's incredibly beneficial to have someone whether it's a peer or a teacher give you practical feedback within something. Which again I don't think you really disagree with either lol just hard to bounce ideas around sometimes without getting lost within the medium - forum posts that we are separated by time zones. Thanks for the book post it reminds me of trying to read Hume as a high schooler and having no clue what the fuck anything meant but attempting to learn by brute force.

I hear you. And especially discussions like these where we all have so many different experiences and reference points. 

I like both, getting time to learn something on my own, feeling it in my body. But also, sometimes it just helps with a very practical tip. 

I very much enjoy reading this discussion. Not only because of martial arts but also because its so important nowadays to learn how to learn. 

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On 9/28/2021 at 8:29 PM, AlexN said:

Yet in the analogy we are assuming we have varying degrees of knowledge of the topics. (German language, German idealism, hegels relationship to other philosophers) And if you did not have these things you wouldn't be able to get off the starting line. Let's go even further if none of you had any prior knowledge but knew where to look you would be looking at Hegel scholars who are individuals who have "special insight".

I hear you, but also understand that probably the most intense, most satisfying reading experience I ever had was as a child having found my mother's Critique of Pure Reason in the garage among so many dusty books - I was maybe 10 years old? - and trying to decipher that text painfully, without any context, as a 10 year old brain, sentence by sentence, almost word by word. I have no idea how far I got into it, but I was at it for months. I suspect I didn't learn very much about Kant's critique but it bestowed on me in the most powerful way a love for the hieroglyphics of Philosophy's over-specialized language, and led to to reading unending volumes throughout my young adulthood years up into my 30s and even 40s. That absolute incoherence, and my belief that special meaning was there, in those words gave me something that empowered my mind more than any cribnotes on Kant ever could. To this day it's a very special memory.

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