Jump to content
Irie

Side Teep in Traditional Muay Thai?

Recommended Posts

The side teep is my favourite kicking technique. In my eyes it's sadly underused across combat sports as a whole.

What are the opinions of people at the roundtable? Specifically why do you think it's less popular than the round kick or front teep?

Does Sylvie have any videos with it, was she ever taught it? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you mean a sidekick or a teep with a slight angle (Samart style) ? Both are used quite frequently, but the sidekick leaves you pretty exposed if you miss.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, shade said:

Do you mean a sidekick or a teep with a slight angle (Samart style) ? Both are used quite frequently, but the sidekick leaves you pretty exposed if you miss.

A samart style side teep. I personally feel like I don't see it that much, at least out of fights I've watched and the ones I've taken part in here in canada across a few different styles. Most people I've seen throw it in my experience either only turn their foot and hips slightly, like less than 45 degrees, or do a karate style side kick with a full chamber and hip rotation.

Curious what you mean about it leaving you pretty exposed, I don't see it. At least, no more than a round kick that misses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I mean if you do a front leg, sidekick (karate style) and it gets swept aside. Think "PKA kickboxing", you are very exposed. Since you also lack momentum you can't easily do a crocodile thrashes tail - as you can with a round kick. 

Samart actually did a seminar at Tiger a few years back where he focused on his side-teep. I'm not familiar with the fighting scene in canada, but I would guess it's the same as the fight scene elsewhere. Kids are mostly impacted by watching mma fights on youtube and they emulate what they see. Very few people actually take the time to watch Thais fight. There you see the side teep quite frequently. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/1/2021 at 3:48 PM, Irie said:

The side teep is my favourite kicking technique. In my eyes it's sadly underused across combat sports as a whole.

What are the opinions of people at the roundtable? Specifically why do you think it's less popular than the round kick or front teep?

Does Sylvie have any videos with it, was she ever taught it? 

The side Teep is the best move I've ever scene in Muay Thai. As it pressurizes the opponent and also makes the fighter more energetic. Because Side Teep is a technique and a fighter need more force for it, which ends in a good result.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Most Recent Topics

  • Latest Comments

  • The Latest From Open Topics Forum

    • My trainer (lethwei fighter) has a western boxing and MMA background which he uses for my footwork drills, and he shows me various movements with this lying ladder thing and cones. I think we rotate something like 20 various movements (5x3 rounds, forward and backwards at the end of every second session) plus single leg balancing things (stand on one leg, stand on one leg jump forward sideways backwards). We also do several rounds of frog jumps (low squat jumps) and duckwalks.  I love Knees over Toes guy. I also ask my friend and coach Bryan for a lot of advice. He produces a lot of great content related to posture and alignment here: https://instagram.com/fit.coach_bryan?utm_medium=copy_link
    • Ah, so this phenomena is the reality behind the karate films.  When feks Mr Miyagi barely touches the opp, and he falls down although a big strong fellow...   Or when Daniel san crushes a big ice cube in the same film. This is so because its a movie, but there IS a core of truth in there...  Exactly as you try to describe it.   A focused and  relaxed strike tends to be more powerful than brute strength.   Tx for this moment of insight!
    • In my experience, strikes are more powerful when they're relaxed and not "trying to be hard." Trying to control power usually tenses up the limbs and makes you both less able to control them and too slow and too light. Loose, relaxed and still fast but controlling the impact. "Letting your strikes go," is almost always a trying less "hard" and being relaxed. 
    • Oooo! This has actually given me some ideas for my own training now! Did you do fighting specific footwork drills or general athletic footwork drills?   And the walking backwards thing, did you get this idea from a guy named "KneesOverToesGuy"? Or trainers/own research?
    • Ooooh what an interesting topic, grow through adversity.  I've had meniscus tears on both knees, I am almost fully healed and they have helped me get better footwork, stronger kicks and I'm more versatile. Footwork: agility drills are great knee strengthening exercises so I've been doing countless drills (walking backwards also helps) which has also given me lighter and faster feet. Stronger kicks: I've been doing low squat jumps, duck walks, single-leg balance drills to strengthen my knees. This has also given me a lot more kick power.  Versatility: To avoid putting too much stress on one knee I've practiced switching stances a lot which has helped me improve my southpaw stance. In sparring, if I feel any discomfort in one knee I simply switch stance.  I've healed my knees through my own research and help from trainers, traditional and new knowledge.   
  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      1.1k
    • Total Posts
      9.9k
×
×
  • Create New...