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LengLeng

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  1. Like
    LengLeng reacted to Tom Riddle in Chicken elbows a typical muay thai thing?   
    @LengLeng More power to you. This year has no doubt effect most if us in the worse way possible and we all have something that haS effected us the most in these messed up times. 
    If you ever need someone to talk to then do let me know. 
  2. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from dtrick924 in Chicken elbows a typical muay thai thing?   
    I'm experiencing the second lock down of the year and haven't seen a gym since July. I'm training w a friend/trainer outside. Doing what we can, borrowing pads from friends hook then on to trees to emulate a boxing bags. I'm dealing with an injury so I'm studying physiotherapy and took up yoga again. I'm reading books that will help me train better(currently the Oxygen Avantage). I'm doing 75Hard to increase my mental strength (just Google 75hard and Andy Frisella if you interested). I adopted a stray kitten. I'm reaching out to strangers on social media asking for advice or sparring opportunities. 
    Grow through this instead of falling into the trap of paralyzing self-pity. 
  3. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from 515 in Gym remedies for injuries, illness and other ailments   
    Hi! Since I gathered a lot of expeirence getting injured and sick while training, I thought I would start a new topic, namely: gym/trainer advice received on how to care for injuries or ailments. 
    I will start with a couple of things I have been told and their origin. 
    Swollen, painful knuckles: massage with hot water and salt (western boxing coach, Sweden) Ligament or muscle issues: Ice bath with salt. Eat potatoes and ocra/lady fingers. (lethwei trainer, Myanmar) Any kind of muscle pain: warm water massage (basically all muay thai trainers, Thailand) Cough: gurgle with warm salt water (muay thai trainer, Thailand) Shin dents: gentle warm water massage downward motion (muay thai trainers, Thailand) Prevent skin rashes of any kind: rinse water directly after training then apply baby powder (muay thai trainer, Thailand) Pink eye: stay away, absolutely no clinching, hot water compress (muay thai trainers, Thailand)  
     
  4. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from 515 in Chicken elbows a typical muay thai thing?   
    During our current lockdown I discovered I live very close to a trainer from my gym and we have been training outside waiting for gyms to open. He had the exact same thing to say about my chicken arm as described above. He had an interesting drill though to fix it. Or you guys might know it, I've never seen it before  We stood opposite each other and with straight jabs and punches, punched each others gloves. And we stood shorter apart than arms length distance so I would have to "strike through" his glove. We did a couple of minutes if 12, 12, 112, 1hook2 etc.
    It was really uncomfortable but pretty effective ensuring arm hit straight into the target since the target was literally not bigger than a glove and with bent arm I would have hit the side of the glove.
  5. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from dtrick924 in Gym remedies for injuries, illness and other ailments   
    Hi! Since I gathered a lot of expeirence getting injured and sick while training, I thought I would start a new topic, namely: gym/trainer advice received on how to care for injuries or ailments. 
    I will start with a couple of things I have been told and their origin. 
    Swollen, painful knuckles: massage with hot water and salt (western boxing coach, Sweden) Ligament or muscle issues: Ice bath with salt. Eat potatoes and ocra/lady fingers. (lethwei trainer, Myanmar) Any kind of muscle pain: warm water massage (basically all muay thai trainers, Thailand) Cough: gurgle with warm salt water (muay thai trainer, Thailand) Shin dents: gentle warm water massage downward motion (muay thai trainers, Thailand) Prevent skin rashes of any kind: rinse water directly after training then apply baby powder (muay thai trainer, Thailand) Pink eye: stay away, absolutely no clinching, hot water compress (muay thai trainers, Thailand)  
     
  6. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from Oliver in Chicken elbows a typical muay thai thing?   
    During our current lockdown I discovered I live very close to a trainer from my gym and we have been training outside waiting for gyms to open. He had the exact same thing to say about my chicken arm as described above. He had an interesting drill though to fix it. Or you guys might know it, I've never seen it before  We stood opposite each other and with straight jabs and punches, punched each others gloves. And we stood shorter apart than arms length distance so I would have to "strike through" his glove. We did a couple of minutes if 12, 12, 112, 1hook2 etc.
    It was really uncomfortable but pretty effective ensuring arm hit straight into the target since the target was literally not bigger than a glove and with bent arm I would have hit the side of the glove.
  7. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from dtrick924 in Chicken elbows a typical muay thai thing?   
    During our current lockdown I discovered I live very close to a trainer from my gym and we have been training outside waiting for gyms to open. He had the exact same thing to say about my chicken arm as described above. He had an interesting drill though to fix it. Or you guys might know it, I've never seen it before  We stood opposite each other and with straight jabs and punches, punched each others gloves. And we stood shorter apart than arms length distance so I would have to "strike through" his glove. We did a couple of minutes if 12, 12, 112, 1hook2 etc.
    It was really uncomfortable but pretty effective ensuring arm hit straight into the target since the target was literally not bigger than a glove and with bent arm I would have hit the side of the glove.
  8. Like
    LengLeng reacted to Oliver in Chicken elbows a typical muay thai thing?   
    Funny, Teddy Atlas just mentioned this too
    From time 33.10
     
  9. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from Krystel in Should I trial before booking??   
    sorry I have only trained in Bangkok as I used to live and work in the city.
    Bangkok is a wonderful city but not great if you dont have any fight experience as there are not many fight opportunities other than Asiatique. The north is great for women apparently with plenty fight options. Some people like Phuket. 
    The women section on this forum has some threads on good gyms for women. and discussions on sexual assault and the legal system which you should be mindful of. 
  10. Cool
    LengLeng got a reaction from Krystel in Should I trial before booking??   
    I haven't been myself but I heard Sitjaopo is really great. And their students do get to fight, men and women. Hua Hin has a couple of places where they organize fights., so it would not be that difficult once covid is gone. 
  11. Like
    LengLeng reacted to AndyMaBobs in Chicken elbows a typical muay thai thing?   
    I don't know if Kenshin propagated it, because I've been hearing it since before he was on the internet - but it may have been him.
    I have been goofily trying to catch a non-existent kick from both a flared elbow and tighter elbow and I really don't think there is going to be a meaningful difference between them considering your arm is always going to be faster than your leg (unless something has gone horribly wrong).
    I was training with Damien Alamos shortly before he announced he was coming out of retirement, and we spent a lot of time exchanging and catching kicks and his preferred stance to each is the rear arm close to the body and the left arm higher and slightly extended (sort as if you were holding a knife pointing out at about face level - there wasn't any delay in the speed I could catch a kick, even as someone who was adopting a stance I'm not familiar with.
    Yeah it's really weird. I also think that people commonly misunderstand the difference between being a boxer, and being a puncher. There aren't many Thai's that have the same fearsome punching you'd expect of a kickboxer, but I usually find that Thais are better BOXERS in that even though their punching form is normally lacking, they do have a better understanding of distance and range and how to set up those punches. Good kickboxers like Cro Cop, Peter Aerts etc understand that whereas a guy like Robin Van Roosmalen would just swing and win because he's powerful.
    So I'll see guys in the gym who are doing bag only rounds trying to 'improve their boxing' but what they're actually doing is training their punching power, I usually tell them that they'll be better off in a boxing gym, or working with a  coach who understands boxing as a separate sport.
    Another I see a lot is the stiff leg muay thai kick, because so many people hear 'we don't bend the knee' and take it literally, rather than what it actually means being 'we don't chamber'.  
  12. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from Jeffo in "Deep Grooves"   
    I think this is more a rule of thumb thing than a fact. Learning new things while fatigued might help. When you tired you also expose your weaknesses. Fifth round on pads will tell you more about yourself than first round. 
    I think you can create systems for better learning, but I don't think there are any bulletproof ways that will always work.
    I don't believe physical movements can be taught by over-intellectualizing them which I see a lot of in this forum. 
    You want fluidity? Stop thinking go dancing. 
  13. Like
    LengLeng reacted to Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu in Chicken elbows a typical muay thai thing?   
    Sagat in the Muay Thai Library was the first one to really push hard at getting rid of this in Sylvie. It was a major point of his. Everything from within the frame. Sylvie would stand with her side against a wall to get the feeling right. Sagat was a pro boxer as well, and came from a boxing gym. Gyms with connections to boxing are much better at getting this right. Lots and lots of Muay Thai gyms get into bad habits with their winging punching, holding pads wide. Not only does it make punches less accurate, less consistent, I think the chicken wing also helps the opponent see the punch a hair sooner. When it come straight out of the body its very hard to see, track or gauge the speed of. I think this is a huge problem in Thailand's Muay Thai, to be honest.
  14. Like
    LengLeng reacted to Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu in Chicken elbows a typical muay thai thing?   
    Here is Sylvie using a wall to build that straight ahead, in the frame feeling. Not only on straights and cross, but elbows and hooks:
     
  15. Nak Muay
    LengLeng reacted to AndyMaBobs in Chicken elbows a typical muay thai thing?   
    It's something I have to train out of people often. I see a lot of people doing it, and there is an idea amongst some coaches that the flared elbows are some how to make kicks easier to catch. 
    For me though, if it does/doesn't make it easier to catch a kick, I would still rather my fighter hit them while they're on one leg as opposed to catch. And you don't NEED those flared elbows to be able to catch a kick, but you do need a tighter stance in order to have quicker more powerful punches.
    So if I have someone that flares their elbows a lot, I will try getting their arms in tighter (but not so tight that they'll be kicked in the arms all day). Ideally so they can not only go on offence, but use a cross guard and mummy guard easier too!
    But that's also a part of my relationship with a fighter I train, I'd advise you NOT to do it personally, but at the end of the day you're not working with me, and for sake of argument your coach might have a plan or style that values things I don't.
  16. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from AndyMaBobs in Chicken elbows a typical muay thai thing?   
    Since the start of this year I have been practicing Myanmar traditional boxing after two years of training muay thai in Thailand. These are similar, but also very different sports. 
    For example, this sport focuses much more on hands and most trainers would correct my punches, making them more straight, hence enhance knuckle power (you fight bare-knuckled). 
    I've recently have had the pleasure to train with an older very knowledgeable teacher who has operated his gym since 1982. He is in general very interested in most martial arts and has a lot of respect for muay thai as well. And the first thing he said when he saw my punches was that they were typical muay thai punches with the elbows slightly bent. 
    The thing is,, yes! I have seen it plenty of times, muay thai fighters on pads with slightly bent arms. But I've never had a muay thai teacher telling me to have my arms bent. They have always focused on getting my arms straight and punches more powerful. 
    So I am just wondering, where this is coming from?
  17. Like
    LengLeng reacted to Oliver in "Deep Grooves"   
    It's like clinching, some gyms you do it at the start of training but most of them do it at the end, right? My gym we do it at the start, which is cool and everything. The upsides are evident. But kinda prefer doing it at the end, after pads, after bag work etc, when you're damn well exhausted. Because that's how it will be in the fight, clinching when you already tired. 
    Which one helps you learn more, when fresh or when tired? Honestly don't know. Feels pretty much same same personally. Just prefer clinching when tired - also the body feels more loose and supple.
  18. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu in "Deep Grooves"   
    I think this is more a rule of thumb thing than a fact. Learning new things while fatigued might help. When you tired you also expose your weaknesses. Fifth round on pads will tell you more about yourself than first round. 
    I think you can create systems for better learning, but I don't think there are any bulletproof ways that will always work.
    I don't believe physical movements can be taught by over-intellectualizing them which I see a lot of in this forum. 
    You want fluidity? Stop thinking go dancing. 
  19. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from Oliver in "Deep Grooves"   
    I had a crossfit coach once who told me  to work on gymnastics technique when I am tired. Easier to get it right because the body is exhausted and will naturally use the best technique for the movement to waste as little energy as possible. And you are too tired to overthink stuff. 
  20. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from Oliver in "Deep Grooves"   
    I think this is more a rule of thumb thing than a fact. Learning new things while fatigued might help. When you tired you also expose your weaknesses. Fifth round on pads will tell you more about yourself than first round. 
    I think you can create systems for better learning, but I don't think there are any bulletproof ways that will always work.
    I don't believe physical movements can be taught by over-intellectualizing them which I see a lot of in this forum. 
    You want fluidity? Stop thinking go dancing. 
  21. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from Jeffo in "Deep Grooves"   
    I had a crossfit coach once who told me  to work on gymnastics technique when I am tired. Easier to get it right because the body is exhausted and will naturally use the best technique for the movement to waste as little energy as possible. And you are too tired to overthink stuff. 
  22. Like
    LengLeng reacted to Sylvie von Duuglas-Ittu in Chicken elbows a typical muay thai thing?   
    I've never seen that bent elbow thing purposefully trained. I think there's a tendency toward it because of how pads are held, lots of fighters probably imitate each other, and then it's never corrected. When I see corrections in Muay Thai, it's always toward straighter punches. I've never, ever seen that weird chicken wing punch taught, instructed, or praised. It's just tolerated... a lot.
  23. Like
    LengLeng reacted to Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu in "Deep Grooves"   
    I think there is a lot to that. Yes, you can pick up bad habits like "dropping your hands" etc, but a little correction, and a continuous emphasis on ruup and defense, goes a long way. The Thais talk a lot about "tamachat" (be natural). When tired lots of the path of least resistance movements come out, I believe.
  24. Like
    LengLeng got a reaction from Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu in "Deep Grooves"   
    I had a crossfit coach once who told me  to work on gymnastics technique when I am tired. Easier to get it right because the body is exhausted and will naturally use the best technique for the movement to waste as little energy as possible. And you are too tired to overthink stuff. 
  25. Like
    LengLeng reacted to Oliver in "light bulb" moments   
    Yeah not sure dude, never did any cycling or swimming and stuff ever, but yeah ppl say that's all very good too.
    Am no expert or anything, just tend do what the trainer says and don't think about it. But yeah in recent years there's been loads of sciencey people and various athletes coming out saying running doesn't work, running is bad for you, overtraining etc etc. But... cannot reconcile that with personal training experience. When running a lot and regularly, everything else feels easier and smoother in training. 10k every morning, and another 4k later in afternoon.
    When first starting out? Felt nothing but hatred for running. Thinking, "Wait a sec, if I knew how to run I wouldn't have learned how to fight, wtf yo...". Just kept my mouth shut and did it anyway cuz the trainer was scary and didn't wanna get in trouble. Then, after first 3 years, started to love it. Like, really really really fucking love running, and will keep doing it until the old man days.
    This is just one guy's 2 cents, but now it feels like the biggest benefit isn't even the cardio. Obviously that's super important, not denying it's good for that. But even better than the endurance it gives, it improves my concentration throughout the day and makes you really calm and balanced mentally. 
    Plus it feels like the body kick and knee are stronger with regular running, but dunno if that's a placebo effect or not. But shit, even if it is, I'll take it.
     
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